Adherents.com - Religion by Location


Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

To Index

back to India, Arya Samaj

India, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Arya Samaj India 467,578 0.15% - - 1921 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 368. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.] Listed in table as "Arya-Samaj "
Arya Samaj India 468,000 0.15% - - 1931 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 368. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.] Listed in table as "Arya-Samaj "
Arya Samaj India - - - - 1969 Chan, Wing-tsit, et al. (compilers). The Great Asian Religions: An Anthology. London: Macmillian Co. (1969), pg. 6. "The reform sects like the Brahmo Samaj and the Arya Samaj are fading out, as their teachings are being accepted and practiced to a large extent by the orthodox people also. Besides, the government has enacted laws incorporating all the social reforms advocated by such movements. "
Arya Samaj India - - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973), pg. 165. "Ayra Samaj, Hindu reform organization founded in 1875 by Dayananda Sarasvati, a Brahman from northern Bombay... the movement attracted many followers and achieved its greatest strength in North India. "
Arya Samaj India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 603. "More in tune with the rise of national consciousness was the Arya Samaj. In contrast to the Brahmo Samaj it attracted some grass-root support, primarily in the Punjab and the United Provinces (Uttar Pradesh).... In 1892 the Arya Samaj split into conservative and progressive groups. While retaining a substantial membership in Northern India, the Arya Samaj shared with Brahmo Samaj a fatal weakness: it rejected image veneration, avatars and yogic meditation, all of which form an essential part of mainstream Hinduism. "
Arya Samaj India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 64. "Arya Samaj. A society founded by Swami Dayananda in 1875 to reform Indian society on the basis of the traditional Vedas. Its conservative efforts to regain Hindu converts from Islam caused some interreligious tensions. Although favoring social and religious reform, it defended cow protection and some Vedic rituals. It continues to have a large following in Northern India. "
Arya Samaj India - - 14
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site; web page: "Global Directory: Directory of Arya Samaj in Asia " (viewed 24 Jan. 1999) counted listings in directory
Aryan India - - - - -1100 B.C.E. Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998), pg. 19. "Hindus. Over three thousand years ago, a wandering Aryan tribe settled on the banks of the Indus River (in modern-day India) and... "
Assam Baptist Convention India 24,360 - 266
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Assassins India 250,000 - - - 1969 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969), pg. 469. "Another, similar group of Ismailites were the Assassins of Alamut of Persia... Today some twenty thousand Assassins survive as a peaceful sect, living in the mountains of Lebanon. Another 250,000 live in India. "
attendance - weekly India - 42.00% - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "The University of Michigan News and Information Services "; web page: "Study identifies worldwide rates of religiosity, church attendance " (viewed 17 April 1999). "News Release: December 10, 1997 " By Diane Swanbrow. Table: weekly church attendance in various nations. "Source: Based on latest avail. data from... World Values surveys. Results with an asterisk are from the 1990-1991 survey; all others are from 1995-1997 survey. "
Auroville India 500 - - - 1978 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991), pg. 370-371. "Auroville, a New Age planetary village in India... During the decade following the laying of the foundation stone in 1968, more than 500 people settled in Auroville... in numbers of communities on patches of land owned by Sri Aurobindo Society... "
Auroville India 400 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 79. "Auroville. A utopian city five miles north of Pondicherry along the Coromandel coast of South India, established by a French disciple of the Hindu sage Aurobindo... Given the Mother's encouragement of individual autonomy, instead of four surrounding zones of activity, there are more than twenty near autonomous communities housing the nearly four hundred residents of Auroville... "
Baghdadi Jews India 6,500 - - - 1945 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 194. "Jews from Arab lands, called 'Baghdadis' after the city many of them came from in the nineteenth century... There were 6,500 Baghdadis in India in the mid-1940s (including refugees from Burma), mostly in Bombay and Calcutta. Few remain. Wealthier Baghdadis tended to migrate to England, Canada, and other English speaking countries rather than Israel. "
