Adherents.com Home Page

Adherents.com - Religion by Location


Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

To Index

back to India, Catholic

India, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Catholic India 14,000,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Catholic India - 1.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 904,800,000
Catholic - seminarians, major India 9,828 - - - 1997 *LINK* Zenit. "DOSSIER: BRAZIL AND MEXICO HAVE LARGEST NUMBER OF CATHOLICS " on "Zenit News Agency " web site (online Catholic news); Archives: 13 June 1999 (ZE99061302). (Viewed 19 June 1999). "...figures given in the latest edition of the Church's Statistical Yearbook for 1997... India is the country with the largest number of major seminarians (9,828), followed by the Philippines (7,618). However, the country with the greatest number of ordinations to the priesthood is Poland, with 580 in 1997. "
Chakmas India 230,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 150-151. "The Chakma population today is estimated to be around 550,000 people, but it is spread over 3 different countries... population spills over [from Bangladesh] into neighboring areas of southwest Mizoram State in India, where another 80,000 Chakmas live, & Burma (Myanmar) which has 20,000 Chakmas. In addition, Tripura State in India has some 50,000 Chakma refugees who fled Bangladeshi Army operations... in 1988. Another group of Chakmas, now numbering around 100,000 people, is found in the foothills of the Himalayas in northeastern India. " [NOTE: This is a tribal/ethnic group, not a distinct religion.]
Chamars India 45,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 159-160. "Chamars: Alternate Names: Untouchables; Scheduled Caste; Location: Northern India (mainly Uttar Pradesh state); Population: About 45 million; Religion: Hinduism; traditional animism, nature-worship, an superstition "; "Chamars form one of the major occupational castes of India... In general, Chamars are Hindus... Given their low status in traditional Hindu society, it is not surprising that Chamars have been attracted to religions that downplay or reject notions of untouchability... Many are followers of devotional (bhakti) Hindu sects such as Kabir Panth... [others have accepted Sikhism, Christianity, and Islam...] More recently, some groups such as the Jadavs in Uttar Pradesh have converted to Buddhism... " [NOTE: Chamars is a cultural/ethnic group, NOT a distinct religion.]
Chin India 800,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 163-164. "In India, another 400,000 live in Mizoram state, about 200,000 live in Manipur state, and some 200,000 are scattered throughout other parts of India. " [NOTE: This statistic is of cultural/ethnic affiliation, NOT a count of current practitioners of traditional Chin religion, as almost all Chin today are Christian.]
Christianity India 2,923,240 0.99% - - 1901 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 367. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "According to the Indian Census the reported Christian pop., Protestant & Catholic in India in 1901 was 2,923,240; in 1911, 3,876,203; in 1921, 4,754,064 and in 1931, 6,297,000. The percentage... was .99; 1.24; 1.51; & 1.79. "
Christianity India 3,876,203 1.24% - - 1911 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 367. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "According to the Indian Census the reported Christian pop., Protestant & Catholic in India in 1901 was 2,923,240; in 1911, 3,876,203; in 1921, 4,754,064 and in 1931, 6,297,000. The percentage... was .99; 1.24; 1.51; & 1.79. "
Christianity India 4,754,064 1.51% - - 1921 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 367. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "According to the Indian Census the reported Christian pop., Protestant & Catholic in India in 1901 was 2,923,240; in 1911, 3,876,203; in 1921, 4,754,064 and in 1931, 6,297,000. The percentage... was .99; 1.24; 1.51; & 1.79. "
Christianity India 4,754,064 1.51% - - 1921 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 368. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.]
Christianity India 6,297,000 1.79% - - 1931 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 367. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "According to the Indian Census the reported Christian pop., Protestant & Catholic in India in 1901 was 2,923,240; in 1911, 3,876,203; in 1921, 4,754,064 and in 1931, 6,297,000. The percentage... was .99; 1.24; 1.51; & 1.79. "
Christianity India 6,296,763 1.79% - - 1931 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 368. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.]
