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Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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India, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Moksha Foundation India - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Moksha Foundation official web site; web page: "What is Moksha?/Moksha Foundation " (viewed 22 July 1999). "Based in Lenox, Massachusetts, Moksha Foundation centers... also... in London, Boston, Amsterdam, Cologne [Germany], Sydney [Australia] and in Rishikesh, India. "
Mundas India 1,250,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 544-545. "Mundas: Location: India (Bihar state); Population: 1.25 million (estimate); Language: Mundari; Religion: Traditional animism; Hinduism; Christianity "; "The 1981 census reported 850,000 Mundas in Bihar State, where most of the Munda population is found. Allowing for natural increase, and the numbers of Mundas living in West Bengal, Assam, and in other northeastern states, the Munda population is estimated to be around 1.25 million today. " [NOTE: These statistics are of tribal/ethnic affiliation, NOT counts of how many practice traditional Munda religion.]
Murtipujaka Svetambaras India - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: Jainworld; web page: "History of various sects " (viewed 16 Jan. 1999) "The Murtipujaka Svetambaras are found scattered all over India for business purposes in large urban centers, still they are concentrated mostly in Gujarat. "
Must'ali Ismailis India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 114. "Bohoras... Muslim community in western India whose members, for the most part belong to the Isma'iliyya sect of Shi'ism and recognize al-Must'ali (1094-1101) as Imam and successor to his father al-Mustansir, the Fatmid, against the claims of his brother Nizar. Nizar's adherents are represented in India by the Khojas. The name implies the Hindu origin of the earliest converts to this sect. "
Naga India 500,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1939. "The mountainous border country between India and Burma is inhabited by a group of tribes known as the Nagas. They are of Mongoloid race and speak a variety of Tibeto-Burman languages. The total number of Nagas within the frontiers of India is about half a million, and although divided into a number of tribes, with different languages and customs, they are clearly distinguished from all surrounding populations. "; Pg. 1940: "In recent decades large numbers of Nagas have been converted to Christianity, and the practice of the old tribal religion is on the wane. "
Nagaland Baptist Church Council India 307,949 - 1,253
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Nastika India - - - - -500 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 525. "Nastika (Hindu - Sanskrit; lit. 'one who says, there is not'). A number of nihilstic schools of thought in ancient India. The nastikas opposed most of the doctrines of orthodox Hinduism, and were thus atheistic and existentialist in outlook. More generally, this term refers to all religious groups who deny the authority of the Vedas and, therefore, are deemed unorthodox; that is, 'non-Hindu.' "
National Council of Churches in India India 13,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* "Religion around the world: INDIAN CHRISTIANS RELIEVED AT HINDU COALITION'S DEMISE " in Deseret News, 24 April 1999. (Viewed online 26 April 1999.) [Orig. source: Ecumenical News International] "...K. Rajaratnam, president of the National Council of Churches in India, a forum of 29 Protestant and Orthodox churches with 13 million members. "
Nizari Ismailis India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 406. "Khojas. An Indian Muslim caste, converted from Hinduism in the fourteenth century by a Persian missionary of Isma'iliyya... there are at present three varieites of Khojas: 1) the majority, who are Nizari Ismailis and follow the Agha Khan; 2) Sunni Khojas; and 3) Imamite Khojas. Most Khojas are found in western India and east Africa. "
Nonreligious & Atheist India - 2.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page: "The 'Right' India Strategy? " by Justin D. Long, 1998 (viewed 5 March 1999) "While China is more than half nonreligious/atheist, India is only about 2% nonreligious/athiest. "
North Bank Baptist Christian Association India 50,567 - 699
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Nyaya-Vaisesika India - - - - 150 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 543. "Nyaya-Vaisesika. A Hindu philosophical system which adopts the standpoint of realism in epistemology and pluralism in metaphysics, originating in two distinct works, the Vaisesikasutras of Kanada (ca. A.D. 100?) and the Nyayasutras of Gautama (A.D. 150?). Philosophers of these separate texts realized early that their schools were complementary... Differences between the two are minimal after the seventh century, and their identity is explicityly recognized after the time of Udayana (eleventh century). The development of the system as Navya-Nyaya by Ganesa (fourteenth century) and his commentators represents... Nyaya-Vaisesika's importance should not be underestimated. Controversy between it and the rival Buddhist school of logicians headed by Dignaga and Dharmakirti dominated philosophizing in the middle of the first millennium A.D., and the influence of Navya-Nyaya one thousand years later is overshadowed only by that of the Vedanta school of Advaita. "
Om Sakathi India - - 1,882
units
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site; web page: "Om Sakathi Organization " (viewed 26 Jan. 1999) Table "Numbers of Registered Mandrams "; "Data for the year 1997 "; "Each Mandram has between eight and several thousand members. "; [also called "Adhiparasakthi Movement "]; 1882 is the total of 1,779 Mandrams inside Tamil Nadu, 2 in Andaman, and 101 elsewhere in India.
