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Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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Israel, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Judaism Israel 4,100,000 82.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 318, 320. "Location: Israel; Population: 5 million "; Pg. 320: "The modern state of Israel was established in 1948 as a homeland for the Jews, so it is not surprising that 82% of the population is Jewish. "
Judaism Israel 4,600,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Jewish Communities of the World web site (1998) Table: World Jewry. "collected our data from from demographic and other academic studies, community reports, and up-dates in the general media... consulted with experts to verify findings before reaching our assessments and estimates. "
Judaism Israel - 81.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 5,438,000
Judaism Israel 4,663,770 83.00% - - 1999 Cahill, Mary Jane. Israel (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 55. "Israel has a population of 5.6 million people, 83% of whom are Jewish. Of these, 50% are native-born Israelis (called Sabras); the rest are from some 70 countries in Europe, the Western Hemisphere, and Asia or Africa. The two main Jewish ethnic groups are the Askhenazim, Jews of European descent, and the Sephardim, or so-called Oriental Jews, who are from the countries of the Near East and the Mediterranean basin, such as Turkey, Iran and Morocco. "
Judaism Israel 4,663,770 83.00% - - 1999 Cahill, Mary Jane. Israel (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 9. "Population: 5,619,000... Religions: Jewish, 83%; Muslim (mainly Sunni), 13%; Christian (mainly Greek and Roman Catholic), 2.5%; Druze and other minority religions, 1.5% "
Judaism - practicing Israel - 24.90% - - 2000 *LINK* AP. "Religious and secular Jews clash on daylight-saving time " in Deseret News (17 Feb 2000) "However, observant Jews, who make up about 30 percent of Israel's Jewish population, say daylight-saving time discourages people from observing religious ritual, such as morning prayers, which would have to be held an hour earlier than usual. " [Other sources indicate Israel is 83% Jewish. 30% of 83% is 24.9%]
Judaism - Russian Israel 1,500,000 - - - 1977 Bermant, Chaim. The Jews. New York: NY Times Books (1977), pg. 241. "About half of Israel's three million Jews can trace their origins to the same area [Russian Pale]... "
Judaism - secular Israel 1,500,000 41.00% - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 219. "There are around 14 million Jews in the world, but increasingly many of these follow secular practices, even in Israel where it is estimated that around half the Jewish population has secular convictions. Around 6 million of the world's Jews live in the U.S. and over 3 million in Israel. "
Judaism - secular Israel - 70.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Associated Press. "Religion around the world ", title of subsection: "ORTHODOX JEWS PRAY AT VIGIL IN PROTEST OF COURT RULINGS " in Desert News, Saturday, March 6, 1999 (viewed online 14 May 1999). "Orthodox Jews make up only 10% of Israel's population. But they control the parliament through political parties. The rulings put them at odds with secular Jews, who comprise 70% of the population. "
Judaism - secular Israel - - - - 1999 Cahill, Mary Jane. Israel (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 68-69. "Opposing this extreme [Orthodox] position are secular (nonreligious) Jews, who do not believe that Jewish beliefs should govern everyday life for all Jews... Secular Jews make up the majority of the population and have prevented the Orthodox Jews from creating a theocracy. "
Karaites Israel 10 - - - 1948 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 139. "The 'Karaite problem' has perplexed the Israeli government since the sect arrived in the country. Except for two Karaite families who lived in Jerusalem before independence, the first wave of about fifteen hundred immigrants arrived in 1949-50. "
Karaites Israel 10,000 - - - 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 121. "About ten thousand Karaites now live in Israel. Exact numbers are unavailable because Karaite law forbits their being counted in a census. Their status under Israeli law is ambiguous; they are considered Jews but have their own rabbis, chief rabbinate, national council, kosher slaughterers, mohels, and religious courts. They are not legally permitted to marry other Jews. "