Christianity India 6,000,000 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 367. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "The entire Christian community of India numbers over 6,000,000, of which probably ninety per cent have come from the depressed classes. "
Christianity India - 2.00% - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957), pg. 11. "Christianity reached India at least 1,600, perhaps even 1,900 years ago, and during three centuries of British, French and Portuguese occupation, conditions favored Christian evangelism, yet Christians constitute only 2% of India's population today. "
Christianity India 10,000,000 2.50% - - 1961 Nakamura, Hajime. Ways of Thinking of Eastern Peoples: India - China - Tibet - Japan. Honolulu, Hawaii: East-West Center Press (1964; revised English translation edited by Philip P. Wiener), pg. 163. "More than 400 years have passed since the Christians began their missionary work in this country, and at present (Census of 1961) there are about nine or ten million Christian adherents in India--less than one-fortieth of the whole population. Besides, as the national censuses and the reports of the Christian missions indicate, many of the converts to Christianity live in South India and consist chiefly of those expelled from the Hindu community--the Sudras, the vagabonds, and the uncivilized people of the mountains. "
Christianity India 14,000,000 2.56% - - 1971 *LINK* web site: Invest India; web page: Religions of India (viewed 16 Jan. 1999) "The 1971 census produced the following statistics: 453 million Hindu; 61 million Muslim; 14 million Christian; 10 million Sikh; 3.8 million Buddhist; 2.6 million Jain; 2.2 million Parsis, Jews and others "
Christianity India 15,000,000 2.52% - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 359. "Christianity has established itself principally in the coastal regions of South India since its introduction in the second century A.D. and claims 15 million members. "
Christianity India - 2.50% - - 1983 Oxtoby, Willard G. The Meaning of Other Faiths. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press (1983), pg. 86. "Moreover, as the overwhelming majority of Indians, Hindus see little pressure to relate corporately to the 2.5% of their society that is Christian. "
Christianity India 20,000,000 2.40% - - 1991 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 179. Table: "breakdown of major religions in India, according to the population totals of the 1991 census, is roughly as follows "
Christianity India 18,380,000 2.00% - - 1994 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "India (CNI)/Church of North India (CNI) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 919 million... Main religions: Hinduism (82%), Islam (11%), Christianity (2%), Sikhism (2%)? "
Christianity India 25,000,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* "News in Brief " in Hinduism Today International (Jan. 1996 -- Vol. 18, No. 1); original source: ENI Bulletin. "Up to 80 percent of India's 25-million Christians are Dalit, " reports ENI Bulletin.
Christianity India 23,202,796 2.40% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Hindu 80%, Muslim 14%, Christian 2.4%, Sikh 2%, Buddhist 0.7%, Jains 0.5%, other 0.4%; Total Population: 966,783,171.
Christianity India - 3.00% - - 1997 *LINK* DAWN FridayFax 1997 #49 According to government figures, only some 3% of the population are Christians. Insiders estimate the number much higher, partly due to the flood of so-called 'secret Christians' who are not baptised because of massive social disadvantages
Christianity India 19,000,000 2.00% - - 1997 Russell, Malcom B. The Middle East and South Asia 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997), pg. 77. Estimates of % of population in principal religions, & est. 1997 total pop.
Christianity India 22,560,000 2.40% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 287. "Location: India; Population: About 940 million; Religion: Hinduism (80%); Islam (14%); Christianity (2.4%); Sikhism (2%); Buddhism (0.7%); Jainism (0.5%)... "
Christianity India - 6.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page: "The 'Right' India Strategy? " by Justin D. Long, 1998 (viewed 5 March 1999) "About three-quarters of India's population are Hindus, 10% Muslim, and 6% Christian. "
Christianity India - 2.50% - - 1999 *LINK* "Asia " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Only 2.5 percent of India's population is Christian. "
Christianity India - 3.00% - - 1999 *LINK* AP. "Indian government failing to protect Christians, group says " in Deseret News, 2 Oct. 1999 (v. online 3 Oct. 99). "...Christians, who represent less than 3 percent of the nation's population. "
Christianity India 23,000,000 2.30% - - 1999 AP. "Pope urged to address 'forced conversions' in India " in Deseret News, 17 Oct. 1999 (v. online). "Christians comprise about 2.3 percent of India's nearly one billion people. "
Christianity India 20,000,000 2.00% - - 2000 *LINK* AP. "India Christians urged to form a national church " in Deseret News (21 Oct 2000) "A Hindu nationalist group that is the ideological fountainhead of the ruling party urged Christians to form a national Indian church and break with foreign missionaries it accused of wrecking national unity, Indian newspapers report. The group, the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) or National Volunteers Corps, is often accused of targeting Christians and Muslims. RSS leader Kuppahali Seetaramaiyah Sudarshan said, 'Why are these foreign churches allowed to carry on their activities on our soil?' he was quoted as saying. He urged the setting up of an Indian denomination along lines of the Orthodox Syrian Church. India, a nation of 1 billion people, is overwhelmingly Hindu. Muslims form 12 percent of the population and Christians just over 2 percent. "
