Adherents.com - Religion by Location


Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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Korea, South, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Protestant Korea, South - 41.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "; Protestant "includes all non-Roman Catholic denominations "
Protestant Korea, South 8,210,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Protestant Korea, South - 27.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
Protestant Korea, South - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "A Window on Korea "; web page: "Protestantism in Korea " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999) "Since the Korean War, Protestant churches have experienced such phenomenal growth that today there are 70 denominations in Korea. The year 1985 was the centennial of Protestantism in Korea and more than 20 denominations and 24 organizations set up a Council for the 100th Anniversary of the Korean Church to plan various programs in memory of church pioneers and to bring the Protestant churches together as one church. "
Protestant - clergy Korea, South 31,740 - 21,243
units
- 1983 *LINK* web site: "Little Korea "; web page: "Religion " (viewed 22 Jan. 1999) Table: "Status of Religions " (as of 1983); 3 columns: "churches ", "clergymen ", "followers "; presumably this is from a government survey or census.
Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia Korea, South - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site (1998) Counted listings in directory of parishes.
shamanism Korea, South 70,000 - - - 1985 *LINK* web page: "Fortunetelling in Korea, Inc. " (viewed 15 April 1999). Author: Alexander Cho. "Stockholm School of Economics & EIJS, 1997 " "Shamanism underwent a revival during the 1980s and a national Shaman-association registered 70,000 due paying members in the mid 80s. Chun Do Hwan, the Korean president during 1980-1988 stressed the preservation of ancient cultural traditions. "
shamanism Korea, South 2,230,000 5.00% - - 1994 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Presbyterian Church of Korea (PCK) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 44.6 million... Main religions: Christianity (20%), Buddhism (30%), Shamanism (5%), Confucianism (5%), non-religious and culturalised Confucianism (40%)... "
shamanism Korea, South - 10.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
shamanism Korea, South - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998), pg. 210. "If one could peer into the souls of Korean people, one would find fascinating elements of shamanism, the folk worship of a pantheon of household, village and animate and inanimate forces of nature. Koreans, like other Asians, maintain ancient traditions such as the kut, or exorcising ceremonies. These practices have not been fully institutionalized into a religion, but shamanism has been kept very much alive in Korea--as in the deification of Sanshin, a non-Buddhist mountain god, who has found his way into special shrines located within the courtyards of Buddhist temple complexes. "
Soka Gakkai Korea, South - - - - 1965 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 415. "After normalization of relations with Japan in the 1960s, some Japanese movements entered Korea, notably Tenri-kyo and Soka Gakkai. "
Taejonggyo Korea, South - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 415. "At Sindo-an village in the foothills of Keiryong Mountain near Taejon, a number of indigenous sects have their center. This is popularly regarded as the site of the future capital of the country, under a leader of the Chong family, as foretold in a sixteenth century messianic text, the Chonggam-nok. "
Taejonggyo Korea, South - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "A Window on Korea "; web page: "Taejonggyo: The Oldest Religion in Korea " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999) "Korea's oldest religion, other than nature worship, is Taejonggyo. Called Koshindo until the early 20th century, it embodies a myth of national foundation comparable to other nations. There are few adherents of this belief today, but it has obviously influenced later religious developments... By the 15th century, this cult had practically disappeared. However, the resurgence of Korean nationalism and a spirit of independence in the late 19th and early 20th centuries led to the appearance of several sects claiming to represent a revival of this ancient cult. "
Tangun Korea, South - - - - 1945 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 415. "The veneration of Tangun as center of a national cult was promoted by Na Ch'ol (1864-1916), but it could not operate freely in the Japanese era. After 1945 it was revived and regional centers of worship were built, but the religion lacked popular appeal. "
