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Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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back to Greece, Dionysus worship

Greece, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Dionysus worship Greece - - - - -400 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1925, 1928. "There had been Dionysiac initiations in all reek towns, since very early times. Originally they were of the same type as race initiations. However, when a new and personal devoutness arose in Orphic circles, particularly in Eleusis, this affected the Dionysiac initiations, which gradually took on individualistic tendencies. During the Imperial period the Dionysiac Mysteries were a religion of the same type as the other Mystery religions. There were Dionysiac mystics in all towns, but Eleusinian initiations were held only in Eleusis and Alexandria. "
Donmeh - Izmirlis Greece 2,500 - - - 1900 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 90-91. "Actually there was no single Donmeh religion. This tiny sect was subdivided into three smaller sub-sects. Each one lived apart, had its own secret synagogue and private cemetary, and observed separate rituals... The smallest sub-sect, with some twenty-five hundred members, was known as the Izmirlis, after Shabbatai¹s home town of Smyrna. They shaved their beards but not their heads. "
Donmeh - Jacobite Greece 4,000 - - - 1900 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 90. "Actually there was no single Donmeh religion. This tiny sect was subdivided into three smaller sub-sects. Each one lived apart, had its own secret synagogue and private cemetary, and observed separate rituals... The largest sub-sect, with about 4,000 members at the turn of this century, was called the Jacobites...They shaved their heads but not their beards. "
Donmeh - Koniosos Greece 3,500 - - - 1900 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 90-91. "Actually there was no single Donmeh religion. This tiny sect was subdivided into three smaller sub-sects. Each one lived apart, had its own secret synagogue and private cemetary, and observed separate rituals... The second largest sub-sect, with some thirty-five hundred members, was the Koniosos. They shaved neither thier heads nor their beards. "
Eastern Orthodox Greece 9,180,000 90.00% - - 1998 "Reformer picked to head Greek church " in Christian Century (June 3-10, 1998), pg. 572. "Orthodoxy is the constitutionally recognized state religion in Greece, where more than 90 percent of the nation's 10.2 million people have been baptized into the church. "
Eastern Orthodox Greece 9,700,000 97.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 182-183. "Location: Greece; Population: Over 10 million; Religion: Eastern Orthodox Church of Christ "; "The Eastern Orthodox Church of Christ plays a central role in Greek life. During the 400 rules of Ottoman rule, the Orthodox Church was the main unifying force of the Greek people... Over 97% of today's Greeks belong to the Orthodox Church, which is described in the 1975 constitution as the 'established religion' of Greece. Although freedom of religion is guaranteed to all Greeks, the Orthodox Church enjoys a special relationship with the government. "
Eleusinian Greece - - - - -600 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1925. "Of far greater significance [than Orphism] were the Eleusinian Mysteries. In the small town of Eleusis, between Athens and Megara, ceremonies were held as part of the cult of Demeter. Originally these ceremonies were only for the inhabitants of the town and served to initiate members into the community; a person who had been initiated became a burgess of the town. When Eleusis was annexed by Athens about 600 BC, the nature of the ceremony changed. The person being initated no longer acquired political rights; the ceremony was now purely religious. All Athenians were now entitled to become initiated into Eleusis if they wished to do so; many of them did, and Greeks from other towns began to be initiated into the Mysteries shortly afterwards. "
Eleusinian Greece - - - - -550 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1925. "The Eleusinian Mysteries in this way acquired an 'international' [pan-Greek] character. A person who went to Eleusis to be initiated did so of his own free will and from purely religious motives. The complete development of the Mysteries was only possible because in the city of Athens a rich and highly differentiated culture had evolved which afforded the individual wide latitude for his specific way of life and religious beliefs. "
Eleusinian Greece - - - - 50 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977), pg. 34. "Much more powerful as a rival to Christianity were the mystery religions that were quite numerous & rapidly spreading during this period. They were syncretistic kinds of faiths that fused Hellenic & Oriental thought. The most important ones were the Dionysian & Orphic mysteries of Thrace; the Eleusinian from Eleusis, near Athens... "