Karaites Israel 20,000 - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999), pg. 121. "Karaites:... The Karaites were treated as full, though heretical Jews in the Middle Ages; many Rabbinic authorities permitted marriages between Rabbinites and Karaites. But eventually the breach between the two communities so widened that neither saw the other as belonging to the same religion. It has been estimated that there are around 20,000 Karaites in the State of Israel, organized as a separate religious community with its won religious authorities. "
kibbutzim Israel - - 1
unit
- 1909 Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990), pg. 183. "In 1909... the formation of the first kibbutz, Um Djuni (later called Degania), on malarial swampland by the Sea of Galilee, which by 1914 had more than 50 members. "
kibbutzim Israel 50 - - - 1914 Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990), pg. 183. "In 1909... the formation of the first kibbutz, Um Djuni (later called Degania), on malarial swampland by the Sea of Galilee, which by 1914 had more than 50 members. "
kibbutzim Israel 124,000 - - - 1978 "Judaism and Modernization " in Social Forces (Vol. 62:1, Sept. 1983), pg. 10-11, 27. "...the smallest of the 4 major kibbutz federations in Israel, HaKibbutz HaDati (RKF), the religious Zionist federation..., whose 16 settlements constituted about 5% of the total kibbutzim in Israel in 1982. "; [pg. 27] "In 1978 the total pop. of the RKF settlements was about 6,200. "
kibbutzim Israel - 3.00% 250
units
- 1983 Charing, Douglas. The Jewish World. London, UK: Silver Burdett Co. (1983), pg. 38. "not own anything for themselves, but instead shared everything in common... Today there are about 250 kibbutzim in Israel, but only 3% of the population actually live on them (although these include a great variety of people, even university teachers, writers and some government ministers). "
kibbutzim Israel - - 800
units
- 1988 Cahill, Mary Jane. Israel (series: Places and Peoples of the World). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1988), pg. 92. "There are more than 800 kibbutzim (the plural of kibbutz) in Israel, all carefully organized. "
kibbutzim Israel 116,000 - 270
units
- 1990 Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990), pg. 183. "There are now some 270 kibbutzim in Israel with a total population of 116,000. "
kibbutzim Israel - - 270
units
- 1999 Cahill, Mary Jane. Israel (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 92. "There are about 270 kibbutzim... in Israel. They attract volunteers from around the world. A kibbutz can have more than 1,000 members or as few as 40... Although the proportion of Israelis who live on kibbutzim has declined, the principles of kibbutz life still influence the nation. "
kibbutzim Israel - - - - 1999 "Kibbutz: 'Gathering', the collective, socialistic settlement in the state of Israel which had its origins in the early years of the 20th century. The kibbutz movement believed that the establishment of kibbutzim was the best method of reclaiming the land of Israel. The influence of the highly idealistic kibbutzniks was enormous and their important contribution was acknowledged from the days of early Zionism. It has to be appreciated that the kibbutzim was a secular movement, though obviously based on Jewish ideals, especially the ethical norms of Judaism. Most of the kibbutzim were and are largely unobservant of the Jewish rituals or, rather, they sought to develop a secular, nationalistic form of some observances and ritual, in the celebration of the festivals, for example, in a new form, and in the creation of new festivals based on the land. However, the Kibbutz Ha-Dati is an organization of religious kibbutzim... socialist ideal wedded to full observance of Jewish law. "
Mashhadi Jews Israel 6,000 - - - 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 80. "About half of all Mashhadis now live in Israel, some five to six thousand. "
Mashhadi Jews Israel - - 8
units
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 80. "Most Israeli Mashhadis live in or near Tel Aviv... In addition to the two old synagogues in Jerusalem, they now have four in Tel Aviv and one each in the nearby cities of Herzliya and B'nei Brak. "
Messianic Judaism Israel - - 8
units
- 1975 "Messianic Jews see 'significant increase' " in Dallas Morning News, 28 Aug. 1999; pg. 6G. "Messianic Jews... at the Aug. 12-17 meeting of the Lausanne Consultation on Jewish Evangelism in Hempstead, N.Y... Tuvya Zaretsky, the consultation's new president, said Messianic congregations in Israel have grown from 'six or eight' in the early 1970s to more than 35. "
