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Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Vadgalai India - - - - 1130 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "VADGALAI: followers of RAMUNUJA who emphasized that human effort is the condition of divine GRACE. Their view became known as the 'Monkey Principle' from the fact that a young monkey clings to its mother as she moves about. Thus it is through striving for SALVATION and by fulfillment of VEDIC religious duties that one attains LIBERATION. "
Vaisesika India - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "VAISESIKA: one of the six schools of HINDU PHILOSOPHY which expounded an atomistic interpretation of the UNIVERSE. Around the tenth century it merged with the NYYA School to promote a FORM of THEISM based on METAPHYSICS and taught that GOD is the BEING who combines and separates the atoms of the universe. "
Vaishnavism India - - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973), pg. 165. "Vaishnavas, followers of the Hindu god Vishnu, forming one of the main branches of Hinduism. Vaishnava sects and their temples are found in all parts of India. "
Vaishnavism India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 781. "Vaisnavism... Religious groups and theologies having as deity one or another of Vishnu's avatars... These groups may be found in all parts of India... "; Pg. 782: "Although the initial wide-ranging enthusiasm which surrounded early Vaisnavism has died out in most parts of India over the centuries, Vaisnavism remains one of the most powerful forces in the religious and intellectual life of that part of the world. "
Vaishnavism India - - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987), pg. 194. "There are many different Vaishnava groups all over India. Some of the major ones are the Shrivaishnavas and Dvaitins of southern India, the followers of Vallabha in western India, and several groups following the teaching of Chaitanya in Bengal. The groups in the south mostly worship Vishnu, Rama or Vishnu's consort, whereas the groups in the north usually worship Krishna. "
Vaishnavism India - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "VAISNAVISM: the [worship] of VISHNU which emphasizes BHAKTI and the WORSHIP of GODS like KRISHNA. It is credited with producing the BHAGAVAD-GITA and an extensive devotional literature rich in MYTH and SYMBOLISM. Its chief rival in the HINDU TRADITION is SAIVISM which arose around the same period of time--300 B.C. to 300 A.D. "
Vaishnavism India - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 54. "The largest modern Hindu sect, Vaishnavism, prevailed in the north of India (although today members of the three major sects mostly live side by side)... The sect spread to the south after the 11th century... "
Vaisya India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 782. "Vaisya. A generic term for members of the third division of traditional Hindu society. Initially Vaisyas were traders and husbandmen, but today most do not engage in agricultural work, though they may own land or be involved in commerce and banking. Like Brahmins and Ksatriyas, the Vaisyas are among the Twice Born castes, and they tend to be strict in the observance of caste rules and dietary prescriptions. Hence, vegetarianism is a hallmark of the majority of Vaisyas. "
Vaisya India - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "VAISYA: the lowest of the three TWICE BORN within the CASTE system of HINDUISM. They are the acceptable workers, traders and merchants and from whose labors the members of the other castes live. "
Vamamargis India - - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957), pg. 24. "Besides the major Hindu sects of Vishnu and Shiva, there are many minor ones. The strongest, in numbers and influence, is... of Shakti whose followers worship 'God in the aspect of mother.'... divided into two main groups, the Dakshinamargis, or followers of the right-hand way, and Vamamargis, or left-handed worshipers. The first take the usual path of renunciation of the world, the second the unusual path toward enjoyment of life. The Dakshinamargis do openly what they profess, the Vamamargis keep their rituals secret. "
Vedic religion India - - - - -1500 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 789. "Vedic Hinduism. The earliest level of Hinduism; it developed among the Indo-Aryan-speaking communities of northwest and north central India in the last half of the second millennium B.C. and flourished in large areas of the entire subcontinent during the first millennium B.C. In a broader sense Vedic Hinduism may also refer to those forms of classical, medieval, and modern Hinduism that remain faithful to one or more of the textual, ritual, or theological traditions of this ancient Vedic period. "
Vedic religion India - - - - -1500 B.C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "VEDIC RELIGION: the religion of the ancient ARYAN invaders of India which is found in the G VEDA and other early Indian literature... rich in MYTH and RITUAL involving GODS, SACRIFICE and heroic deeds. Life affirming and worldly and very different from later HINDUISM. Later Vedic religion tends towards MONOTHEISM and eventually develops through a series of textual reinterpretations through such works as the UPANISHADS... "
vegetarian India - 20.00% - - 1998 *LINK* "Diaspora " in Hinduism Today International (May 1998) "Only 20% of Indians are vegetarians, though India has overall one of the lowest meat consumption rates in the world. "
Vipassana Meditation Centers India - - 26
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in India " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) counted meditation centers listed in directory
Zoroastrianism India 101,778 0.03% - - 1921 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 368. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.]