Orthodox Church of the East India - - 1
unit
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991), pg. 143-144. Section: Non-Chalcedonian Orthodoxy. "Orthodox Church of the East... Vashon, WA [H.Q.]... Membership:...There is one congregation each in India and Pakistan. "
other India 2,200,000 0.40% - - 1971 *LINK* web site: Invest India; web page: Religions of India (viewed 16 Jan. 1999) "The 1971 census produced the following statistics: 453 million Hindu; 61 million Muslim; 14 million Christian; 10 million Sikh; 3.8 million Buddhist; 2.6 million Jain; 2.2 million Parsis, Jews and others "
other India 4,000,000 0.50% - - 1991 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 179. Table: "breakdown of major religions in India, according to the population totals of the 1991 census, is roughly as follows " [ "Other " here is groups NOT included in: Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, Sikhism, Buddhism & Jainism.]
other India 29,000,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; "other " = NOT Hinduism, Sunni, Shiite, Sikhism, Roman Catholic, Protestant, Buddhism, Jainism, Zoroastrianism
Parsis India - - - - 1300 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2137. "...Parsees consider themselves to be descendants of small groups of people who emigrated from Persia in the 8th century AD in order to avoid forceful conversion to Islam, and to retain Zorastrianism... details of their escape from Persia and perilous sea voyage to India are largely legendary. It is believed that they landed on the island of Diu off the south coast of Kathiawar, and that from there they sailed to Gujarat and obtained... permission to settle at a place near Sanjan on the Gujarat coast... From Sanjan, Parsees spread subsequently as settlers and merchants both northwards to places such as Navsari and southwards to the region of the present Bombay. Wherever they settled they established fire temples and by about 1300 AD there were Parsee colonies in various parts of western India. I the early 14th century Moslem invaders defeated the Hindu overlords of the Parsee of Sanjan, and the later had to flee once more. After various vicissitudes they settled at Bansda. "
Parsis India 89,887 - - - 1891 Boyce, Mary. "Zoroastrianism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 174. "Figure 4.2: Some Parsi statistics "
Parsis India 94,190 - - - 1901 Boyce, Mary. "Zoroastrianism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 174. "Figure 4.2: Some Parsi statistics "
Parsis India 100,096 - - - 1911 Boyce, Mary. "Zoroastrianism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 174. "Figure 4.2: Some Parsi statistics "
Parsis India 101,778 - - - 1921 Boyce, Mary. "Zoroastrianism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 174. "Figure 4.2: Some Parsi statistics "
Parsis India 109,752 - - - 1931 Boyce, Mary. "Zoroastrianism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 174. "Figure 4.2: Some Parsi statistics "
Parsis India 114,890 - - - 1941 Boyce, Mary. "Zoroastrianism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 174. "Figure 4.2: Some Parsi statistics "
Parsis India 111,791 - - - 1951 Boyce, Mary. "Zoroastrianism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 174. "Figure 4.2: Some Parsi statistics "
Parsis India 100,772 - - - 1961 Boyce, Mary. "Zoroastrianism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 174. "Figure 4.2: Some Parsi statistics "
Parsis India 100,072 - - - 1961 *LINK* Brown, Derek. "Unique people on road to extinction " in The Guardian, posted in: jain-list (newgroup), page: "Parsis: The Fastest Shrinking Religion " (viewed 30 Jan. 1999); "To: jain-list@ddb.com; From: "Y. Malaiya " ; Date: Wed, 16 Apr 1997 19:20:45 -0600; CC: malaiya@CS.ColoState.EDU; Organization: Colorado State Uni; Sender: malaiya@CS.ColoState.EDU " "In 1961, after more than 1,200 years in India, Parsees contributed 100,072 names to the national census. In 1971, there were 91,226; in 1981, 71,630. Religious definitions were dropped in last year's census, but the latest estimate of the Parsee population is just 58,000. "