Eleusinian Greece - - - - 50 C.E. Otto, Walter F. (Translated by Robert B. Palmer.) Dionysus: Myth and Cult. Dallas, Texas: Spring Publications (1981 - reissued; English translation first pub. 1965 by Indiana University Press), pg.16. "Many unquestionably old rituals are obviously connected with mythical happenings. In Eleusis the fortunes of Demeter and her daughter are acted out in public in the form of cult celebrations. "
Epicurean Greece - - - - -306 B.C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 305-306. "...Roman religion... included various moral schools, largely influenced by Greek philosophy... Epicureanism developed around the same time [as Stoicism], in a school founded at Athens by Epicurus in 306 BC, but with an opposite spin. Epicurus taught that the object of morality is pleasure, but that happiness requires prudence and honor. Even if pleasure is the only good and pain the only evil, one must distinguish between the pleasures of the moment and those that endure... Since Epicurus did not believe in an afterlife (although he accepted the existence of various gods...), for him and his followers the greatest good was to be free of fear and live as happily as possible, stressing moderation, self-control, and independence... "
Epicurean Greece - - - - -270 B.C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970), pg. 6. "Greek philosophy... Two great answers were given, on of which was wholly foreign to... Christianity... and the other only partially foreign, and therefore destined prfoundly to influence Christian theology. These were Epicureanism and Stoicism. Epicurus (B.C. 342-270), most of whose life was spent in Athens, taught that mental bliss is the highest aim of man... Death ends all, but is no evil, since in it there is no consciousness remaining. Hence, as far as it was a religion, Epicureanism was one of indifference. The school spread widely. The Roman poet Lucretius (B.C. 98?-55), in his brilliant De Rerum Natura, gave expression to the worthier side of Epicureanism... "
Evangelical Greece 20,000 0.20% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Hellenic Ministries " There are about twenty thousand evangelical Christians in the country -- just two tenths of one percent of the ten million citizens.
Greek Evangelical Church Greece 15,000 - - - 1972 Marty, Martin E. Protestantism (History of Religion Series). New York: Hold, Rinehart and Winston (1972), pg. 15. "Greece, which withstood a Communist surge in the 1950s and vacillates between democratic and repressive right-wing regimes, has never been hospitable soil for Protestant work, and except for the 15,000-member Greek Evangelical Church, is touched by only a few hundred conservative converts of missionaries. "
Greek Orthodox Greece - 98.00% - - 1992 Wolff, Michael. Where We Stand: Can America Make it in the Global Race for Wealth, Health, and Happiness? Bantam Books: New York (1992). Pg. 204-205. Chart
Greek Orthodox Greece 10,280,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Greek Orthodox Greece 10,403,734 98.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Greek Orthodox 98%, Muslim 1.3%, other 0.7%; Total Population: 10,616,055.
Greek Orthodox Greece 9,180,000 90.00% - - 1998 "Reformer picked to head Greek church " in Christian Century (June 3-10, 1998), pg. 572. "Orthodoxy is the constitutionally recognized state religion in Greece, where more than 90 percent of the nation's 10.2 million people have been baptized into the church. "
Islam Greece 270,000 3.00% - - 1986 *LINK* Web site: "Arabic Paper "; web page: "Muslim Countries of the World " (viewed 15 June 1999). [Written 1998.] [NOTE: Unreliable statistical methodology.] "In 1986... Muslim Education Trust organization [U.K.] obtained... 1971 census & [info. from] Embassies of the respective countires... 1971 census showed the Muslim Minorities countries had around 308 Million Muslim.. "; "...add (784.5M [independent Muslim countries]+ 308M) = 1092.5 Million Muslims in 1971 "; Table shows country, "population " [number of Muslims in the country], & % Muslim. Total adds up to 317,391,000, so these figures are apparently intended to be estimates for 1986.
Islam Greece - 2.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Islam Greece - 1.00% - - 1992 Wolff, Michael. Where We Stand: Can America Make it in the Global Race for Wealth, Health, and Happiness? Bantam Books: New York (1992). Pg. 204-205. Chart
Islam Greece 140,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Islam Greece 138,009 1.30% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Greek Orthodox 98%, Muslim 1.3%, other 0.7%; Total Population: 10,616,055.