Taoism Korea, South - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998), pg. 210. "Daoism has been practiced in Korea for more than 1,300 years, but active examples of its presence ar rare these days. Though Daoist texts were often studied in thepast, and though some of Korea's Buddhist temples temporarily served as Doist temples, few remnants of early Daoist art survive today. Daoism achieved its greatest height in Korea during the Unified Silla dynasty (AD 668-918). Practitioners aren't so dedicated today, but Daoism is experiencing something of a renaissance as a number of modern schools draw on its teachings. "
Tenrikyo Korea, South - - - - 1965 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 415. "After normalization of relations with Japan in the 1960s, some Japanese movements entered Korea, notably Tenri-kyo and Soka Gakkai. "
Tenrikyo Korea, South - - 150
units
- 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 1 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo 1998 ". Church-supplied data. 1 mission headquarters; 79 churches; 70 mission stations
Tenrikyo - graduated from Shuyoka Korea, South 19 - - - 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 2 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "Statistics on followers who... graduated from Shuyoka... between Jan. and Dec. 1998. "; "Data by Research Section and Overseas Mission Department "
Tenrikyo - new Besseki Pledge Korea, South 228 - - - 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 2 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "Statistics on followers who took the Besseki Pledge... between Jan. and Dec. 1998. "; "Data by Research Section and Overseas Mission Department "
Tenrikyo - received the Sazuke Korea, South 39 - - - 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 2 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "Statistics on followers who... received the Sazuke... between Jan. and Dec. 1998. "; "Data by Research Section and Overseas Mission Department "
Unification Church Korea, South - - - - 1954 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "UNIFICATION CHURCH... which gained much publicity in the 1970s. The full name of the movement is The Holy Spirit Association for The Unification of World Christianity, and was founded in 1954 by an engineer Sun Myung MOON. "
Unification Church Korea, South - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 415. "A number of groups have arisen under Protestant influence. The best known outside of Korea is the Unification Church. "
Unification Church Korea, South - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 493. "Moon, Sun Myung... leder of the Unification Church. Born in northern Korea, Moon was for a time affiliated with the Presbyterian church. "
Unification Church Korea, South 50,000 - - - 1990 Long, Robert Emmet (ed.). Religious Cults in America (The Reference Shelf: Volume 66 Number 4), New York: The H. W. Wilson Co. (1994), pg. 158. [Orig. source: article by Peter Maas, Korean correspondent for The Washington Post. From The New Republic, 203:7-8+ N 9 1990)] "...his religion has hardly taken hold in his own homeland of South Korea, where his critics say membership is a humble 50,000. "
Unification Church Korea, South - 1.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
Unification Church Korea, South - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998), pg. 210. "About 500,000 Koreans belong to a wide variety of 'minor' religions. The most well-known internationally is the Unification Church, a movement started by Moon Sun-myung, a North Korean refugee, in 1954. "
Urantia Book Readers, Fellowship of Korea, South - - 1
unit
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site (1998) directory: "1996-1997 International Study Group Directory for readers of The Urantia Book "
Won Buddhism Korea, South 800,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 414-415. "Won Buddhism. In 1916 Pak Chungbin (1891-1943) became enlightened and founded in southwest Korea a new movement based on the completeness of the Dharmakaya and on Buddha as the Absolute. It is called Won (complete) Buddhism. Stressing a correct understanding of grace, activity in spreading Buddhist teaching, and selfless service to others, the movement is perhaps the most lively form of Buddhism in South Korea today, with 800,000 members. "
Won Buddhism Korea, South 96,333 0.26% 344
units
- 1983 *LINK* web site: "Little Korea "; web page: "Religion " (viewed 22 Jan. 1999) Table: "Status of Religions " (as of 1983); 3 columns: "churches ", "clergymen ", "followers "; presumably this is from a government survey or census.; Listed in table as "Wonbulgyo "
Won Buddhism Korea, South - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 415. "Won Buddhism - Kor. won, lit. 'circular'; modern Buddhist folk movement in South Korea, founded by Soe-tae San (1891-1943)... The followers... are active in social and charitable work. In the postwar years they established numerous kindergartens, schools, and universities... Today Won Buddhism has many followers. "
