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Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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Japan - Koreans, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Kakure Kirishitan Japan: Amakusa and Sakitsu 6,000 - - - 1868 *LINK* Nosco, Peter. "Secrecy and the transmission of tradition: Issues in the study of the 'underground' Christians " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies (March 1993, 20/1), pg. 23. (viewed on JJRS web site 30 Jan. 1999) "it is estimated that there were five to six thousand Christians in Amakusa and Sakitsu in the 1860s; and Fr. Prudence Girard estimated that there were some 20,000 Christians in some 40 to 50 communities in and near Nagasaki. "
Soka Gakkai Japan: Hokkaido - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1498. "Soka Gakkai, in a way not dissimilar to the publishing organization of Jehovah's Witnesses, became the agency of evangelism... they achieved results, not least in winning many adherents in Hokkaido, the northern island in which the miners' union, Tanro, had previously held undisputed sway. Part of its appeal is the clear manifestation of power communicated by the movement and its methods of proselytizing... "
Korean temples Japan: Ikoma - - - - 1988 *LINK* Takafumi,Iida. "Folk Religion Among the Koreans in Japan The Shamanism of the 'Korean Temples' " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "'Korean temples' are particularly densely concentrated in the Zushi valley (12 temples, Kamiishikiri-ch'), Nukata valley (10 temples, Yamate-ch'), and Narukawa valley (6 temples, Kamishij), with a heavy concentration also at the foot of the mountains in Yao City (16 temples) and Ikoma City (8 temples). These temples are conveniently located within ten kilometers of areas with large Korean populations. However, the question remains as to why these temples were built in the valleys of the Ikoma mountains rather than in the towns where the people live. "
Korean temples Japan: Ikoma - - 60
units
- 1988 *LINK* Takafumi,Iida. "Folk Religion Among the Koreans in Japan The Shamanism of the 'Korean Temples' " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "The group of 'Korean temples' in the suburbs of Osaka, where the largest number of Koreans in Japan reside, is a religious phenomenon consisting of a syncretism of Korean Shamanism, Korean Buddhism, and Japanese mountain religion... The 'Korean temples' have been established in this area by the Korean residents mostly since after the war (1945), though a few were started before the war, and have added a new dimension to the religious traditions of Ikoma. Our survey discovered a total of about sixty temples in the Ikoma area. There is no other place in Japan where such a dense collection of Korean religious institutions are to be found, and it is rare even in Korea. "
Choge Buddhism Japan: Kyoto 1,500 - 1
unit
- 1988 *LINK* Takafumi,Iida. "Folk Religion Among the Koreans in Japan The Shamanism of the 'Korean Temples' " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "As for Buddhism, there are seven temples in Japan (two in Osaka, four in Tokyo, one in Kyoto) with 7,950 members (4,300 in Osaka, 2,150 in Tokyo, and 1,500 in Kyoto) belonging to the Choge sect, the main Buddhist organization in Korea. "
Kakure Kirishitan Japan: Nagasaki 20,000 - 50
units
- 1868 *LINK* Nosco, Peter. "Secrecy and the transmission of tradition: Issues in the study of the 'underground' Christians " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies (March 1993, 20/1), pg. 23. (viewed on JJRS web site 30 Jan. 1999) "it is estimated that there were five to six thousand Christians in Amakusa and Sakitsu in the 1860s; and Fr. Prudence Girard estimated that there were some 20,000 Christians in some 40 to 50 communities in and near Nagasaki. "
Choge Buddhism Japan: Osaka 4,300 - 2
units
- 1988 *LINK* Takafumi,Iida. "Folk Religion Among the Koreans in Japan The Shamanism of the 'Korean Temples' " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "As for Buddhism, there are seven temples in Japan (two in Osaka, four in Tokyo, one in Kyoto) with 7,950 members (4,300 in Osaka, 2,150 in Tokyo, and 1,500 in Kyoto) belonging to the Choge sect, the main Buddhist organization in Korea. "
Korean Christian Church in Japan Japan: Osaka 1,460 - 11
units
- 1985 *LINK* Takafumi,Iida. "Folk Religion Among the Koreans in Japan The Shamanism of the 'Korean Temples' " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "First, with regard to Christianity, there is no widespread growth like that on the Korean mainland. The main Protestant organization is the Zainichi Daikan Kirisuto Ky'kai S'kai (Korean Christian Church in Japan), with 58 churches claiming 4,803 members throughout Japan. Eleven of these churches, with 1,460 members, are located in Osaka (Zainichi Daikan Kirisuto Ky'kai S'kai 1985, pp. 175-176). "