Zoroastrianism India 109,752 0.03% - - 1931 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 368. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.]
Zoroastrianism India 77,000 - - - 1976 Eliade, Mircea & Ioan P. Couliano. The Eliade Guide to World Religions. Harper Collins: New York (1991). Pg. 254. "According to a 1976 poll, the total number of Zoroastrians in the world reached 130,000, of which 77,000 lived in India, 25,000 in Iran, 5,000 in Pakistan, and 23,000 in the United States. "
Zoroastrianism India 120,000 - - - 1978 Rice, Edward. Ten Religions of the East. New York: Four Winds Press (1978), pg. 41. "When the British made Bombay the center of trade, the Parsees followed. Today they are a small but prosperous community of some 120,000 people... "
Zoroastrianism India - 0.01% - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 827. "Nonetheless, the Zoroastrians today, though members of a minority that numbers less than one in a thousand in the population of Iran and only about one in ten thousand in India, are highly educated and enjoy an influence out of all proportion to their numbers. "
Zoroastrianism India 100,000 - - - 1983 Carmody, Denise Lardner & John Tully Carmody. Western Ways to the Center: An Introduction to Western Religions; Belmont, California: Wadsworth Publishing Co. (1983), pg. 29. "True enough, less than 10,000 Zoroastrians remain in Iran (perhaps 100,000 in India). "
Zoroastrianism India 150,000 - - - 1983 Carmody, Denise Lardner & John Tully Carmody. Western Ways to the Center: An Introduction to Western Religions; Belmont, California: Wadsworth Publishing Co. (1983), pg. 33. "In the 8th century significant numbers emigrated to India... Their descendance have survived... Known as Parsis, they now number about 150,000, with the largest concentration in Bombay... one of India's best educated... groups. "
Zoroastrianism India 100,000 - - - 1983 Hopfe, Lews M. Religions of the World, Macmillan Publishing Co.: New York (1983) [3rd edition], pg. 313. "Today the religion... is kept by an insignificant minority (approx. 11,000) in Iran known as Gabars..., by a larger minority (approx. 100,000) in India, and in other small communities around the world totaling approximately 254,000. "
Zoroastrianism India 100,000 - - - 1986 Pastva, Loretta. Great Religions of the World; Winona, Minnesota: Saint Mary's Press, Christian Brothers Publications (1995) [9th printing. 1st printing in 1986], pg. 142. "Living in and around Bombay, they have grown to over a hundred thousand members. "
Zoroastrianism India 90,000 - - - 1990 Noss., David S. & John B. Noss. A History of the World's Religions. Macmillian (1990). pg. 371. "More fortunate have been the Parsis of India, who number today about ninety thousand souls, most of them in Bombay and neighboring areas. "
Zoroastrianism India 130,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Zoroastrianism India 92,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web page: "Frequently asked questions on Zoroastrianism and the Avesta " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999) "Last figure I saw was around 140,000. Largest populations are in India & Iran. J Hinnells' booklet Zoroastrianism and the Parsis (p.8) has 17,000 in Iran and 92,000 in India. North American Zoroastrians: around 5,000. "
Zoroastrianism India 100,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "United Church of Canada Inter-Faith Dialogue "; web page: "Zoroastrianism " (viewed 19 Feb. 1999), written by Fritz B. Voll, "Updated: Tue Jun 9 23:39:38 1998 " "The estimated number of Zoroastrians in the world is around 200,000. The homeland of Zoroastrianism is Persia, now Iran. More than half of the Zoroastrians live in India, where they are known as 'Parsees' (people of Persia). "
miscellaneous regional info India - - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page: "The 'Right' India Strategy? " by Justin D. Long, 1998 (viewed 5 March 1999) "About three-quarters of India's population are Hindus, 10% Muslim, and 6% Christian. Further, many people groups that are small percentage-wise are still large numbers-wise. Any group with just 0.2% of the population equals more than a million people, and Sikhs, Tribals, Buddhists, Jains, the non-religious, Baha'is and atheists all claim at least that many. "
Christianity India - Khasi 420,830 67.00% - - 1981 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 391-392. "Khasi; Location: India (Meghalaya state); Population: 628,104 (1981); Language: Khasi; Religion: Christianity; native animist beliefs "; "Khasi religion may be described as animistic, focusing on the propitation of spirits--both good and evil... Although many aspects of traditional Khasi religion survive, the majority of Khasi have adopted Christianity. Missionary work began in the region during the late 19th century and has been so successful that today over 67% of Khasi profess to be Christian. "
Khasi religion India - Khasi 207,274 33.00% - - 1981 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 391-392. "Khasi; Location: India (Meghalaya state); Population: 628,104 (1981); Language: Khasi; Religion: Christianity; native animist beliefs "; "Khasi religion may be described as animistic, focusing on the propitation of spirits--both good and evil... Although many aspects of traditional Khasi religion survive, the majority of Khasi have adopted Christianity. Missionary work began in the region during the late 19th century and has been so successful that today over 67% of Khasi profess to be Christian. "