Won Buddhism Korea, South 140,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; Listed in table as "Wonbulgyo "; [ "Won Buddhism " is another name for "Wonbulgyo "]
Won Buddhism Korea, South - - 400
units
- 1998 *LINK* Official organization web site; web page: "A Brief Historial Sketch " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999); [See also: other link on this site] "...over 400 temples throughout South Korea. "; [ "Won Buddhism " is another name for "Wonbulgyo "]
Won Buddhism - clergy Korea, South 3,921 - 344
units
- 1983 *LINK* web site: "Little Korea "; web page: "Religion " (viewed 22 Jan. 1999) Table: "Status of Religions " (as of 1983); 3 columns: "churches ", "clergymen ", "followers "; presumably this is from a government survey or census.; Listed in table as "Wonbulgyo "
Yoido Full Gospel Church Korea, South 5 - - - 1958 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994), 221. "...Yoido Full Gospel (Pentecostal) Church. As we noted, the Yoido congregation is a megachurch. Its 800,000 membership makes it the largest congregation in the world. With an initial membership of 5 in 1958... "
Yoido Full Gospel Church Korea, South 2,000 - - - 1963 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994), 222. "In 1963, within 5 years of its founding, the church had 2,000 members. Each became a dedicated messenger and recruiter, bringing others into the ever enlarging fold. "
Yoido Full Gospel Church Korea, South 15,000 - - - 1971 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994), 222. "By 1971 there were 15,000 members; by 1981 there were 200,000. The congregation now lists over 800,000, most of whom take part in small face-to-face prayer and study groups in addition to the plenary gathering in the church's massive temple. "
Yoido Full Gospel Church Korea, South 800,000 - - - 1994 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994), 221. "...Yoido Full Gospel (Pentecostal) Church. As we noted, the Yoido congregation is a megachurch. Its 800,000 membership makes it the largest congregation in the world. "
Yoido Full Gospel Church Korea, South 800,000 - - - 1994 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994), last page of center photo section. "Dr. David Yonggi Cho... leads the Yoido Full Gospel (Pentecostal) Church in Seoul, Korea. Its 800,000 members make it the largest single Christian congregation anywhere in the world. "
Yoido Full Gospel Church Korea, South - - - - 1998 Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe. "Religion " in The Future Now: Predicting the 21st Century. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (1998), pg. 53. "In South Korea Dr. Yonggi Cho invites catechumens into his 'Full Gospel' Church with a promise of bounding riches and bouncing bodies... an abominable prosperity-cult... "
miscellaneous regional info Korea, South - - - - 1989 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Est. 42.2 million [Total pop.] (1989). Great diversity, incl. Buddhism, Confucianism, Ch'ondogyo, Catholicism, & Protestantism, and as many as 300 new religions incorporating elements of these mainstream religions. Shamanism oldest religious tradition.
Christianity Korea, South: Seoul - - 2,050
units
- 1979 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994), pg. 233. "Available statistics show that in 1979 there were 2,050 Christian churches in Seoul. By August of 1981, the Korean government's Ministry of Culture and Information estimated that there were 4,700. "
Christianity Korea, South: Seoul - - 4,700
units
- 1981 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994), pg. 233. "By August of 1981, the Korean government's Ministry of Culture and Information estimated that there were 4,700. Most of these are pentecostal congregations. "
Christianity Korea, South: Seoul - - 5,000
units
- 1994 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994), pg. 222. "A reliable recent estimate says there are now more than 5,000 Christian church buildings in Seoul alone. That number, as Koreans wryly remark, even exceeds the count of coffee shops and drugstores. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - temples Korea, South: Seoul - - 1
unit
- 1996 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1996), pg. 435-436. Table: "Temples of the Church "; Seoul
House Church Movement Korea, South: Seoul - - 230
units
- 1981 Fichter, Joseph. The Holy Family of Father Moon. Kansas City, MO: Leaven Press (1985), pg. 120-121. Home Churches: members feel obligation to "be concerned for the 360 families [of non-Unificationists] in his immediate neighborhood. "; "They reported also that in the fall of 1981 there were 230 home churches in the city of Seoul alone, and that similar home churches had been set up all over the Republic of Korea... Our assumption has to be that the 230 home churches in the city are promoted by individuals (or married couples) who regularly attend services at the [30 Unification] centeres. "
Unification Church Korea, South: Seoul - - 30