Parsis India 140,000 - - - 1967 *LINK* Dinshah, Jay (a son of Dinshah P. Ghadiali, President of The American Vegan Society). Song of India; Excerpt posted in: jain-list (newgroup, permanent page, viewed 30 Jan. 1999); "To: jain-list@ddb.com; Subject: Re: Parsis: The Fastest Shrinking Religion; From: ahimsa.vegan@mail.utexas.edu (Gabriel E. Figueroa); Date: Thu, 17 Apr 1997 01:31:39 -0500 (CDT) " "There are some 140,000 Zoroastrians today (1967), mostly around Bombay... "
Parsis India 100,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2137. "Concentrated mainly in several towns of western India, where they number about 100,000, and Pakistan, where they total about 5,000, Parsees... "
Parsis India 91,266 - - - 1971 Boyce, Mary. "Zoroastrianism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984], pg. 174. "Figure 4.2: Some Parsi statistics "
Parsis India 91,226 - - - 1971 *LINK* Brown, Derek. "Unique people on road to extinction " in The Guardian, posted in: jain-list (newgroup), page: "Parsis: The Fastest Shrinking Religion " (viewed 30 Jan. 1999); "To: jain-list@ddb.com; From: "Y. Malaiya " ; Date: Wed, 16 Apr 1997 19:20:45 -0600; CC: malaiya@CS.ColoState.EDU; Organization: Colorado State Uni; Sender: malaiya@CS.ColoState.EDU " "In 1961, after more than 1,200 years in India, Parsees contributed 100,072 names to the national census. In 1971, there were 91,226; in 1981, 71,630. Religious definitions were dropped in last year's census, but the latest estimate of the Parsee population is just 58,000. "
Parsis India 120,000 - - - 1978 Rice, Edward. Ten Religions of the East. New York: Four Winds Press (1978), pg. 41. "When the British made Bombay the center of trade, the Parsees followed. Today they are a small but prosperous community of some 120,000 people... "
Parsis India 71,630 - - - 1981 *LINK* Brown, Derek. "Unique people on road to extinction " in The Guardian, posted in: jain-list (newgroup), page: "Parsis: The Fastest Shrinking Religion " (viewed 30 Jan. 1999); "To: jain-list@ddb.com; From: "Y. Malaiya " ; Date: Wed, 16 Apr 1997 19:20:45 -0600; CC: malaiya@CS.ColoState.EDU; Organization: Colorado State Uni; Sender: malaiya@CS.ColoState.EDU " "In 1961, after more than 1,200 years in India, Parsees contributed 100,072 names to the national census. In 1971, there were 91,226; in 1981, 71,630. Religious definitions were dropped in last year's census, but the latest estimate of the Parsee population is just 58,000. "
Parsis India 100,000 - - - 1983 Berger, Gilda. Religion: A Reference First Book. New York: Franklin Watts (1983), pg. 96. "Only aboput 11,000 adherents of Zoroastrianism remain in Iran today. The Parsis (or Parsees) of India, who number around 100,000, are members of a Zoroastrian sect. "
Parsis India 58,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Brown, Derek. "Unique people on road to extinction " in The Guardian, posted in: jain-list (newgroup), page: "Parsis: The Fastest Shrinking Religion " (viewed 30 Jan. 1999); "To: jain-list@ddb.com; From: "Y. Malaiya " ; Date: Wed, 16 Apr 1997 19:20:45 -0600; CC: malaiya@CS.ColoState.EDU; Organization: Colorado State Uni; Sender: malaiya@CS.ColoState.EDU " "In 1961, after more than 1,200 years in India, Parsees contributed 100,072 names to the national census. In 1971, there were 91,226; in 1981, 71,630. Religious definitions were dropped in last year's census, but the latest estimate of the Parsee population is just 58,000. "
Pentecostal India 190,000 - - - 1976 Quebedeaux, Richard. The New Charismatics: The Origins, Development, and Significance of Neo-Pentecostalism; Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1976), pg. 46-47. "thanks to Prudencio Damboriena and Walter Hollenweger's work, we can offer a very approximate estimate of total [Classical] Pentecostal adherents in nations where the movement has had a measurable impact... "
Plymouth Brethren India - - 1,500
units
- 1998 *LINK* web page: "'Plymouth Brethren' FAQ "; "Author: Shawn Abigail; November1998; Version 1.6.1 " India: Kerala-has more than 400 assemblies. Andhra Pradesh also there will be not less than 500 Assembleies. Tamil Nadu may have around 400 assemblies while Karnataka may have 200 assemblies.