Christianity India - Konds - 3.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 408-409. "Konds: Alternate Name: Khond; Kondh; Kandha; Ku (self-reference); Location: India (Orissa region); Population: 1 million (1981); Religion: Animism; small number of Christians "; "Kond religion is animistic in nature. The Sun is worshiped as bura Pennu, the chief of the Kond deities and the source of all good in the world... "; "Christian missionary activity among the Konds is reflected in the roughly 3% of the population who claim the Christian faith. "
Christianity India - Naga - 50.00% - - 1947 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 553. "Although many elements of traditional religion survive among the Naga, most are christian. Missionaries (American Baptists, in particular) who entered the naga Hills in the 19th century set out to convert eh naked, headhunting tribes they found living there. By 1947, about half of the Naga population had accepted Christianity. This number has been increasing in recent decades, and the 1981 census showed 92.97% of the Naga in Nagaland State as Christian. "
Chishti Sufism India - north - - - - 1300 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 722. "The time of greatest influence for the Sufi orders... Ottoman and Mogul empires... 1500-1800. The number of Muslims affiliated with Sufi brotherhoods during this period was certainly not less than half the population and may have been as high as 80 percent... From the thirteenth century on, North India was populated with the convent-tomb complexes of the Chishtiyya and the Suhrawardiyya. "
Krishna worship India - north - - - - 1540 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 781. "The Krishna sect... There are many schools of Krishna-centered Vaisnavism across the subcontinent... Some of them, such as that represented by the poet Surdas (1483-1563) in North India, have the child Krishna as their deity. "
Suhrawardi India - north - - - - 1300 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 722. "The time of greatest influence for the Sufi orders... Ottoman and Mogul empires... 1500-1800. The number of Muslims affiliated with Sufi brotherhoods during this period was certainly not less than half the population and may have been as high as 80 percent... From the thirteenth century on, North India was populated with the convent-tomb complexes of the Chishtiyya and the Suhrawardiyya. "
Sunga India - north - - - - -73 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 725. "Sunga. Name of a North Indian dynasty which held power from 185-73 B.C., having its capital at Pataliputra and later at Vidisa. Direct successors to the Buddhist Mauryas, the Sunga were Brahmin reactionaries who instigated a campaign of persecution against the Buddhists. Externally, the dynasty found its main enemy in the Bactrian Greeks, prolonged contact with whom seems to have significantly influenced the art of the period. Plagued by wars with the Greeks and by internal dissolution, the dynasty gave way in 73 B.C. to that of the Kanvas. "
Apa Tanis India - northeast - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 709. "The Apa Tanis of Northeast India have a particularly clear idea of the netherworld, and their shamans and priests claim to visit in their dreams the regions inhabited by gods, spirits, and departed human beings. Anyone who died a natural death is thought to go to Neli, a place below the earth which looks very much like the Apa Tani valley. On the way to Neli the dead come to the house of Nelkiri, the guardian of the underworld, and there they meet their kinsmen and friends who preceded them in death... Though Neli is a real underworld, it has no gloomy associations but is thought to be a good and happy place. "
Konyak Nagas India - northeast - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 708. "The Konyak Nagas of Northeast India refer to the supreme being as Gawang... "
Christianity India - Oraons 401,189 21.50% - - 1981 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 603, 605. "The Oraons are concentrated in southwestern Bihar and neighboring areas of Orissa, and in Madhya Pradesh States. In Madhya Pradesh, they are also known as Dhanka and Dhangad. Numbers of Oraons have migrated... to areas of West Bengal... A few live in Tripura State... The 1981 Census places the total number of Oroans at 1,865,995 people. "; Pg. 605: "Christians now make up one-fifth or the Oraon population (21.5% according to the 1981 Census). "
Hinduism India - Oraons 1,119,597 60.00% - - 1981 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 603, 605. "The Oraons are concentrated in southwestern Bihar and neighboring areas of Orissa, and in Madhya Pradesh States. In Madhya Pradesh, they are also known as Dhanka and Dhangad. Numbers of Oraons have migrated... to areas of West Bengal... A few live in Tripura State... The 1981 Census places the total number of Oroans at 1,865,995 people. "; Pg. 605: "Census returns show that nearly 60% of Oraons are now Hindu. "