units
- 1981 Fichter, Joseph. The Holy Family of Father Moon. Kansas City, MO: Leaven Press (1985), pg. 120-121. "Many Unificationists in the city of Seoul are not yet personally committed to the Home Church movement. As a matter of current practice they attend religious services on Sundays -- and sometimes on Wednesday evenings -- at any one of the 30 Unification centers... "
Albanian Kosova 1,800,000 90.00% - - 1994 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Kosova " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "Kosova is situated in the southern territory of former Yugoslavia and borders with Serbia, Albania, Montenegro and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. The capital is Pristina. Area: 10,887 km2. The population is around 2 million of whom about 90% are Albanians. The remaining 10% include Serb and Muslims, Montenegrins, Turks, Croats and Gypsies. The Albanians in Kosova are descendants of the ancient Illyrian tribe of the Dardanians, who lived in Kosova from ancient times. Serbian attachment to Kosova originates in the Middle Ages, when Kosova was the 'cradle' of the Serb and of its Serbian Orthodox Church. "
Albanian Kosovo - 90.00% - - 1999 Black, Eric. Bosnia: Fractured Region. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co. (1999), pg. 51. "Kosovo lies between the main part of Serbia and Albania. The region's population is 90% ethnic Albanian and 10% Serbian. "
Eastern Orthodox Kosovo - - 1,300
units
- 1999 *LINK* Mertens, Richard (Religious News Service). "Kosovo's Ethnic Violence Taking Toll on Sacred Sites " in Salt Lake Tribune, 2 Oct. 1999 (v. online 3 Oct. 99). "According to Orthodox officials, 1,300 churches and monasteries are scattered throughout Kosovo, some of them from the 13th century, well before the Turks brought Islam to the Balkans. The attacks against the Orthodox churches strike at this legacy, and at the very roots of the Serb presence in Kosovo. Some of the churches have been looted and burned. Others, like the churches in Musutiste, have been demolished with explosives, suggesting to some the motive is not simple revenge but a systematic effort to drive Serbs from Kosovo. The oldest and most prized Orthodox sites, celebrated for their old frescoes and impressive architecture, have thus far been spared, largely because of NATO's protection. "
Islam Kosovo - - - - 1999 *LINK* Mertens, Richard (Religious News Service). "Kosovo's Ethnic Violence Taking Toll on Sacred Sites " in Salt Lake Tribune, 2 Oct. 1999 (v. online 3 Oct. 99). "In Pec, a city 40 miles from Musutiste, the Serbs burned all 34 mosques, according to the Kosovo Islamic community. These included the Qarshise Mosque, built in 1471 and one of the oldest of its kind in Kosovo... The violence in Kosovo is not a religious war, but religion has sharpened the conflict. Most ethnic Albanians in Kosovo are Muslim, whereas the Serbs are Orthodox Christian. This difference has made religious institutions a natural target as Serbs, and now Albanians, have tried to sever the other group's ties to the province. According to the Islamic community of Kosovo, 187 mosques were burned or damaged by explosives between March 1998 and this past June, when Serb forces withdrew from Kosovo... Clergy, too, have been caught up in the violence. Muslim leaders say 30 members of the clergy and religion students were killed this spring. Three others are missing, while 10 languish in Serbian prisons. "
Serb Kosovo - 10.00% - - 1999 Black, Eric. Bosnia: Fractured Region. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co. (1999), pg. 51. "Kosovo lies between the main part of Serbia and Albania. The region's population is 90% ethnic Albanian and 10% Serbian. "
Catholic Kuwait 155,000 9.17% 5
units
- 1995 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997), pg. 333-367. Figures are as of Dec. 31, 1995. Number used for "congregations " is from number of Catholic parishes.
Hinduism Kuwait - 2.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Islam Kuwait 1,000,000 93.00% - - 1978 Welch, Alford T. "Islam " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 164-165. [Original src: Weeks, R. (ed.), "Muslim Peoples: A World Ethnographic Survey " (1978).] Table: "Approximate Muslim populations and percentages of total populations "
Islam Kuwait 1,000,000 98.00% - - 1986 *LINK* Web site: "Arabic Paper "; web page: "Muslim Countries of the World " (viewed 15 June 1999). [Written 1998.] [NOTE: Unreliable statistical methodology.] "In 1986... Muslim Education Trust organization [U.K.] obtained... 1971 census & [info. from] Embassies of the respective countires... 1971 census showed the Independent Muslim countries pop. was around 784.5 Million. "; "...add (784.5M + 308M [minority Muslim countries]) = 1092.5 Million Muslims in 1971 "; Table shows country, "population " [number of Muslims in the country], & % Muslim. Total adds up to 896,080,000, so these figures are apparently intended to be estimates for 1986.