Kakure Kirishitan Japan: Sotome 8,000 - - - 1868 *LINK* Nosco, Peter. "Secrecy and the transmission of tradition: Issues in the study of the 'underground' Christians " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies (March 1993, 20/1), pg. 23. (viewed on JJRS web site 30 Jan. 1999) "Fr. De Rotz estimated that there were some eight thousand Christians in Sotome when he arrived in the late 1860s "
Tenrikyo Japan: Tenri-shi - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 752. "Near the old capital Nara, on the Nakayama family land, the headquarters of Tenri-kyo have been built, and around them has grown a city called Tenri. It is a most impressive installation, including a great worship hall, a sanctuary of the founder, and numerous other buildings, housing offices, a school system, a university, a library, an ethnological museum, dormitories, a modern hosptial, and other facilities. "
Tenrikyo Japan: Tenri-shi - - - - 1994 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 221. "In Japan an entire town of some fifty thousand people, Tenri-shi, is dedicated to this faith. It contains Tenrikyo schools from kindergarten through college, the religious headquarters, an extensive hostels for pilgrims. "
Choge Buddhism Japan: Tokyo 2,150 - 4
units
- 1988 *LINK* Takafumi,Iida. "Folk Religion Among the Koreans in Japan The Shamanism of the 'Korean Temples' " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "As for Buddhism, there are seven temples in Japan (two in Osaka, four in Tokyo, one in Kyoto) with 7,950 members (4,300 in Osaka, 2,150 in Tokyo, and 1,500 in Kyoto) belonging to the Choge sect, the main Buddhist organization in Korea. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - temples Japan: Tokyo - - 1
unit
- 1996 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1996), pg. 435-436. Table: "Temples of the Church "; Tokyo
Christianity Japan: Tokyo: Ginza - - 1
unit
- 1986 *LINK* Ishii, Kenji. "The Secularization of Religion in the City " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1986: 13/2-3 (viewed online 30 Jan. 1999). "The Ginza in Tokyo is a small district which covers not even one square kilometer... As our investigation revealed, there are at present not less than 36 religious facilities in the district, of which the majority are Inari shrines... Only four are religious institutions in the strict sense with a legal identity and which actively propagate their teachings: the Ginza Church of Konk'oky'o, Ginza (Christian) Church, the Hachikan Shrine, and the H'oju Inari Shrine... "
Konkokyo Japan: Tokyo: Ginza - - 1
unit
- 1986 *LINK* Ishii, Kenji. "The Secularization of Religion in the City " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1986: 13/2-3 (viewed online 30 Jan. 1999). "The Ginza in Tokyo is a small district which covers not even one square kilometer... As our investigation revealed, there are at present not less than 36 religious facilities in the district, of which the majority are Inari shrines dedicated to the Fox Deity... Only four are religious institutions in the strict sense with a legal identity and which actively propagate their teachings: the Ginza Church of Konk'oky'o, Ginza (Christian) Church, the Hachikan Shrine, and the H'oju Inari Shrine. The Asahi Inari is a subordinate shrine of the Hie Shrine elsewhere in Tokyo. "
Anglican Jersey 54,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Catholic Jersey 20,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Christianity Jersey - - - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Anglican, Roman Catholic, Baptist, Congregational New Church, Methodist, Presbyterian; Total population: 88,510. (Crown dependency of Great Britain)
other Jersey 14,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; "other " = NOT Roman Catholic or Anglican
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Johnston Atoll - - 1
unit
- 1995 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1996), pg. 188-408. "Year-end 1995: Est. population [of country]; Members, [number shown in '# of adherents' column to left] "
Arab Jordan - - - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999), pg. 60. Pg. 60: "Jordan's population of 4.4 million (not including the West Bank)... The vast majority of inhabitants are of Arab origin, most of whom follow Islam and are of the Sunni branch. "
Armenian Apostolic Church Jordan - - - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999), pg. 60. Pg. 60: "Jordan's population of 4.4 million (not including the West Bank)... About 7 per cent of the nation's people are Christian... A small percentage of Armenians and other cultural minorities live in Amman, as well as in other parts of the country. "
Bahai Faith Jordan - - - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999), pg. 67. "The North Jordan Valley contains a small community of Turkomans and Bahais, who moved from Iran to Jordan in 1910. They settle don land in Jordan that was bought in 1879 by Abdul Baha Abbas, the leader of the Bahia Faith. "
Baptist World Alliance Jordan 1,000 0.02% 12
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "; [BWA stats. in individual countries are sum of figures for member bodies of BWA in the countries.]; [County population figures for 1998 from United Nations data available here.]