Messianic Judaism Israel - - 36
units
- 1999 "Messianic Jews see 'significant increase' " in Dallas Morning News, 28 Aug. 1999; pg. 6G. "Messianic Jews... at the Aug. 12-17 meeting of the Lausanne Consultation on Jewish Evangelism in Hempstead, N.Y... Tuvya Zaretsky, the consultation's new president, said Messianic congregations in Israel have grown from 'six or eight' in the early 1970s to more than 35. "
Mizrachi Israel - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999), pg. 158. "Mizrachi: Religious Zionist movement founded in 1902. The name Mizrachi is a shortened form of the Hebrew words merkaz ruhani, 'spiritual centre,' and signifies that the aim of Zionism to establish a Jewish state is highly laudable but this State should serve not only as a political focus but also as a spiritual centre for world Jewry. The Mizrachi maxim gives expression to the movement's special emphasis: 'The Land of Israel for the people of Israel in accordance with the Torah of Israel.' The essential problem for the Mizrachi is posed by the obscurity of the final statement of its programme. How was a modern democratic State, comprising both religious and non-religious Jews, to be conducted in accordance with the 'Torah of Israel'? With the establishment of the State of Israel, the Mizrachi became the National Religious party (Mafdal) and still grapples, not very successfully, with this severe problem. "
Morning Bathers Israel - - - - 30 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 270-271. "After Jesus is born in Bethlehem, almost nothing is heard of him until he is baptized in the river Jordan by John the Baptist some 30 years later... Little is known about John except that he came from a sect of Morning Bathers or Baptists, one of several Jewish communities that offered Baptism as a form of forgiveness for sins prior to an expected end to historic time. "
Nazarenes Israel - - - - 100 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 386-387. "Ebionites ('Poor Ones'): Jews who believed that Jesus was the Messiah but kept many of their Jewish practices and split with Paul over his dismissal of Mosaic law or Torah. They believed that Jesus was human but not divine, accepted only the Gospel of Matthew, and disappeared after the 5th century. A similar group called the Nazarenes considered themselves Jews and believed in Jesus as Messiah, but they differed from the Ebionites in accepting Christ's divinity and supernatural birth. "
Orthodox Judaism Israel - 10.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Associated Press. "Religion around the world ", title of subsection: "ORTHODOX JEWS PRAY AT VIGIL IN PROTEST OF COURT RULINGS " in Desert News, Saturday, March 6, 1999 (viewed online 14 May 1999). "Orthodox Jews make up only 10% of Israel's population. But they control the parliament through political parties. The rulings put them at odds with secular Jews, who comprise 70% of the population. "
Orthodox Judaism Israel - - - - 1999 Cahill, Mary Jane. Israel (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 68-69. "Orthodox Jews... want Israeli society to function according to... biblical laws... Orthodox Jews make up only a small portion of the population. They live in their own neighborhoods and wear distinctive clothing: men and boys dress in black hats and suits with prayer shawls called tzitzit wrapped around their waists and style and their hair in long side curls called pais; women and girls wear long, simple dresses and headscarves. "
Orthodox Judaism Israel - 10.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Copans, Laurie (AP). "Finding Their Voice " in Salt Lake Tribune, 18 Sept. 1999 (viewed online 18 Sept. 1990). "Orthodox Jews, who make up at least 10 percent of the Israeli population, believe that Jewish law -- halacha -- was divinely revealed. "
Orthodox Judaism - seminaries for women Israel - - 18
units
- 1999 *LINK* Copans, Laurie (AP). "Finding Their Voice " in Salt Lake Tribune, 18 Sept. 1999 (viewed online 18 Sept. 1990). "Deep in an Orthodox neighborhood, 12 young students intently pore over thick religious texts just as Jewish scholars have for thousands of years -- with one major difference: They are women. Few such classes existed in Israel until a few years ago. Now there are 18 Orthodox seminaries for women. "