Islam Greece 135,000 1.40% - - 2000 K. F. Bin Mohd Noor. "Muslims Statistics... for Year 2000 " [orig. src: Barrett. World Christian Encyclopedia, 1982] Table
Jehovah's Witnesses Greece 21,143 0.22% 439
units
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Adherent count here is from "1983 Peak Publishers " column
Jehovah's Witnesses Greece 26,980 0.26% 428
units
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site Adherent/member count is for "1997 Peak Witnesses "; Memorial attendance (annual sacrament meeting) for same year: 44,426.
Jehovah's Witnesses Greece 27,300 0.27% 437
units
- 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; This adherent/member count is for "1998 Peak Witnesses "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Greece 36,698 - 439
units
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Data from columns: "No. of congs. " and "Memorial attendance "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Greece 44,426 0.43% 428
units
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site From 1997 Statistics "Memorial attendance " column. Count of all who attend this once-a-year meeting, whether or not a "publisher " in full standing. Most would be considered adherents.
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Greece 43,417 0.42% - - 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; "Memorial attendance " column indicates attendance at yearly communion meeting.
Judaism Greece 75,000 1.20% - - 1937 Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990), pg. 161. Map: "European Jewry on the Eve of the Holocaust 1937-41 "; "Figures show Jewish populations in 1937 and percentage of total population. "
Judaism Greece - 0.10% - - 1992 Wolff, Michael. Where We Stand: Can America Make it in the Global Race for Wealth, Health, and Happiness? Bantam Books: New York (1992). Pg. 204-205. Chart
Judaism Greece 5,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Jewish Communities of the World web site (1998) Table: World Jewry. "collected our data from from demographic and other academic studies, community reports, and up-dates in the general media... consulted with experts to verify findings before reaching our assessments and estimates. "
New Kadampa Tradition Greece - - 2
units
- 1999 *LINK* official organization web site; web page: "Directory of European NKT Centres " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999). counted listings on directory.
Orphism Greece - - - - -500 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1925. "These Mysteries... presuppose an already differentiated society, in which there was no longer a primitive initiation ceremony which all members of the group had to go through. This new type of religion becomes evident in the time of Imperial Rome, although it had its beginnings as far back as the 6th or 5th century BC. Religious individualism makes its first appearance in the Orphic groups. The Orphics wished to lead a life of purity and without sin; many of them refrained from meat dishes, wine and sex. This 'Orphic way of life' was not one followed by many people and it was therefore individualistic from the beginning. One of the roots of Orphism was certainly shamanism... The Orphic circles in Greece never won any extensive influence over the population, but they established the principle of the individual who goes his own way, apart from the crowd. "
other Greece 70,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; "other " = NOT Greek Orthodox or Muslim
Platonism/Neo-Platonism Greece - - - - 270 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 306-307. "Neoplatonism was the closest the Greek world had to a mystical belief system. Plotinus (AD 205-70), a Greek-speaking Egyptian, developed his philosophy in Alexandria, which supplanted Athens as the cultural nexusof the world, before founding his own school in Rome. Influenced by the teachings (since lost) fo Ammonius Saccas (c. 174-242), Plotinus focused on the One, a single ultimate being of pure Unity, or Godhead. His aim, as with all genuine mystics, was union of the individual soul with the One, for which he developed forms of meditation that he practiced constantly. Although Plotinus's teachings bore some relation to Plato's philosophy, the term Neoplatonism is more convenient than accurate in describing the school, which had no structured religious practices... This philosophy influenced the Gospel of St. John... as well as Augustine and the Jewish philosopher Philo Judaeus... "
Protestant Greece 15,500 - - - 1972 Marty, Martin E. Protestantism (History of Religion Series). New York: Hold, Rinehart and Winston (1972), pg. 15. "Greece, which withstood a Communist surge in the 1950s and vacillates between democratic and repressive right-wing regimes, has never been hospitable soil for Protestant work, and except for the 15,000-member Greek Evangelical Church, is touched by only a few hundred conservative converts of missionaries. "
Protestant Greece - 98.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "; Protestant "includes all non-Roman Catholic denominations "