Bedouin Jordan - - - - 1985 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Jordan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988), pg. 41. "Although the Bedouin actually represent only a small percentage of the Jordanian population, they have enjoyed a strong political and cultural role in Jordan. They are loyal to King Hussein and make up a high percentage of the Jordanian army. Perhaps because Bedouin are sometimes viewed as the original Arabs, East Bank Jordanians uphold the Bedouin lifestyle as a model for all Jordanians to follow. The Bedouin live primarily in the eastern two-thirds of Jordan, a desert region that stretches from Jordan's Syrian and Iraqi frontiers in the north to its Suadi Arabian borders in the south. They may also be found in the western portion--including Amman--at some times of the year. "
Bedouin Jordan - 7.00% - - 1988 Whitehead, Susan. Jordan. New Haven, CT: Chelsea House Publishers (1988), pg. 40-41. "The nomadic tribes who wandered over the desert and established tribal territories in the region are the ancestors of the modern Bedouin who now make up seven per cent of the kingdom's population... Today, some Bedouin still follow the traditional way of life. They live with few tools and no furniture, carrying their houses on the backs of their camels when the desert's scanty pasture is exhausted and new grazing has to be found. "
Bedouin Jordan 308,000 7.00% - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999), pg. 60. Pg. 60: "Jordan's population of 4.4 million (not including the West Bank)... Of all the people in the Middle East, none has a reputation as exalted as the Bedu, or Bedouin. Largely a nomadic people, they cling to ancient ways, living by fabled codes of hospitality and kinship. Totalling about seven per cent of the population, they wander in Jordan's desserts, and those of Saudi Arabia, Syria and Iraq. "
Catholic Jordan 66,000 1.20% 62
units
- 1995 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997), pg. 333-367. Figures are as of Dec. 31, 1995. Number used for "congregations " is from number of Catholic parishes.
Catholic Jordan - 1.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 3,813,000
Christianity Jordan 301,600 8.00% - - 1983 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986), pg. 204. "Population: Estimated 3,770,000 in 1984-85, including approximately 972,000 under Israeli occupation on the West Bank. Religion: 92% Sunni Moslem, 8% Christian. "
Christianity Jordan 208,000 8.00% - - 1985 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Jordan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988), pg. 49. "Eight percent of Jordan's population is Christian. Christians are mostly of the Eastern Orthodox and Greek Catholics sects, followed by a number of Roman Catholics and Protestants. "
Christianity Jordan 232,000 8.00% - - 1987 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies 2.9 million [total pop.] (1987). Mostly Sunni Muslim; about 2,000 Shia Muslims. Christians (Eastern Orthodox, Greek Orthodox, Greek Catholics, Roman Catholics, a few Protestants) are 5 to 8 % of population. Also: small groups, such as Druzes, Bahais.
Christianity Jordan 250,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Christianity Jordan 345,971 8.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Sunni Muslim 92%, Christian 8%; Total population: 4,324,638.
Christianity Jordan 308,000 7.00% - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999), pg. 60. Pg. 60: "Jordan's population of 4.4 million (not including the West Bank)... About 7 per cent of the nation's people are Christian... "
Christianity Jordan - 7.00% - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999), pg. 67. "Among these are various Christian communities who make up about 7 per cent of Jordan's population. They live mostly in Amman and around Madaba, Kerak, Salt and Ajlun. A large percentage of Jordan's Christians are members of the Greek Orthodox Church... Jordan has a substantial number of Roman Catholics, as well as others of the Catholic faith from Armenia and Syria. Various Protestant denominations are also found in Amman and in small numbers elsewhere. "
Church of the Nazarene Jordan 331 - 7
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site: Nazarene World Mission Society Church Statistics: Churches; 8 Jan. 1998; total population: 3,813,000
Circassians Jordan - - - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Jordan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988), pg. 49. "The vast majority of Jordan is Muslim--over 90% of the population is made up of Sunni Muslims... 8% of Jordan's population is Christian... A small number of Druze... live near the Syrian border, along with Samaritans and Circassians... the Circassians are Sunni Muslims. "
Circassians Jordan - - - - 1989 Foster, Leila Merrell. Jordan (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1991), pg. 94. "The largest [ethnic] minority is the Circassians who came from Russia when the ottoman Turks resettled them in Jordan in the late 19th and 20th centuries. They are tall, light skinned, often with blond hair and blue eyes, and have adopted Western-style dress. Also, they are abandoning their traditional language, Cherkess, in order to adopt Arabic. Many Circassians are in the armed forces. One elite unit hade up of this group has special uniforms reflecing their Caucasus origin with black fur hats, long coats, riding boots, and long daggers. They are a royal honor guard. Intermarriage with Arabs isnot unusual since these people are Sunni Muslims. Circassian traditions include inheritance of all the property by the oldest son and a ceremonial stealing of the bribe. "
Circassians Jordan - - - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999), pg. 60, 63. Pg. 60: "Jordan's population of 4.4 million (not including the West Bank)... The vast majority of inhabitants are of Arab origin, most of whom follow Islam and are of the Sunni branch. About 7 per cent of the nation's people are Christian; another small percentage is made up of Circassians (Sunni Muslims brought by the Ottomans from the Caucasus to what is now Jordan). "; Pg. 63: "Many thousands of Circassians now live in Jordan. Their groups are spread through Amman, Jerash, Wadi el-Seer, Suweilih, Zarqa, Azraq, and other parts of the north... Today Circassians have managed to carve a niche for themselves in Jordan. They are a well-educated and socially responsible people who have sought to develop and improve society. "
Druze Jordan 12,000 - - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: UNREACHED PEOPLES `79 -- David C. Cook pub. co.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) 33,000 in Israel. (300,000 total). LOCATION: Also 100,000 in Lebanon; 150,000 Syria; 12,000 in Jordan.