other Israel - 15.00% - - 1983 Charing, Douglas. The Jewish World. London, UK: Silver Burdett Co. (1983), pg. 38. "Most of Israel's citizens are Jews, but 15% of them are non-Jews, and that includes Muslims, Christians, Samaritans, Druze and Baha'i. Jerusalem, of course, is a very important religious centre for Christians and Muslims as well as Jews, and the city contains many churches and mosques as well as synagogues. "
other Israel - 16.67% - - 1987 Taitz, Emily & Sondra Henry. Israel: A Sacred Land (series: Discovering Our Heritage). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Dillon Press (1987), pg. 15-16. "One out of every six citizens of Israel is a non-Jew. He or she may be a Muslim or a Christian Arab, a Druze or a Samaritan. "
other Israel 63,000 1.50% - - 1988 Cahill, Mary Jane. Israel (series: Places and Peoples of the World). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1988), pg. 9. "Population: 4,200,000... Religions: Jewish, 83%; Muslim (mainly Sunni), 13%; Christian (mainly Greek and Roman Catholic), 2.5%; Druze and other minority religions, 1.5% "
other Israel 240,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; "other " = NOT Jewish or Muslim; includes the Golan Heights and East Jerusalem; excludes the West Bank and Gaza Strip
other Israel 84,285 1.50% - - 1999 Cahill, Mary Jane. Israel (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 9. "Population: 5,619,000... Religions: Jewish, 83%; Muslim (mainly Sunni), 13%; Christian (mainly Greek and Roman Catholic), 2.5%; Druze and other minority religions, 1.5% "
Palestinians Israel 700,000 - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 295. "Between 650,000 and 700,000 Palestinians are citizens of Israel and live in pre-1967 borders; 125,000 live in East Jerusalem. Just over 800,000 Palestinians live on the rest of the West Bank, and around 15% are refugees. There are 550,000 Palestinians in the Gaza Strip, and almost 70% of these live in refugee camps. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 30 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2177. "Pharisees. Described by the historian Josephus as 'a body of Jews who profess to be more religious than the rest and to explain the law more precisely'; they attached great importance to strict observance of the written law of Moses and the traditional law which had grown up around it; though attacked as pedants and hypocrites in the New Testament, they seem to have been admired by most Jews. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 30 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 466. Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton. "By the time of Jesus... There were three parties among the Jews. The Sadducees were willing to collaborate with the occupying power, the Zealots fomented rebellion, and the Pharisees would neither fraternize nor rebel but kept the law and waited for vindication at the hands of God. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 30 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "PHARISEES: a JEWISH religious GROUP, political party or SECT, that flourished at the time of JESUS and is depicted in the NEW TESTAMENT as excessively zealous in observing MOSAIC Law and hostile to Jesus' teachings. They appear to have believed in the RESURRECTION OF THE DEAD and such things as ANGELS which their main rivals, the SADDUCEES, denied. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 567. "Pharisees. Jewish religious party of the Second Temple period... Josephus attributes specific religious beliefs to them... A more detailed picture of the Pharisees, however, emerges from sources later than 70 A.D., and much controversy today surrounds their characterization during the Second Temple period. The NT references are especially derogatory and do not provide an accurate picture. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 264. Chapter: Judaism. "Pharisees: Sect that created the oral law to apply Mosaic law to contemporary situations. Modern Jews are descended from the Pharisees in the sense that the other sects died out after the destruction of the Second Temple. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. Oxtoby, Willard G. The Meaning of Other Faiths. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press (1983), pg. 25. "A second option saw the essence of Judaism as the observances one could carry out within the four walls of one's own home... This position... was the emphasis of the Pharisees, and it survived the destruction of the Temple and public institution. In fact, it became the mainstream of rabbinic Judaism and has characterized the practice of Judaism wherever it has been a minority community until our own times. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 100 C.E. Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999), pg. 178. "Pharisees: One of the three sects mentioned by Josephus as having flourished from the second century BCE to the early second century CE, the other two being the Sadducees and the Essenes. There is considerable uncertainty about the meaning of the term... According to both Josephus and the Talmud the two main theological differences between the Pharisees and the Sadducees were: the Pharisaic belief that Israel was given by God an Oral Torah, and the Pharisiac belief in the reality of the World to Come. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 500 C.E. Oxtoby, Willard G. The Meaning of Other Faiths. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press (1983), pg. 43. "The tradition of the Pharisees survived the Jewish war against Rome in the first century to become the basis of rabbinic law interpretation in the Talmud in the second through the sixth century. "
polygamy Israel - - - - 30 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "DIVORCE: the dissolution of marriage. Of all the world religions... More FUNDAMENTALIST groups usually totally deny the practice on Biblical grounds. One complicating factor is deciding exactly what constitutes a marriage. At the time of Jesus the JEWS practiced POLYGAMY thus undermining many of the more literalist interpretations of marriage as a sexual act. "
Protestant Israel - - - - 1972 Marty, Martin E. Protestantism (History of Religion Series). New York: Hold, Rinehart and Winston (1972), pg. 14. "...the actual Protestant population [in Israel] is extremely small. Many boards or agencies are represented without a single Israeli adherent, and the more successful ones number membership in the thousands. Israel is officially a Jewish state, with a strong Muslim and a smaller Uniate and Orthodox Christian representation. There is a certain Protestant presence, but the positive shaping of the culture is entirely in other hands. "
Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia Israel - - 7
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site (1998) Counted listings in directory of parishes.
Sadducees Israel - - - - 30 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 466. Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton. "By the time of Jesus... There were three parties among the Jews. The Sadducees were willing to collaborate with the occupying power, the Zealots fomented rebellion, and the Pharisees would neither fraternize nor rebel but kept the law and waited for vindication at the hands of God. "
Sadducees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 640. "Sadducees... They disappeared in A.D. 70 with the destruction of the Temple. Probably attached to the upper classes, the landed gentry, and merchants, and mostly constituted of priests, the Sadducees represented a conservative aristocracy... "
Sadducees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "SADDUCEES: originating in the second century B.C. They were a religious and political GROUP, which rejected such BELIEFS as the RESURRECTION, ANGELS and SPIRITS, that disappeared after the destruction of Jerusalem in 70. In the NEW TESTAMENT they are depicted as the opponents of JESUS. "
Sadducees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 265. Chapter: Judaism. "Sadducees: Sect that was at odds with the Pharisees because they supported only the written law, strictly interpreted. They centered around Temple life, and after the destruction of the Second Temple in AD 70, they soon faded away. "
Sadducees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. Oxtoby, Willard G. The Meaning of Other Faiths. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press (1983), pg. 24-25. "One option was to treat the Temple worship--its ritual and sacrifices--as the essential thing about Judaism and to collaborate with the Roman rulers in civic matters. This was the position of the Sadducees, and it remained an option as long as the Temple stood, until A.D. 70. "
Sadducees Israel - - - - 100 C.E. Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999), pg. 213. "Sadducees: Heb. Tzaddukim, one of the three main parties in the late Second Temple period, the others being the Pharisees and the Essenes... " [More.]