Kabir Panth India - Oraons - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 605. "There are a number of Hinduized cults, known as bhagats, found within traditional Oraon society... The Kabirpanthi sect (followers of the 15th-century reformer Kabir) and the Tana Bhagat are two of the more important of these Hindu groups among the Oraons. Census returns show that nearly 60% of Oraons are now Hindu. "
Tana Bhagat India - Oraons - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 605. "There are a number of Hinduized cults, known as bhagats, found within traditional Oraon society... The Kabirpanthi sect (followers of the 15th-century reformer Kabir) and the Tana Bhagat are two of the more important of these Hindu groups among the Oraons. Census returns show that nearly 60% of Oraons are now Hindu. "
Chenchus India - south - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Speakers of Dravidian languages are found mainly in South India and include primitive hunters and food gatherers such as Chenchus and Kadars... "
Gonds India - south - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Speakers of Dravidian languages are found mainly in South India and include primitive hunters and food gatherers such as Chenchus and Kadars, as well as relatively advanced farming peoples such as Gonds and Oraons. "
Kadars India - south - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Speakers of Dravidian languages are found mainly in South India and include primitive hunters and food gatherers such as Chenchus and Kadars... "
Oraons India - south - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Speakers of Dravidian languages are found mainly in South India and include primitive hunters and food gatherers such as Chenchus and Kadars, as well as relatively advanced farming peoples such as Gonds and Oraons. "
Anglican India - Todas 200 19.19% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 768-769. "Todas: Location: India (primarily Tamil Nadu state); Population: 1,042 (1988); Language: Toda; Religion: Centered on the sanctity of the buffalo "; "...very small community of Toda Christians. It numbers perhaps 200 persons who follow the Anglican rites of the Church of South India. "
Christianity India - Todas 200 19.19% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 768-769. "Todas: Location: India (primarily Tamil Nadu state); Population: 1,042 (1988); Language: Toda; Religion: Centered on the sanctity of the buffalo "; "Christian missionary efforts among the Todas at the turn of the century have resulted in the emergence of a very small community of Toda Christians. It numbers perhaps 200 persons who follow the Anglican rites of the Church of South India. "
Church of South India India - Todas 200 19.19% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 768-769. "Todas: Location: India (primarily Tamil Nadu state); Population: 1,042 (1988); Language: Toda; Religion: Centered on the sanctity of the buffalo "; "...very small community of Toda Christians. It numbers perhaps 200 persons who follow the Anglican rites of the Church of South India. "
Toda traditional religion India - Todas 1,000 100.00% - - 1600 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 768. "Historical records show that the Todas have never been a numerous group. European accounts estimate a population of no more than 100 people at the beginning of the 17th century, and a total that had dropped to 475 by 1952. "
Toda traditional religion India - Todas 842 80.81% - - 1988 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 768-769. "Todas: Location: India (primarily Tamil Nadu state); Population: 1,042 (1988); Language: Toda; Religion: Centered on the sanctity of the buffalo "; "Christian missionary efforts among the Todas at the turn of the century have resulted in the emergence of a very small community of Toda Christians. It numbers perhaps 200 persons who follow the Anglican rites of the Church of South India. "
Andamanese India: Andaman - - - - 1250 C.E. Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 83. "The 13th-century explorer Marcos Polo, for instance, recorded in accounts of his travels a story he heard of the 'dog-headed' inhabitants of the islands. More recently, in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Sign of Four, an Andaman Islander appears as a villain, complete with 'murderous darts' and a 'face [that] was enough to give a man a sleepless night.' "
Andamanese India: Andaman 5,000 - - - 1850 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 83. "The number of Andaman Islanders have dropped precipitously over the past two centuries, down from an estimated average of 5,000 islanders living throughout the archipelago in the middle of the 19th century. "
Andamanese India: Andaman 269 - - - 1983 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 35. "Andamanese: Alternate Names: Jarawas, Onge, Sentinelese; Location: India (Andaman Islands); Population: 269; Language: Andamanese; Religion: Animism "; "The Andamanese are the original inhabitants of the Andaman Islands... Of Negrito (Asian pygmy) stock, this population consists of hunting-and-gathering tribes... The total tribal population of the Andaman Islands was estimated to be 269 in 1983. "