Baghdadi Jews India - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2081. "The Baghdadi [Jews], who live in the cities of Bombay, Calcutta and Poona, emigrated from Baghdad and other Middle Eastern areas in the 19th century. "
Baghdadi Jews India - - 5
units
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 206. "Nine synagogues still function in Bombay, although the two Baghdadi ones have to pay Bene Israel to help form a daily minyan. In Poona, too, two synagogues remain open: one Bene Israel and the other Baghdadi. Bene Israel synagogues survive in Ahmedabad and Delhi, a Baghdadi synagogue in Calcutta, and the oldest of all Indian synagogues in Cochin... "
Bahai Faith India 1,000,000 - - - 1997 Ganeri, Anita. Religions Explained: A Beginner's Guide to World Faiths, Henry Hold and Company: Markham, Ontario (1997), pg. 63. "Today, there are approximately 3.5 million Bahai's in the world... The largest Baha'i group is in India, where the religion has about 1 million followers. "
Bahai Faith India 2,500,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance; web page: "The Baha'i Faith " (viewed 18 Feb. 1999) "The Baha'i Faith currently has about 6 million members worldwide. There are about 2.5 million adherents in India, 130,000 in the US, and 14,730 in Canada (1991 Census). "
Baptist Church of Mizoram India 60,503 - 391
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Baptist Union of North India India - - 131
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Baptist World Alliance India 1,544,203 0.16% 8,688
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "; [BWA stats. in individual countries are sum of figures for member bodies of BWA in the countries.]; [County population figures for 1998 from United Nations data available here.]
Bene Israel India 4,000 - - - 1170 C.E. Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990), pg. 73. [In Bombay, India area] 'Bene Israel' Jews. 1,000 in C.E. 1170; 10,000 in 1950. Their first settlement probably dates back to 175 B.C.E... "
Bene Israel India - - - - 1799 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2081. "The Bene Israel appear to have had very few contants with Jews from other communities before the 19th century. In their comparative isolation, they forgot how to read Hebrew, but they remembered the Shema, an important Hebrew prayer, and observed the Sabbath, some of the holy days, some dietary regulations and the practice of circumcision. They adopted a number of religious beliefs and practices from their Hindu neighbours. For example, they did not eat beef, they objected to the re-marriage of widows, and they were assimilated into the caste system. The Bene Israel were known as Saturday Oilmen; a caste of oil pressers who did not work on Saturday. "
Bene Israel India - - - - 1800 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2081. "From the 18th century the Bene Israel migrated from their villages to Bombay where they became a more tightly-nit group, entered a wider range of occupations, and helped by other Jewish groups, strengthened their Judaism. "
Bene Israel India 20,000 - - - 1945 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 194. "The Jews of India are a varied lot, divided into distinct communities. The Bene Israel are only one of these, though by far the largest. When India's Jewish population was at its greatest (during the mid-1940s), Bene Israel made up two-thirds of its approximately thirty thousand Jews. "
Bene Israel India 30,000 - - - 1950 Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990), pg. 73. [In Bombay, India area] 'Bene Israel' Jews. 1,000 in C.E. 1170; 10,000 in 1950... They are divided into 'black' and 'white' Jews who do not intermarry. "
Bene Israel India - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2081. "...there is some uncertainty over the origin and date of arrival of both the Cochin Jews... and the Bene Israel, who in the past were dispersed in the villages of Konkan but who now live mainly in Bombay. The Bene Israel maintain that they came from Arabia in the first millennium AD. "
Bene Israel India - - 3
units
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 206. "Nine synagogues still function in Bombay, although the two Baghdadi ones have to pay Bene Israel to help form a daily minyan. In Poona, too, two synagogues remain open: one Bene Israel and the other Baghdadi. Bene Israel synagogues survive in Ahmedabad and Delhi, a Baghdadi synagogue in Calcutta, and the oldest of all Indian synagogues in Cochin... "
Bene Israel - Gora India - - - - 1800 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2081. "From the 18th century the Bene Israel... They were also divided into two sub-castes: the Gora or White Bene Israel, who claimed they were pure descendants of the first Jewish settles in India, and the lower caste Kalu... "
Bene Israel - Kalu India - - - - 1800 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2081. "From the 18th century the Bene Israel... They were also divided into two sub-castes: the Gora or White Bene Israel... and the lower caste Kalu or Black Bene Israel. "
Bengal Baptist Fellowship India 1,284 - 47