Samaritans Israel - - - - 30 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 273. "But Jesus stretches the definition further, telling one of his most famous parables about a Samaritan--one of a mixed race living between Galilee and Judea who were especially loathed by the Jews after some Samaritans had desecrated the Temple... "
Samaritans Israel - - 1
unit
- 1966 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 112. "The second great event... was the Israeli capture of Nablus in 1967. Before the Six Day War, the two Samaritan communities had been separated by an international border. Holon's Samaritans were only allowed to visit Nablus on Passover. Even that pilgrimage had been forbidden in the early years after 1948. Later, it was subject to Jordanian whims. "
Samaritans Israel - - 2
units
- 1968 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 112. "The second great event... was the Israeli capture of Nablus in 1967. Before the Six Day War, the two Samaritan communities had been separated by an international border. Holon's Samaritans were only allowed to visit Nablus on Passover. Even that pilgrimage had been forbidden in the early years after 1948. Later, it was subject to Jordanian whims. "
Samaritans Israel 500 - 2
units
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 99. In Israel, "in what is now the city of Nablus on the West Bank of the Jordan River, the tiny sect of Samaritans has survived since biblical times... They have lived as an independent people for more than two thousand years: as neither Moslems, Christians, nor Jews. Five hundred Samaritans survive today... About half of them still live in Nablus; the other half live in the Tel Aviv suburb Holon. "
Samaritans Israel - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "SAMARITANS: the descendants of the Northern kingdom of ISRAEL who intermarried with local people thus gaining the scorn and enmity of ORTHODOX JEWS who retained their racial purity. They refused to recognize the TEMPLE in JERUSALEM as the center of WORSHIP, and built their own Temple on Mount Gerizim. The Samaritans accept their own version of PENTATEUCH but reject other parts of the HEBREW BIBLE. "
Samaritans Israel - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999), pg. 215. "Samaritans: The descendants of the people settled in Samaria, in the Northern Kingdom, after the ten tribes had been deported by the king of Assyria in 722 BCE. The verse in the book of 2 Kings (17:24) states: 'The king of Assyria brought [people] from Babylon, Cuthah, Avva, Hamath and Sepharvim, and he settled them in the towns of Samaria in place of the Israelites; they took possession of Samaria and dwelt in its towns.' "
Samaritans Israel - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999), pg. 215. "The passage continues that these foreign peoples worshipped their own gods but God let loose lions among them, as result of which the king of Assyria ordered a priest to be sent to teach them the worship of the true God. After the name Cuthah, one of the places from which these people came, the Samaritans are called Cuthim... The Rabbis understood the story in the book of Kings to mean that the Cuthim were eventually converted to Judaism, the only question being whether they were true converts or only 'lion converts', that is, never really converted to the true faith but only pretending to have been converted out of their fear of the lions. The conclusion in the Talmud is that their descendants are fully Jewish even though they do not keep al the precepts. Nevertheless, according to the Talmud (Hullin 6a), Rabbi Meir, hearing that some Samaritans had worshipped a dove on Mount Gerizim, declared that all Samaritans must henceforth be treated as if they were idolaters. "
Samaritans Israel - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999), pg. 215. "Samaritans: ...The story of the dove is, of course, legendary. The Samaritans were monotheists and worshipped God on Mount Gerizim. Behind all this are echoes of the conflict in ancient times between the Samaritans and the Jews, the Samaritans claiming, in fact, that they were the descendants of the ancient Israelites and that the story in the book of Kings is a false account of their origins. The book of Nehemiah (ch. 4) relates how the Samaritans sought to prevent the Jews rebuilding Jerusalem after the return from the Babylonian exile.