Christianity - missionaries India 114,500 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page: "The 'Right' India Strategy? " by Justin D. Long, 1998 (viewed 5 March 1999) "Additionally, a strategy for India must take into account the enormous amount of evangelistic energy already being invested. There are an estimated 114,500 Indian evangelists sent by Indian-founded missions. Many of these are at work in the heavily-evangelized south, but not a few are found in the less-evangelized north. "
Church of God in Christ, Mennonite India 64 - - - 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Asia/Pacific: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " INDIA... Church of God in Christ, Mennonite... Members: 64
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints India 1,800 - 20
units
- 1995 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1996), pg. 188-408. "Year-end 1995: Est. population [of country]; Members, [number shown in '# of adherents' column to left] "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints India 2,000 - 18
units
- 1997 Deseret News 1999-2000 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1998), pg. 267-410. Information from a variety of sources. Figures for year-end 1997.
Church of North India India 1,125,000 0.12% 3,000
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "India (CNI)/Church of North India (CNI) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Church of North India (CNI)... Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 919 million... Church information... Members/Congregations: 1,125,000/3,000 served through 24 dioceses. "
Church of South India India - - - - 1947 Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970), pg. 544. "In 1947 the Church of South India was inaugurated. Five Anglican bishops were re-elected, and nine new bishops elected and consecrated. A million Indian Christians were brought together into one independent, indigenous communion. "
Church of South India India 2,800,000 0.30% 10,200
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "India (CSI)/Church of South India (CSI) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Church of South India (CSI)?Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 919 million?Church information?Members/Congregations: 2.8 million/10,200. "
Church of the Nazarene India 54,061 - 603
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site: Nazarene World Mission Society Church Statistics: Churches; 8 Jan. 1998; total population: 904,800,000
Conference of the Mennonite Brethren Church in India India 65,350 - - - 1994 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Asia/Pacific: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " INDIA... Conference of the Mennonite Brethren Church in India... Members (1994): 65,250
Convention of Baptist Church of the Northern Circar India 165,400 - 255
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "; [Conv. Of Bapt. Ch. Of the Northern Circar]
Convention of Baptist Churches of Maharastra India 3,230 - 35
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Council for World Mission India 4,748,456 - 15,768
units
- 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Churches " (viewed 31 May 1999). Added up memberships of constituent member bodies in India: Church of North India, Church of South India, and Presbyterian Church of India. "
Council of Baptist Churches in Northern India India 70,000 - 470
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Dadupanthis India - - - - 1603 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "DADUPANTHIS: HINDU REVITALIZATION MOVEMENT which rejected or reformulated many TRADITIONAL Hindu BELIEFS. REBIRTH as an animal was considered impossible and reinterpreted as symbolic of the mood of the individual. BHAKTI played an important role in this movement which was founded by a LAY-MAN, Dd (1544-1603). His followers included PRIESTS and the movement shared many of the characteristics of SIKHISM. "
Dakshinamargis India - - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957), pg. 24. "Besides the major Hindu sects of Vishnu and Shiva, there are many minor ones. The strongest, in numbers and influence, is... of Shakti whose followers worship 'God in the aspect of mother.'... divided into two main groups, the Dakshinamargis, or followers of the right-hand way, and Vamamargis, or left-handed worshipers. The first take the usual path of renunciation of the world, the second the unusual path toward enjoyment of life. The Dakshinamargis do openly what they profess, the Vamamargis keep their rituals secret. "
Dakshinamargis India - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 53-54. "In Shaktism or Tantrism... Some of these texts relate esoteric practices divided into Vamachara, or left-handed path, and Dakshinachara, or right-handed path... "