Andamanese India: Andaman 500 - - - 1999 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 83. "Between 450 and 500 indigenous people still live on the islands, the last representatives of the dwindling population of Negrito people in south Asia. The Andaman Islanders followed the traditional way of life of these people--one of seminomadic hunter-gatherer-fishers--well into the 19th century, when Brisih colonists arrived and began to take over the islands. Despite intrusions, however, some islanders have managed to hold on to many of their traditional customs. "
Great Andamanese India: Andaman 625 - - - 1901 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "
Great Andamanese India: Andaman 625 - - - 1901 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 87. "In 1901, when the British undertook the first census in the Indian subcontinent, officials counted 624 Great Andamanese and estimated numbers for the other three tribes: 672 Onge, 468 Jarawa and 117 Sentinelese. "
Great Andamanese India: Andaman 23 - - - 1951 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "
Great Andamanese India: Andaman 23 - - - 1951 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 87. "By 1951, when independent India conducted its first census, the number of Great Andamanese had fallen to a mere 23. "
Great Andamanese India: Andaman 39 - - - 1998 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "
Great Andamanese India: Andaman 40 - - - 1998 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 87. "Today , of the nearly people who can claim Great Andamanese heritage, many have recent Indian ancestry as well... The ravages of the earliest and longest duration of contact have been borne by the Great Andamanese, who have been resettled on the small Strai Island; the Indian government arranged this as some measure of reparation for the ices that the people have undergone. "
Jarawa India: Andaman 468 - - - 1901 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "; estimate
Jarawa India: Andaman 468 - - - 1901 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 87. "In 1901, when the British undertook the first census in the Indian subcontinent, officials counted 624 Great Andamanese and estimated numbers for the other three tribes: 672 Onge, 468 Jarawa and 117 Sentinelese. "
Jarawa India: Andaman 50 - - - 1951 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "; estimate
Jarawa India: Andaman 50 - - - 1951 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 87. "By 1951, when independent India conducted its first census, the number of Great Andamanese had fallen to a mere 23. Estimates of the other tribes were also low--150 Onge, Jarawa and 50 Sentinelese. "
Jarawa India: Andaman 250 - - - 1998 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "; estimate
Jarawa India: Andaman 250 - - - 1998 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 87. "Only an estimated 100 Onge, 250 Jarawa and 100 Sentinelese are now alive. "
Om Sakathi India: Andaman - - 2
units
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site; web page: "Om Sakathi Organization " (viewed 26 Jan. 1999) Table "Numbers of Registered Mandrams "; "Data for the year 1997 "; "Each Mandram has between eight and several thousand members. "; [also called "Adhiparasakthi Movement "]; Note: "Andaman " is listed in table in the section for other countries outside India, yet as far as I know it is an Indian state.
Onge India: Andaman 672 - - - 1901 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "; estimate
Onge India: Andaman 672 - - - 1901 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 87. "In 1901, when the British undertook the first census in the Indian subcontinent, officials counted 624 Great Andamanese and estimated numbers for the other three tribes: 672 Onge, 468 Jarawa and 117 Sentinelese. "
Onge India: Andaman 150 - - - 1951 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "; estimate
Onge India: Andaman 150 - - - 1951 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 87. "By 1951, when independent India conducted its first census, the number of Great Andamanese had fallen to a mere 23. Estimates of the other tribes were also low--150 Onge, Jarawa and 50 Sentinelese. "
Onge India: Andaman 97 - - - 1981 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 35. "Andamanese: Alternate Names: Jarawas, Onge, Sentinelese; Location: India (Andaman Islands); Population: 269; Language: Andamanese; Religion: Animism "; "The Andamanese are the original inhabitants of the Andaman Islands... Of Negrito (Asian pgymy) stock, this population consists of hunting-and-gathering tribes... In the early years of the 20th century, 13 distinct indigenous tribes were present in the Andaman Islands. By the mid-1960s, however, only 4 groups remained [including] the Onge of Little Andaman Island... The 1981 census returned a population of 97 persons for the Onge. "
Onge India: Andaman 100 - - - 1998 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "; estimate
Onge India: Andaman 100 - - - 1998 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999), pg. 87. "Only an estimated 100 Onge, 250 Jarawa and 100 Sentinelese are now alive. "


India: Andaman, continued

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