Poona and Indian Village Mission India - - - - 1893 *LINK* web site: "Christian Missions "; web page: "SIM History " (viewed 6 July 1999). "...in 1893, Charles Reeves and M.E. Gavin left their homes in Australia. A Eurasian Christian from Poona, India, had come to Australia in search of missionaries to work in his home area. Reeves and Gavin answered the challenge and set sail under the name Poona and Indian Village Mission (PIVM). "
Presbyterian Church of India India 823,456 0.09% 2,568
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "India (PCI)/Presbyterian Church of India (PCI) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Presbyterian Church of India (PCI)... Country information: PCI is situated in North East India, formerly known as Assam, which is to the north and east of Bangladesh, bounded on the north and north east by Bhutan and Tibet, and on the south and south east by Myanmar. It is connected to the rest of India by a very narrow strip of land between Bangladesh and Bhutan... Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 919 million... Church information... Members/Congregations: 823,456/2,568. "
primal-indigenous India 9,774,611 3.09% - - 1921 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 368. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.] Listed in table as "Tribal "
primal-indigenous India 8,280,347 2.36% - - 1931 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 368. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.] Listed in table as "Tribal "
primal-indigenous India - - - - 1972 Raman, T. A. India; Grand Rapids, Michigan: Fideler Company (1972), pg. 47-48. "In the remote hills and jungles of India there are several million people who belong to primitive tribes. The men shown in the picture at the right are Naga tribesmen from the Indian state of Assam. Many of these tribes live in much the same way as the American Indians did before the white men came. However, some of the people are gradually settling in farm villages. "
primal-indigenous India 40,000,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions. Though some of the least developed Indian tribes have been reduced to fewer than a thousand members, the total strength of the tribal population in India is close to 40 million. The conventional grouping of the tribes is based on linguistic criteria. Speakers of Dravidian languages are found mainly in South India and include primitive hunters and food gatherers such as Chenchus and Kadars, as well as relatively advanced farming peoples such as Gonds and Oraons. Tribes speaking Munda languages and extending over parts of Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, and Orissa include the Santal, Ho, Gadaba, Bondo, and Saora. Very different from all of these tribe of peninsular India are the Tibeto-Burmean tribes of Northeast India, whoe inhabit such hill regions as Nagaland as well as the territory bordering Tibet... No tribal society in South Asia is without a belief in supernatural beings... "
primal-indigenous India - 1.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 904,800,000; listed in table as "animism "
Protestant India 2,406,302 - - - 1938 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 367. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "The Statistical Survey of the World Mission (International Missionary Council, N.Y. 1938) reveals a total of 1,042,416 communicants and 1,363,886 baptized non-communicants or a total of 2,406,302 baptized Protestant Christians... "
Protestant India 9,000,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Protestant India - 2.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 904,800,000
Radha Soami Foundation, Beas India - - - - 1890 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 319. "The novelty of Radha Soami came in the establishment of an industrial city at Dayalbagh, near Agra, and the creation of an international center by a branch of the movement at Beas, in the Indian state of Punjab. The movement first attracted Western followers in the late nineteenth century from among British officers stationed in India. "
Radha Soami Foundation, Beas India 2,000,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 596. "In 1891 Jaimal Singh (1839-1933) started a Radha Soami center at Beas, about twenty miles from Amritsar. He was succeeded by Sawan Singh (d. 1948) and Jagat Singh (d. 1951). The present head of the Beas Radha Soami is Charan Singh, grandson of Sawan Singh. A sizable township named Dera Baba Jaimal Singh has become the residence of the Guru and headquarters of the movement, which claims a following of over two million, including Hindus, Muslims, Christians, Parsis, and Sikhs. "