Islam Kuwait 1,710,000 90.00% - - 1990 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: 9/22/90 issue of GLOBAL PRAYER DIGEST); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) "The Hawarith Bedouin are Muslim, as is about ninety percent of the 1,900,000 people in Kuwait. "
Islam Kuwait - 90.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Islam Kuwait 1,163,250 99.00% - - 1992 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies 1992 estimate 1,175,000 [total pop.]. Most Kuwaitis are Sunni Muslims. About 20 percent of citizens are Shia Muslims. Most foreigners are also Muslims, the majority Sunni.
Islam Kuwait 1,559,129 85.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Muslim 85% (Shi'a 30%, Sunni 45%, other 10%), Christian, Hindu, Parsi, and other 15%; Total population: 1,834,269 (July 1997 est.) note: includes 1,381,063 non-nationals (July 1997 est.)
Islam Kuwait 540,000 30.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 418-419. "Location: Kuwait; Population: 1.8 million (40% of whom are Kuwait citizens) "; "Today, about 70% of Kuwaiti citizens are Sunni Muslims, while 30% are Shi'ite Muslims. "
Islam Kuwait 1,260,000 70.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 418-419. "Location: Kuwait; Population: 1.8 million (40% of whom are Kuwait citizens) "; "Today, about 70% of Kuwaiti citizens are Sunni Muslims, while 30% are Shi'ite Muslims. "
Islam Kuwait 1,800,000 100.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 418-419. "Location: Kuwait; Population: 1.8 million (40% of whom are Kuwait citizens) "; "Today, about 70% of Kuwaiti citizens are Sunni Muslims, while 30% are Shi'ite Muslims. "
Islam Kuwait - 85.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Wholesome Words: Worldwide Missions " by Stephen Ross, "First Edition, 1998 "; [original sources: The World Book Encyclopedia, c1998.] Table: "Major Muslim Countries of the World "
Islam Kuwait 3,040,500 95.50% - - 2000 K. F. Bin Mohd Noor. "Muslims Statistics... for Year 2000 " [orig. src: Barrett. World Christian Encyclopedia, 1982] Table
Islam - other Kuwait 210,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
other Kuwait 310,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; "other " = NOT Muslim
Shiite Kuwait 500,100 30.00% - - 1983 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986), pg. 219. "Population: 1,667,000. Religion: Nearly all Moslems; majority Sunni with about 30% Shi'ite. "
Shiite Kuwait - 27.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Shiite Kuwait 235,000 20.00% - - 1992 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies 1992 estimate 1,175,000 [total pop.]. Most Kuwaitis are Sunni Muslims. About 20 percent of citizens are Shia Muslims. Most foreigners are also Muslims, the majority Sunni.
Shiite Kuwait 230,000 23.00% - - 1994 Fluehr-Lobban, Carolyn. Islamic Society in Practice; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1994), pg. 21. Map: "Shi'ite population in the Middle East. Copyright by Diederik Vanderwalle. "
Shiite Kuwait 620,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Shiite Kuwait 550,281 30.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Muslim 85% (Shi'a 30%, Sunni 45%, other 10%), Christian, Hindu, Parsi, and other 15%; Total population: 1,834,269 (July 1997 est.) note: includes 1,381,063 non-nationals (July 1997 est.)
Sunni Kuwait 1,166,900 70.00% - - 1983 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986), pg. 219. "Population: 1,667,000. Religion: Nearly all Moslems; majority Sunni with about 30% Shi'ite. "
Sunni Kuwait - 63.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Sunni Kuwait 940,000 80.00% - - 1992 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies 1992 estimate 1,175,000 [total pop.]. Most Kuwaitis are Sunni Muslims. About 20 percent of citizens are Shia Muslims. Most foreigners are also Muslims, the majority Sunni.


Kuwait, continued

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