Pythagoreanism Greece - - - - -490 B.C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 308-309. "Pythagoreanism probably had little direct impact on Rome, but its very existence hints at a mystical substratum that may have survived into the Christian era. Pythagoras (c. 570-490? BC) was born on the Greek island of Samos, which had close commercial links to the Indian communty of Memphis, Egypt, that would have given Pythagoras access to Hindu and Egyptian knowledge. He later moved to Crotona in the Greek-controlled part of southern Italy, where he founded a religious order based on ascetic discipline and probably secret initiations... He taught reincarnation... taught that an original Monad, or One, gave birth to various duads... the order he founded probably came to an end by the middle of the 4th century BC... we don't have enough hard information to estimate his real significance on Western spiritual thought. "
Roma Greece - - - - 1400 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994), pg. 114. "In the 14th and 15th centuries the main centre of Gypsy settlement was in southern Greece, and they were also well established on the island of Corfu. Some probably continued up the Adriatic coast; others had already spread overland. "
Scientology Greece - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web page (OPPOSING VIEW): "Scientology Worldwide " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999); "Last Update on 10th Feb. 1999 " Number here ( "# congregations ") represent total of all orgs: Dianetic Centers, Celebrity Centers, missions, etc.; "CoS web sites have lists of Missions (1998) & Orgs (1996) from which the Table below is derived. Original concept and research by 'Inducto'. "
Seventh-day Adventist Greece - 0.00% - - 1993 *LINK* web site: "Adventist Images "; web page: "Membership Density " (viewed 25 June 1999); "Copyright 1996 - Pacific Union Conference of Seventh Day Adventists " "Adventist Believers - High and Low Density "; Table: "Ratio of church membership to country population "; Ratio: 1:38,462
Stoicism Greece - - - - -300 B.C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 305. "...Roman religion... included various moral schools, largely influenced by Greek philosophy... Stoicism, which was founded at Athens c. 300 BC by Zeno, borrowed most of its moral philosophy from the Cynics. Through Plato's influence, it was introduced to Rome, where its most famous adherents included Seneca and Marcus Aurelius. Underlad with a generally fatalistic attitude, Stoicism placed great emphasis on logical thinking and a knowledge of physics, which amounted to a kind of pantheism that saw God (sometimes referred to as the Logos, or 'Word') as indistinguishable from the world of matter. The Stoics' goal was to 'lead a life according to nature' and, like Cynics, their highest good was virtue, which was in harmony with humanity's true nature... "
Eastern Orthodox - attend weekly Greece - urban - 20.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 182-183. "Location: Greece; Population: Over 10 million; Religion: Eastern Orthodox Church of Christ "; "Over 97% of today's Greeks belong to the Orthodox Church... Religion plays a more important role in the lives of village residents than in those of urban dwellers, of whom only about one-fifth attend church on a weekly basis. Country life revolves around the local church and religions observances... "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Greece: Thessaloniki - - 1
unit
- 1999 "LDS Scene " in Ensign, Sept. 1999, pg. 77. "Three of Greece's four branches--Halandri, Ilisia, and Pireaus--are meeting in the new building [in Athens]; the fourth branch is located in the city of Thessaloniki. "
Donmeh Greece: Thessaloniki 10,000 - - - 1898 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982), pg. 89. "More than two hundred years later, in 1898, a learned British Jew visited Salonica [pg. 8: now Thessaloniki, Greece]... Some ten thousand Donmeh lived in Salonica, about half the city's Turkish populations (Turks were Salonica's third largest ethnic group, after Jews and Greeks). "
Catholic Greenland 100 0.18% 1
unit
- 1995 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997), pg. 333-367. Figures are as of Dec. 31, 1995. Number used for "congregations " is from number of Catholic parishes.
Evangelical Lutheran Church Greenland 55,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; Listed as "Evangelical Lutheran "
Evangelical Lutheran Church Greenland - - - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Evangelical Lutheran; Total Population: 58,768. (Greenland is part of Danish realm)
Inuit Greenland 25,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 832. "...the Eskimo... At the present time they number some 50,000, of whom approximately half are to be found in Greenland... "
Jehovah's Witnesses Greenland 72 0.14% 7
units
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Adherent count here is from "1983 Peak Publishers " column
Jehovah's Witnesses Greenland 158 0.28% 7
units
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site Adherent/member count is for "1997 Peak Witnesses "; Memorial attendance (annual sacrament meeting) for same year: 345.