Druze Jordan - - - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Jordan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988), pg. 49. "The vast majority of Jordan is Muslim--over 90% of the population is made up of Sunni Muslims... 8% of Jordan's population is Christian... A small number of Druze--a secretive sect that branched off from Islam-- live near the Syrian border, along with Samaritans and Circassians. "
Druze Jordan 15,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 189. "Population figures are not exact, but estimates for Druze populations are: Lebanon, 300,000; Syria, 500,000; Israel, 85,000...; Jordan, 15,000... "
Druze Jordan - - - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999), pg. 66. "Although most Middle East Druze reside in Lebanon, Syria and Israel, a small number live in Jordan, mainly near the Syrian border. Azraq has a Druze community. "
Eastern Orthodox Jordan - 2.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 3,813,000
Greek Orthodox Jordan 79,340 2.00% - - 1989 Foster, Leila Merrell. Jordan (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1991), pg. 119. "Religion: About 95% of Jordanians are Sunni Muslims and most of the others (about 4%) are Christians, half of whom are Arab-speaking Greek Orthodox... Population: Estimated 1989 population - 3,967,000, including 1,000,000 on the West Bank. "
Greek Orthodox Jordan - - - - 1989 Foster, Leila Merrell. Jordan (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1991), pg. 95. "Christian groups date back to the time of early Christianity. They represent different denominations, the largest being the Greek Orthodox, whose worship is conducted in both Greek and Arabic. "
Greek Orthodox Jordan - - - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999), pg. 67. "Among these are various Christian communities who make up about 7 per cent of Jordan's population. They live mostly in Amman and around Madaba, Kerak, Salt and Ajlun. A large percentage of Jordan's Christians are members of the Greek Orthodox Church... "
Islam Jordan 2,700,000 93.00% - - 1978 Welch, Alford T. "Islam " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 164-165. [Original src: Weeks, R. (ed.), "Muslim Peoples: A World Ethnographic Survey " (1978).] Table: "Approximate Muslim populations and percentages of total populations "
Islam Jordan 3,468,400 92.00% - - 1983 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986), pg. 204. "Population: Estimated 3,770,000 in 1984-85, including approximately 972,000 under Israeli occupation on the West Bank. Religion: 92% Sunni Moslem, 8% Christian. "
Islam Jordan 3,000,000 95.00% - - 1986 *LINK* Web site: "Arabic Paper "; web page: "Muslim Countries of the World " (viewed 15 June 1999). [Written 1998.] [NOTE: Unreliable statistical methodology.] "In 1986... Muslim Education Trust organization [U.K.] obtained... 1971 census & [info. from] Embassies of the respective countires... 1971 census showed the Independent Muslim countries pop. was around 784.5 Million. "; "...add (784.5M + 308M [minority Muslim countries]) = 1092.5 Million Muslims in 1971 "; Table shows country, "population " [number of Muslims in the country], & % Muslim. Total adds up to 896,080,000, so these figures are apparently intended to be estimates for 1986.