Daudi Bohras India - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992), pg. 223. "Tayyibi Ismailis (the Bohras): Arising out of the disputed Assassins succession in the 12th century, the believe in the concealment of the two year-old al-Tayyib, and that there has been no revealed Imam since 1130. They give authority to the chief missionary, the Dai a-Dua. After persecution in Yemen his seat was moved to Bombay. Following a disputed succession the group divided between the Daudi Bohras who live mainly in India, and the Sulaymani Bohras who live in Najran in Saudi Arabia. "
Dialouge Centre India 1 - - - 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "In India one person 'was' the Dialogue Centre for several years, and in Ireland this was also more or less the case. "
Digambaras India - - - - 1000 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 370. "In the centuries after the Svetambara-Digambara division, the Svetambaras were predominant in th West and Northwest (modern-day Maharashtra, Gujarat, and Rajasthan), while the Digambaras dominated the movement in Central and Southern India. "
Digambaras India - - - - 1978 Rice, Edward. Ten Religions of the East. New York: Four Winds Press (1978), pg. 16. "Since [A.D. 475] the Svetambaras, who are the larger [Jain] group, have been strongest in Gujarat and Rajasthan, in northewest India, while the Digambaras, now declining, are concentrated in the Deccan, a long mountainous plateau along the southwest coast, and in the old princely state of Mysore. "
Digambaras India - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 91. "Digambara: 1. 'clothed in air,' i.e., naked. In Hinduism, the fat that a sadhu goes about naked means that he is no longer bound to his sexual identity; 2. the name of one of the two major sects of Jainism. "
Digambaras India - - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987), pg. 211. "The Digambaras are now found mainly in the Deccan and Mysore, and comprise several communities or sanghas. "
Digambaras - monastic India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 223. "Digambara. One of the two major monastic traditions in Jainism. The name refers to the requirement that monks renounce all possessions, including all clothing, and live completely naked, i.e. 'dressed [only] in the four directions [of the compass].' "
Digambaras - monastic India 175 - - - 1984 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987), pg. 208. "According to a survey, in 1984 there were about 5,620 Jaina ascetics -- monks and nuns -- the majority belonging to the Scvetambara sect (1,200 monks and 3,400 nuns), followed by the Sthanakavasis (325 monks and 520 nuns), and then the Digambaras (65 monks, 60 'lay brothers' and 50 'lay sisters'). "
Divine Life Society India - - 164
units
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972), pg. 176. "137 affiliated branches [of the Divine Life Society] have been established in India and 27 overseas. The overses branches also have satellite branches in smaller cities. To disseminate the teachings of Swami Sivananda and Swami Chidananda... "
Divine Life Society India - - 137
units
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972), pg. 176. "137 affiliated branches [of the Divine Life Society] have been established in India and 27 overseas. The overses branches also have satellite branches in smaller cities. To disseminate the teachings of Swami Sivananda and Swami Chidananda... "
Divine Life Society India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 319-320. "Swami Vishnu-Devananda... set up... True World Order; it is based on a similar large movement, the Divine Life Society, established by his famous teacher Swami Sivananda in the India holy city of Rishikesh. "
Divine Light Mission India 6,000,000 - - - 1973 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980), pg. 63. [followers of Guru Maharaj Ji] "The movement boasted 480 centers in thirty-eight countries around the world and had an estimated 6 million followers in India alone. "
Divine Light Mission India 5,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: WORLD CHRISTIAN ENCYCLOPEDIA -- edited by David B. Barrett); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) The Divine Light Mission claims 5 million followers in India including many former nominal Indian Christians and also European and American youth
Dravidian India - - - - -1500 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 229. "Dravidian. A family of languages spoken throughout Southern India, the main modern representations of which are Tamil, Kannada, Telugu, and Malayalam. By extension, the term also refers to the peoples speaking these languages. Before the Aryan invasion of India around 1500 B.C., the homeland of the proto-Dravidians included Northwest India, and it appears probably that the Indus Valley civilization is attributable to them. "
Evangelical Church of India India 250,000 - 680
units
- 1998 *LINK* web site: "The Evangelical Church of India "; web page: "The Missiological Factors Behind the ECI Church Growthgrowth " (viewed 1 March 1999) And ECI now has over 680 churches with a quarter of a million community
FACE Centers India - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Moksha Foundation official web site; web page: "International FACE Centers " [Friends of Andrew Cohen Everywhere] (viewed 22 July 1999). Directory of FACE Centers: Lennox, MA; Boston, MA; New York, NY; London, UK; Amsterdam, Netherlands; Cologne, Germany; Stockholm, Sweden; Sydney, Australia; Rishikesh, India.