Jehovah's Witnesses Greenland 163 0.29% 7
units
- 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; This adherent/member count is for "1998 Peak Witnesses "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Greenland 128 - 7
units
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Data from columns: "No. of congs. " and "Memorial attendance "
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Greenland 345 0.62% 7
units
- 1997 *LINK* official organization web site From 1997 Statistics "Memorial attendance " column. Count of all who attend this once-a-year meeting, whether or not a "publisher " in full standing. Most would be considered adherents.
Jehovah's Witnesses - Memorial attendance Greenland 334 0.60% - - 1998 *LINK* Jehovah's Witnesses official web site; section: "Statistics "; web page: "Worldwide Report " (viewed 16 April 1999). Table: "1998 Report of Jehovah's Witnesses Worldwide "; "Memorial attendance " column indicates attendance at yearly communion meeting.
Lutheran Greenland - 80.00% - - 1987 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: 7/6/87 issue of GLOBAL PRAYER DIGEST); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) The Lutheran Church, the state church in Greenland, claims 80% of Greenlanders -- including those of Danish extraction -- as adherents. Yet, Martens says the number of evangelical believers among the Inuit may be as low as one hundred people.
other Greenland 1,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; "other " = NOT Evangelical Lutheran
Protestant Greenland - 98.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "; Protestant "includes all non-Roman Catholic denominations "
Anglican Grenada 14,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Anglican Grenada 13,184 13.80% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Roman Catholic 53%, Anglican 13.8%, other Protestant sects 33.2%; Total Population: 95,537.
Anglican Grenada 20,000 20.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 195-196. "Location: Grenada; Population: 100,000 "; "About 65% of Grenadians are Roman Catholic. Most of the rest belong to Protestant denominations including Anglican (20%)... "
Catholic Grenada 91,000 65.00% - - 1985 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Total pop. (1985) 90,000. Approximately 65% of pop. was Roman Catholic, a lingering effect of periodic French domination. Remaining 35% primarily belonged to 3 Protestant denominations: Anglican, Methodist, & Presbyterian. Also a small Rastafarian sect.
Catholic Grenada - 59.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Catholic Grenada 54,000 59.34% 20
units
- 1995 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997), pg. 333-367. Figures are as of Dec. 31, 1995. Number used for "congregations " is from number of Catholic parishes.
Catholic Grenada 52,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Catholic Grenada 50,635 53.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Roman Catholic 53%, Anglican 13.8%, other Protestant sects 33.2%; Total Population: 95,537.
Catholic Grenada 65,000 65.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 195-196. "Location: Grenada; Population: 100,000 "; "About 65% of Grenadians are Roman Catholic. "
Catholic Grenada - 61.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Grenada - - 1
unit
- 1995 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1996), pg. 188-408. "Year-end 1995: Est. population [of country]; Members, [number shown in '# of adherents' column to left] "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Grenada 100 0.11% 1
unit
- 1997 Deseret News 1999-2000 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1998), pg. 267-410. Information from a variety of sources. Figures for year-end 1997.
Hinduism Grenada 2,000 2.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 195-196. "Grenada's total population is estimated at 100,000 people... About 85% of Grenada's population is of African descent, while 11% have mixed Black and White ancestry. The rest of the population is divided between Asians (mostly East Indians) and Whites. "; Pg. 196: "Most of Grenada's small East Indian population is Hindu. " [100% - (85% + 11%) = 4%. Half of that ('divided') = 2%, or 2,000.]
Islam Grenada 340 0.30% - - 2000 K. F. Bin Mohd Noor. "Muslims Statistics... for Year 2000 " [orig. src: Barrett. World Christian Encyclopedia, 1982] Table
Jehovah's Witnesses Grenada 331 0.30% 7
units
- 1983 Botting, Heather & Gary Botting. The Orwellian World of Jehovah's Witnesses. Toronto: University of Toronto Press (1984), pg. 53-59. Table: "1983 Service Year Report of JWs Worldwide "; Adherent count here is from "1983 Peak Publishers " column


Grenada, continued

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