Islam Jordan 3,768,650 95.00% - - 1989 Foster, Leila Merrell. Jordan (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1991), pg. 119. "Religion: About 95% of Jordanians are Sunni Muslims and most of the others (about 4%) are Christians, half of whom are Arab-speaking Greek Orthodox... Population: Estimated 1989 population - 3,967,000, including 1,000,000 on the West Bank. "
Islam Jordan - 93.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Islam Jordan 3,990,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Islam Jordan 3,978,667 92.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Sunni Muslim 92%, Christian 8%; Total population: 4,324,638.
Islam Jordan - 94.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 3,813,000
Islam Jordan - 92.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Wholesome Words: Worldwide Missions " by Stephen Ross, "First Edition, 1998 "; [original sources: The World Book Encyclopedia, c1998.] Table: "Major Muslim Countries of the World "
Islam Jordan 4,180,000 95.00% - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999), pg. 313. "The state religion is Islam, as indicated by the Constitution. The majority of the population (95%) are Sunni Muslim. "
Islam Jordan 3,861,500 91.40% - - 2000 K. F. Bin Mohd Noor. "Muslims Statistics... for Year 2000 " [orig. src: Barrett. World Christian Encyclopedia, 1982] Table
Jehovah's Witnesses Jordan 61 0.00% 2
units
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Adherent count here is from "1983 Peak Publishers " column
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Jordan 153 - 2
units
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Data from columns: "No. of congs. " and "Memorial attendance "
Jordan Baptist Convention Jordan 1,000 - 12
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
other Jordan 158,680 4.00% - - 1989 Foster, Leila Merrell. Jordan (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1991), pg. 119. "Religion: About 95% of Jordanians are Sunni Muslims and most of the others (about 4%) are Christians, half of whom are Arab-speaking Greek Orthodox... Population: Estimated 1989 population - 3,967,000, including 1,000,000 on the West Bank. "
Palestinians Jordan 1,560,000 60.00% - - 1985 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Jordan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988), pg. 39. "In 1985 the population estimate for the country was over 2.6 million... One of the most important power struggles is between the Bedouin--the original inhabitants of the country--and the Palestinians, who now represents over 60% of the population. "
Palestinians Jordan 1,300,000 - - - 1990 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 295. "1.3 million Palestinians live in Jordan and have Jordanian citizenship. "
Protestant Jordan 10,000 - - - 1972 Marty, Martin E. Protestantism (History of Religion Series). New York: Hold, Rinehart and Winston (1972), pg. 13. "There are fewer than 10,000 Protestants in Jordan, but Jordan is aware of Protestantism because of its involvement with international issues and various religious rationales relating to its neighbor and enemy, Isreal. "
Protestant Jordan - 0.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 3,813,000
Samaritans Jordan - - 1
unit
- 1966 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 112. "The second great event... was the Israeli capture of Nablus in 1967. Before the Six Day War, the two Samaritan communities had been separated by an international border. Holon's Samaritans were only allowed to visit Nablus on Passover. Even that pilgrimage had been forbidden in the early years after 1948. Later, it was subject to Jordanian whims. "
Samaritans Jordan - - - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Jordan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988), pg. 49. "A small number of Druze... live near the Syrian border, along with Samaritans and Circassians. The Samaritans are descendants of an ancient Jewish sect... "
Samaritans Jordan - - - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999), pg. 67. "There are also a few small communities of Samarians, people claiming to belong to an ancient Jewish sect, with descent that stems from the House of Joseph. They accept the first five books of the Bible's teachings -- the Pentateuch -- refusing to regard any others as credible. "
Shiite Jordan 2,000 0.07% - - 1987 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies 2.9 million [total pop.] (1987). Mostly Sunni Muslim; about 2,000 Shia Muslims. Christians (Eastern Orthodox, Greek Orthodox, Greek Catholics, Roman Catholics, a few Protestants) are 5 to 8 % of population. Also: small groups, such as Druzes, Bahais.
Sunni Jordan 3,468,400 92.00% - - 1983 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986), pg. 204. "Population: Estimated 3,770,000 in 1984-85, including approximately 972,000 under Israeli occupation on the West Bank. Religion: 92% Sunni Moslem, 8% Christian. "
Sunni Jordan 2,340,000 90.00% - - 1985 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Jordan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988), pg. 49. "The vast majority of Jordan is Muslim--over 90% of the population is made up of Sunni Muslims... "
Sunni Jordan 2,610,000 90.00% - - 1987 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies 2.9 million [total pop.] (1987). Mostly Sunni Muslim; about 2,000 Shia Muslims. Christians (Eastern Orthodox, Greek Orthodox, Greek Catholics, Roman Catholics, a few Protestants) are 5 to 8 % of population. Also: small groups, such as Druzes, Bahais.
Sunni Jordan - 93.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "


Jordan, continued

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