Radhasoami Satsang India - - - - 1915 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 596. "Radha Soami Satsang. A sect containing elements of Hinduism and Sikhism; founded by a Hindu banker, Shiv Dayal of Agra (1818-78)... On his death his followers split. One branch remained at Agra under Rai Saligram Bahadur (1828-98), then under Brahma Sankar Misra (1861-1907) moved to Allahabad, and finally to Banaras. The Agra branch under Sri Anand Swarup, who became its head in 1915, set up an industrial estate in the suburb of Dayalbagh, where they also erected a large marble temple. "
Rama worship India - - - - 40 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 781. "Of the fourteen avatars recognized by most texts and traditions, Rama and Krishna are the two major deities of Vaisnavism, usually but not always exclusive of one another... The Rama sect. Their primary text is the Epic Ramayana, first composed in Sanskrit by Valmiki sometime around the beginning of the Christian era. "
Rama worship India - - - - 1100 C.E. *LINK* Tamminen, Tapio. "Hindu Revivalism and the Hindutva Movement " in Temenos 32 (1996), 221-238. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999). "The Rama cult originates from the fifth and sixth centuries AD. According to Hans Bakker, the myth of Vishnu's incarnation as Rama became popular in the Gupta age. But the cult in which Rama was worshipped as the supreme form and main manifestation of Vishnu did not rise until the eleventh and twelfth centuries. It began to emerge in the latest period of independent Hindu rule in North India and before Muslim power was firmly established (Bakker 1986: 63, 66; Srivastava 1991: 39). "
Rama worship India - - - - 1450 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 54-55. "Prominent Vaishnavites included... Ramananda (early 15th century), who began the cult of Rama worship, which over the years spawned two movements. "
Ramakrishna Order India - - 100
units
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972), pg. 135. "There are 150 [Ramakrishna Math ( "Monastary ") and Mission] centers, about fifty outside India. The Mission operates in India a dozen modern hospitals and sixty clinics, 8 colleges, and 35 high schools, and more than 100 lower schools. "
Ramakrishna Order India - - 200
units
- 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 286. "Ramakrishna Order... The main seat of the order is the Belur Math, on the Ganges near Calcutta. In addition, 200 monasteries are scattered throughout India. "
Ramakrishna Order India - - 97
units
- 1991 *LINK* "Global Dharma " in Hinduism Today International (Apr. 1994) It had grown by the 1990's to include 130 branches in 13 countries, including 97 in India. Here is a summary from their 1991 General Report for the year 1990-1991. [Termed "Ramakrishna Mission "]
Ramakrishna Order India - - 100
units
- 1994 *LINK* "Nation Building and Man Making Make Up Vivekananda Kendra's Mission " in Hinduism Today International (June 1994) Vivekananda Kendra, which started out as an idea 20 years ago, today has 100 branch centers throughout India. [Termed "Ramakrishna Mission "]
Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh India 22,500,000 - 300,000
units
- 1996 *LINK* Tamminen, Tapio. "Hindu Revivalism and the Hindutva Movement " in Temenos 32 (1996), 221-238. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999). "RSS (Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh)... Each branch of the RSS ('Hindu home troops') organization acts in the same way throughout India... In the RSS organization the basic units are called 'shakhas' (branches). The membership of each shakha varies between 50 and 100 male participants. Nowadays it is estimated that there are around 300,000 shakhas all over the country. " [75 * 300,000 = 22,500,000]
Reform Judaism India - - 1
unit
- 1925 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 202. "...the Jewish Religious Union, which has been India's only Reform temple since it was founded in 1925. But even there, membership depends less on theology than on education and class... "
Reform Judaism India - - 1
unit
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 202. "...the Jewish Religious Union, which has been India's only Reform temple since it was founded in 1925. But even there, membership depends less on theology than on education and class. The Jewish Religious Union is patronized exclusively by the Bene Israel elite: doctors, lawyers, and other well-educated members of the community. "
religious India - - - - 1999 Gallagher, Winifred. Working on God. New York: Random House (1999), pg. 16. "As the millennium approaches, the experiential, individualistic thread remarked so long ago by Emerson runs brightly through America's religious fabric. Among nations, only India is demonstrably more spiritual. Ninety-five percent of Americans say they believe in God. "
Samavesam of Telugu Baptist Churches India 475,639 - 893