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Bengal Orissa Bihar Baptist Convention India 10,000 - 70
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Bhakti Hinduism India - - - - 1633 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 153. "Caitanya (1486 - 1533)... This view inspired a religious movement of Bhakti Hinduism, which swept over eastern India in the century or so after his death, and which is a vital force in the religious life of the country today. "
Bharatiya General Conference Mennonite Kalisiya India 9,987 - 23
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Asia/Pacific: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " INDIA: Bharatiya General Conference Mennonite Kalisiya... Members: 9,987; Congregations: 23
Bharatiya Jukta Christa Prachar Mandali India 4,566 - 48
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Asia/Pacific: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " INDIA... Bharatiya Jukta Christa Prachar Mandali... Members: 4,566; Congregations: 48
Bhil religion India 7,146,934 - - - 1981 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 114-115. "Bhils: Location: India (Southern Rajasthan and bordering areas of Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, and Maharashtra states); Population: 7,367,973 (1981 census); Religion: Tribal religions (97%); Hinduism "; "The name Bhil identifies various ethnic communities inhabiting the hills and forests of southern Rajasthan and neighboring areas of western India... "; Pg. 115: "Small numbers of Bhils have convert to Islam. Others have adopted Christianity as the result of the efforts of Christian missionaries during the 19th and early 20th centuries. However, census returns show that 97% of the Bhils follow tribal religions. "
Bihar Mennonite Mandli India 744 - 17
units
- 1994 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Asia/Pacific: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " INDIA... Bihar Mennonite Mandli... Members (1994): 744; Congregations: 17
Bisapantha Digambara India - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: Jainworld; web page: "History of various sects " (viewed 16 Jan. 1999) "The Bisapantha, according to some, is the original form of the Digambara sect and today practically all Digambara Jainas from Maharashtra, Karnataka and South India and a large number of Digambara Jainas from Rajasthan and Gujarat are the followers of Bisapantha. "
Bohoras India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 114. "Bohoras [or] Bohras or Buhrah. Muslim community in western India whose members, for the most part belong to the Isma'iliyya sect of Shi'ism and recognize al-Must'ali (1094-1101) as Imam and successor to his father al-Mustansir, the Fatmid, against the claims of his brother Nizar. Nizar's adherents are represented in India by the Khojas. The name implies the Hindu origin of the earliest converts to this sect. There are also Sunni and even Hindu Bohoras. "
Bondo India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Tribes speaking Munda languages and extending over parts of Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, and Orissa include the Santal, Ho, Gadaba, Bondo, and Saora. "
Brahma Kumaris India - - 850
units
- 1982 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995, pg. 14. "By 1982 there were 850 centres open in India... "
Brahma Kumaris India - - - - 1995 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995, pg. 12. "Although the leadership of the Brahma Kumaris remains Indian, and mainly Sindhi, and although it remains deeply respected in all parts of the world, the agenda, the outlook and the horizons of the Spiritual University have been subtly changed by the global scene in which it now finds itself. "
Brahmo Samaj India - - - - 1828 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 119. "Brahmo Samaj. A society founded in 1828 by Ram Mohan Roy. It was dedicated to the propagation of monotheism and the elimination of social abuses in India. It chiefly attracted westernized Indian ntellectuals. After undergoing two schisms it declined toward the end of the nineteenth century. "
Brahmo Samaj India - - - - 1828 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 603. "...Ram Mohan Roy. In 1828 he founded the Brahmo Samaj in Calcutta. "
Brahmo Samaj India - - - - 1857 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 46. "Brahmo-Samaj: a 19th-century Indian religious & social-reform movement... The movement was founded by Ram Mohan Roy (1772-1833) and organized by Devendranath Tagore (1817-1905). Membership was open to all, irrespective of religious denomination, caste, race, or nationality. In 1857 Keshab Chandra Sen became the 3rd leader of the movement. He came under Christian influence, left Tagore's samaj, and founded the Sadharan-Brahmo-Samaj. "
Brahmo Samaj India 6,388 0.00% - - 1921 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 368. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.] Listed in table as "Brahma-Samaj " Brahma-Samaj percentage: .002% rounds to two digits to .00%.