For the Samaritans the central holy place is not Jerusalem but Mount Gerizim in Samaria. For them, too, only the Pentatech, of which they have their own version, is sacred and they reject the prophetic and the other books of the Bible. "

Samaritans - attendance Israel 500 - - - 500 C.E. Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 99, 115. Pg. 99: "Five hundred Samaritans survive today... "; pg. 115: "There are no 'secular' Samaritans, either. 'We have one hundred percent synagogue attendance,' Benny [Tsedaka] said. 'If someone doesn't show up we all run to his house to find out what's wrong.' "
Scientology Israel - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web page (OPPOSING VIEW): "Scientology Worldwide " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999); "Last Update on 10th Feb. 1999 " Number here ( "# congregations ") represent total of all orgs: Dianetic Centers, Celebrity Centers, missions, etc.; "CoS web sites have lists of Missions (1998) & Orgs (1996) from which the Table below is derived. Original concept and research by 'Inducto'. "
Sephardic Judaism Israel - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 671. "Sephardim have persisted as a dwindling but prosperous and recognizable minority among Western Jews. Those of Arab lands, however, suffered from the cultural and economic decline of their locale and, after 1948, from growing Arab hostility to the State of Israel. Anticipating little future in the Muslim world, masses of these Jews emigrated to Israel. The preponderant majority were absorbed, though integration efforts have resulted in tensions difficult to alleviate because of Israel's beleagered status. Some measure of success has been lately attained, yet disparities between Western and Oriental Jews remain one of Israel's pressing problems. "
Sephardic Judaism Israel 2,017,692 49.20% - - 1983 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986), pg. 148,151. "Population: 4,101,000 "; "Although the Sephardim represent 60% of Israel's Jewish population... " [Other sources indicate Jewish population of Israel for this time at 82%. 60% of 82% = 49.2%]
Sephardic Judaism Israel 935,000 21.25% - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Israel ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988), pg. 38-39. "Jews now make up about 85% of Israel's 4.4 million people... Nearly 50% of Israel's Jews were born in the country. Another 25% were born in Europe and are referred to as Ashkenazim, or European Jews. The rest--generally called Sephardic Jews--came from other Middle Eastern or North African countries. Most of the first immigrants to Israel came from Europe, bringing with them Western culture... After 1950, however, most of the Jewish immigrants came from the surrounding Arab-dominated world... Like Israel's Arab minority, the Sephardim are generally less educated and have a lower economic status than the Ashkenazim... Since the late 1970s, more Sephardim have held both local and national government positions, and their standard of living has begun to improve. "
Seventh-day Adventist Israel - 0.00% - - 1993 *LINK* web site: "Adventist Images "; web page: "Membership Density " (viewed 25 June 1999); "Copyright 1996 - Pacific Union Conference of Seventh Day Adventists " "Adventist Believers - High and Low Density "; Table: "Ratio of church membership to country population "; Ratio: 1:58,824
Sicarii Israel - - - - 6 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 266. Chapter: Judaism. "Zealots: Sect founded in AD 6 by Judah the Galilean protesting Roman rule and taxes. The Zealots believed in violence as a legitimate tool against the occupying Romans and their Jewish collaborators. The terrorist fringe of Zealots, who carried concealed daggers and committed political assassinations, were called Sicarii by the Romans. "
Sunni Israel 608,377 13.86% - - 1987 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Officially estimated in October 1987 at 4,389,600 [total pop.], of whom about 82 percent Jews. Substantial Sunni Muslim (about 77 percent of non-Jewish population) and smaller Christian and Druze communities also present.
Templars Israel - - - - 1119 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 750. "Templars. The Poor Knights of Christ and the Temple of Solomon; a military religious order, originally housed near Solomon's Temple, founded in 1119 by Hugh de Payens, who vowed to protect pilgrims en route from the coast of Jerusalem. The order received vast holdings and established banking centers to support its enlarged purpose of defending the Holy Land. "
unknown Israel - 2.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "; Listed as "Unspecified "
Venta Prieta Jews Israel 8 - - - 1980 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 23. "We have eight people living in Israel now. Two have married Israeli girls. They had to convert, but only in the mikveh--the same as Rabbi Lerer makes us do. "
Zealots Israel - - - - 6 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 266. Chapter: Judaism. "Zealots: Sect founded in AD 6 by Judah the Galilean protesting Roman rule and taxes. The Zealots believed in violence as a legitimate tool against the occupying Romans and their Jewish collaborators. "


Israel, continued

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