Gadaba India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Tribes speaking Munda languages and extending over parts of Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, and Orissa include the Santal, Ho, Gadaba, Bondo, and Saora. "
Gandhi veneration India - - - - 1915 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1698. "The Gandhi cult... He is said to have been first saluted as a Mahatma himself by Indian admirers during his civil rights campaign in South Africa, which ended in 1914. but the real bestower of the accolade was the poet Rabindranath Tagore, who was his host on his triumphant return to India. Tagore was referring to him as 'Mahatma Gandhi' early in 1915 and wrote of him in a poem... championed the downtrodden masses. Gandhi did this a great deal more evidently than other Congress figures. His religious ardour and strict personal morals reinforced the cult which grew around him. The masses turned to him as a Mahatma long before they knew him as a politician... "
Gandhi veneration India - - - - 1915 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1698. "After his release from prison, however, Gandhi still had to endure the importunities of hordes of darshan seekers whenever he traveled. Many literally climbed over him, yelling, jostling and clawing. He was often in need of first aid for scratches on his legs. The superstitious credited him with performing miracles, which he could sometimes refute but not always. An English observer noticed his dislike of the cult. Gandhi seldom looked sterner than he did when confronting his worshippers. He tried again and again to replace the popular slogan 'Mahatma Gandhi ki-jai' ('Victory to Mahatma Gandhi') with others of a less personal kind. But his attempts to get rid of his unwanted and, in his own view, undeserved title were doomed to failure. "
Garo Baptist Convention India 170,542 - 2,098
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Gonds India 7,388,463 - - - 1981 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 220-221. "The Gonds form the largest tribal group in the Indian subcontinent, and perhaps even in the entire world. The 1981 Census recorded their population as 7,388,463 people. This figure should be regarded as approximate, since many Gond communities have become Hinduized and are no longer counted as Gonds. "
Gonds India 9,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 220-221. "Gonds: Location: India; Population: Over 9 million; Religion: Cult of the Persa Pen (clan deities); ancestor spirit worship "; "The Gonds are numerically the most important tribe in South Asia. Strictly speaking, the term Gond is a generic one that refers to numerous tribal peoples... Most significantly, they all describe themselves as Gonds, or in the local Gondi dialects, as Koi or Koitur. "; "The most distinctive feature of Gond religion is the cult of the Persa Pen, or the clan deities. Like many other tribes in the region, Gonds worship a high god known as Baradeo, or Bhagavan... Each Gond clan has its Persa Pen, who extends its protection to all clan members... "
Gonds India 9,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 220-221. "The Gonds form the largest tribal group in the Indian subcontinent, and perhaps even in the entire world. The 1981 Census recorded their population as 7,388,463 people. This figure should be regarded as approximate, since many Gond communities have become Hinduized and are no longer counted as Gonds. Nonetheless, even using conservative estimates of growth rates, the Gond population in India must exceed 9 million today. "
Gumanapantha India - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: Jainworld; web page: "History of various sects " (viewed 16 Jan. 1999) "Gumanapantha originated in the 18th. Century A.D. and flourished mainly during that century. It was prevalent in several parts of Rajasthan, and it is found now in some areas of Rajasthan around Jaipur. "
Harijan India 80,000,000 15.00% - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 295. "Harijan (Sanskrit; lit. 'children of god'). A euphemism coined by Mahatma Gandhi to refer to the untouchables of India. Inherently polluting to members of other Hindu castes, the Harijans stand outside the fourfold caste structure of Indian society. Yet Harijans comprise about 15 percent of the Indian population and number nearly 80 million spread over all parts of the country... many Harijans have adopted Christianity or Buddhism, whose egalitarian principles appeal to the underprivileged. "
Hinduism India 216,260,624 68.41% - - 1921 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 368. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.]
Hinduism India 239,195,136 68.24% - - 1931 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 368. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.]
Hinduism India 300,000,000 - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957), pg. 11. "...Hinduism, the faith of more than 300 million human beings in India... "
Hinduism India 300,000,000 - - - 1958 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Western Publishing Co. (1972). [11th printing; original edition: 1958]. Pg. 15. "...the religion known as Hinduism... is the faith of more than 300 million human beings in India and of about 15 million more elsewhere. "


India, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.