Brahmo Samaj India 5,378 0.00% - - 1931 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 368. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.] Listed in table as "Brahma-Samaj "
Brahmo Samaj India - - - - 1969 Chan, Wing-tsit, et al. (compilers). The Great Asian Religions: An Anthology. London: Macmillian Co. (1969), pg. 6. "The reform sects like the Brahmo Samaj and the Arya Samaj are fading out, as their teachings are being accepted and practiced to a large extent by the orthodox people also. Besides, the government has enacted laws incorporating all the social reforms advocated by such movements. "
Brahmo Samaj India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 603. Brahmo Samaj, Sadharan
Brahmo Samaj of India (Sen) India - - - - 1865 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 603. "Following the death of [founder] Roy in 1833, the Brahmo Samaj languished until 1843, when Debendranath Tagore (1817-1905) assumed leadership... In 1865 a schism occurred when Tagore's erstwhile disciple, Keshab Chandra Sen (1838-84), seceded... Sen's group, known as the Brahma Samaj of India, in distinction to the Adi (original) Brahmo Samaj of Tagore, embarked upon further reforms, including widow remarriage, caste intermarriage, and education for women. An ardent missionary, Sen was instrumental in disseminating Brahmo teachings outside Bengal, leading to the establishment of sister organizations in Bombay and Madras. "
Brahmo Samaj, Sadharan India - - - - 1870 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986), pg. 46. "Brahmo-Samaj: a 19th-century Indian religious & social-reform movement... The movement was founded by Ram Mohan Roy (1772-1833) and organized by Devendranath Tagore (1817-1905). Membership was open to all, irrespective of religious denomination, caste, race, or nationality. In 1857 Keshab Chandra Sen )1838-1884) became the 3rd leader of the movement. He came under Christian influence, left Tagore's samaj, and founded the Sadharan-Brahmo-Samaj. "
Brahmo Samaj, Sadharan India - - - - 1875 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 603. "Through Sen's initiative, Kirtana (devotional music and chanting) was introduced into Brahmo services. This was resented by the more rationalistically inclined Brahmos. Once again the more reform-oriented Brahmos split of, forming the Sadharan (general) Brahmo Samaj which concentrated on social service and deemphasized spiritual activity. "
Brethren in Christ Church Orissa India 720 - 24
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Asia/Pacific: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " INDIA... Brethren in Christ Church Orissa... Members: 720; Congregations: 24
Brethren in Christ Church Society India 2,435 - 37
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Asia/Pacific: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " INDIA... Brethren in Christ Church Society... Members: 2,435; Congregations: 37
Buddhism India - - - - -530 B.C.E. Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998), pg. 7. "Buddhists. In about 536 B.C. Siddhartha Gautama, a prince in India, left his home in search of wisdom. He spent six years living in a forest and listening to religious teachers... Finally one day he sat under a bodhi tree and... Siddhartha became the Buddha... "
Buddhism India 441,769 0.12% - - 1931 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 368. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.] Figure of 12,786,806 given, of which "12,348,037 in Burma. " Burma was then a territory, but "hardly India proper. "
Buddhism India 233,000 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 96. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "Today there are only 233,000 uninfluential Buddhists in India. "
Buddhism India 3,000,000 - - - 1969 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969), pg. 589. "Opposing such trends is the Buddhist revival in central India, where adherents are reliably estimated to number three million people, though critics point to the primariily sociopolitical significance of this form of Buddhism. "
Buddhism India 3,800,000 0.70% - - 1971 *LINK* web site: Invest India; web page: Religions of India (viewed 16 Jan. 1999) "The 1971 census produced the following statistics: 453 million Hindu; 61 million Muslim; 14 million Christian; 10 million Sikh; 3.8 million Buddhist; 2.6 million Jain; 2.2 million Parsis, Jews and others "