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Santal religion India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Tribes speaking Munda languages and extending over parts of Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, and Orissa include the Santal, Ho, Gadaba, Bondo, and Saora. "
Saora India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Tribes speaking Munda languages and extending over parts of Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, and Orissa include the Santal, Ho, Gadaba, Bondo, and Saora. "
Sarvastivada Buddhism India - - - - -250 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 151. "During Asoka's council (around 250 B.C.) the Sthaviras spawned the Sarvastivadins and the Vibhajyavadins. The Sarvastivadins migrated to northwest India, becoming sophisticated scholastics, known for their theory that 'everything exists' and for their careful analysis of Buddhist philosophy. "
Sathya Sai Baba India 3,000,000 - - - 1994 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 195. "...he has a purported following in India of two to three million. Currently Satya Sai Baba maintains three major centers in the United States (Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Phoenix). "
Sautrantika Buddhism India - - - - 150 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 309. "Sautrantika - Skt.; Hinayana school that developed out of the Sarvastivada around 150 C.E. As its name indicated, the followers of this school draw their support only from the Sutra-pitaka... "
Scientology India - - 2
units
- 1999 *LINK* web page (OPPOSING VIEW): "Scientology Worldwide " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999); "Last Update on 10th Feb. 1999 " Number here ( "# congregations ") represent total of all orgs: Dianetic Centers, Celebrity Centers, missions, etc.; "CoS web sites have lists of Missions (1998) & Orgs (1996) from which the Table below is derived. Original concept and research by 'Inducto'. "
Shaiva-Siddhanta India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 641. "Saiva Siddhanta (Sanskrit.; lit. 'the Tenets of the Devotees of Shiva). An influential medieval school of Hinduism, concentrated primarily in south India (especially in Medras State) and represented primarily through the medium of Tamil language and literature. This is one of the four Saiva sects which follow either the Vedas or the Sanskrit and Tamil Agamas ('traditional' texts) or both. "
Shaiva-Siddhanta India - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 312. "Shaiva-Siddhanta, Skt., lit. 'the highest goal of the Shaivas'; name given to the South Indian movement Shaivism, which resembles the Vishishtadvaita-Vedanta (qualified nondualism) of Ramanuja... "
Shaiva-Siddhanta India - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 312. "Shaivism, or Shivaism; one of the three major devotional movements in modern-day Hinduism. The other two are Vaishnavism and Shaktism. Shaivas view Shiva as the supreme being... Shaivism in South India is called Shaiva-Siddhanta; Shaivism in Kashmir is called Pratyabhijna. "
Shaivism India - - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973), pg. 165. "Shaivas or Saivas, members of that branch of Hinduism which looks on the god Shiva as ultimate... They are divided into several sects, and their temples are found all over India, but they are strongest in the peninsula, especially in Madras State and Kashmir. "
Shaivism India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 642. "Saivism... The English designation for a number of distinct but related communities in India who worship Shiva (Siva) in his many forms as the chief among the gods or as a Supreme Deity. Since the word refers to a loosely allied network of cults and not to a single religious community, there is no equivalent term in any Indian language. Saivism is predominant in south India, particularly in Madras State. "
Shaivism India - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 312. "Shaivism, or Shivaism; one of the three major devotional movements in modern-day Hinduism. The other two are Vaishnavism and Shaktism. Shaivas view Shiva as the supreme being...Shaivism in South India is called Shaiva-Siddhanta; Shaivism in Kashmir is called Pratyabhijna. "
Shaivism India - - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987), pg. 194. "Shaivism is a more coherent entity than Vaishnavism, but there are several different schools with their own teachings, in particular the monistic school of Kashmir Shaivism and the south Indian school of Shaiva Siddhanta... Another separate group is represented by the Virashaivas or Lingayats ('lingam-bearers') of Karnataka, founded in the twelfth century CE. "


India, continued

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