Buddhism India - 1.00% - - 1972 Raman, T. A. India; Grand Rapids, Michigan: Fideler Company (1972), pg. 44, 49. Pg. 44: "The population of the Republic of India is about 570 million... "; Pg. 49: "...today fewer than one out of every hundred Indians is a Buddhist. "
Buddhism India 3,000,000 0.50% - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 359. "Buddhism, which has flourished outside India, has only 3 million adherents in India itself... "
Buddhism India 6,000,000 0.70% - - 1991 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 179. Table: "breakdown of major religions in India, according to the population totals of the 1991 census, is roughly as follows "
Buddhism India - 1.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Buddhism India 7,000,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Buddhism India 7,000,000 - - - 1997 Ash, Russell. The Top 10 of Everything, DK Publishing, Inc.: New York (1997), pg. 160-161. List: "Top 10 Largest Buddhist Populations in the World "; (Rank: 10)
Buddhism India 6,767,482 0.70% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Hindu 80%, Muslim 14%, Christian 2.4%, Sikh 2%, Buddhist 0.7%, Jains 0.5%, other 0.4%; Total Population: 966,783,171.
Buddhism India 6,650,000 0.70% - - 1997 Russell, Malcom B. The Middle East and South Asia 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997), pg. 77. Estimates of % of population in principal religions, & est. 1997 total pop.
Buddhism India 8,340,240 - - - 1998 Ash, Russell. The Top 10 of Everything 1999. New York: DK Publishing (1998), pg. 76. Table: "Top 10 Largest Buddhist Populations in the World "; Rank: #8
Buddhism India 6,700,000 0.70% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 133. "There are some 6.7 million Buddhists in India, amounting to a mere 0.7% of the population. Found mainly in central India, many are recent converts to the religion and have been named 'neo-Buddhists.' Buddhists are also present in the northern mountains that fringe the Indian subcontinent. These are mostly followers of the Tibetan form of the religion, which is also known as Lamaism. "
Buddhism India 6,580,000 0.70% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 287. "Location: India; Population: About 940 million; Religion: Hinduism (80%); Islam (14%); Christianity (2.4%); Sikhism (2%); Buddhism (0.7%); Jainism (0.5%)... "
Carvaka India - - - - -500 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 157-158. "Carvaka. The materialist school (Darsana) of Hindu religious philosophy; often also called the Lokayata darlana ('Lokayata' may mean '[the views] held by the common people'; its etymology is uncertain). The origin of the name Carvaka is unclear, and it may have been a nickname for the school. Historical evidence for an actual school called the Carvaka is extremely slim. No independent primary source belonging to such a school has been found. The evidence that does exist consists of accounts of the Carvakas in the writings of other schools... it is possible that Carvaka was a foil contrived by other schools to establish their own positions. "
Catholic India 300,000 - - - 1557 C.E. Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 367. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "There were said to be as many as three hundred thousand Roman Catholic Christians [in India] as early as 1557. Today they number well over 3 million. "
Catholic India 3,334,938 - - - 1938 Ferm, Vergilius (ed.). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976), pg. 367. [1st pub. in 1945 by Philosophical Library. 1976 reprint is unrevised.] "The Statistical Survey of the World Mission (International Missionary Council, N.Y. 1938)... Roman Catholic church... reported 3,334,938 Catholics... "
Catholic India 6,000,000 - - - 1962 Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977), pg. 337. "By 1962 Catholics numbered some six million [in India], with the large majority of them concentrated south of an imaginary line drawn between Goa and Madras. "
Catholic India 16,016,000 1.70% 7,247
units
- 1995 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997), pg. 333-367. Figures are as of Dec. 31, 1995. Number used for "congregations " is from number of Catholic parishes.


India, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus
Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.