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Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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Germany, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Lutheran Germany 14,700,000 - - - 1994 *LINK* [Orig. source: Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (1994 Update)] There are 14.7 million Lutherans in Germany in 15 church bodies
Lutheran Germany 14,290,400 - - - 1995 *LINK* Evangelical Lutheran Church in America web site; web page: "January 25, 1996 News Releases " (viewed 9 July 1999). Story: "More than 60 Million Lutherans Worldwide " [96-01-003-FI] List: "Countries with more than 1/2 million Lutherans "
Lutheran Germany 14,300,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* Evangelical Lutheran Church in America web site; web page: "January 25, 1996 News Releases " (viewed 9 July 1999). Story: "More than 60 Million Lutherans Worldwide " [96-01-003-FI] "Germany, where the Lutheran tradition has its origin, had the largest number of Lutherans in any one country, its Lutheran churches having a combined membership of 14.3 million, ahead of the United States with 8.3 million. "
Lutheran Germany 14,000,000 - - - 1997 "Lutherans by the numbers " in Christian Century (March 4, 1998), pg. 228. "The largest number of Lutherans in any one country can be found in Germany, the birthplace of the faith. German Lutherans number just over 14 million, followed by U.S. Lutherans, who number nearly 8.3 million in several Lutheran denominations. "
Lutheran Germany 23,895,000 29.50% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 178-179. "Location: Germany; Population: Over 81 million "; "About 29.5% of Germans belong to the official [Lutheran] Protestant church and an estimted 28% are Catholics. The Protestants live mainly in the north of the country and the Catholics in the south. "
Mennonite Germany 3,000 - - - 1963 Hostetler, John A. Amish Society (3rd ed.; 1st ed. pub. 1963). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (1980), pg. 68. "In Alsace and its neighboring principality Lorraine, there are about three thousand Mennonites today who are descendants of the Amish. "
Mennonite Germany 39,414 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Sum of two groups: "Arbeitsgemeinschaft Mennonitischer Brüdergemeinden (außerhalb der Mennonitischen Weltkonferenz) " and "Mennonitenkirchen in der Mennonitischen Weltkonferenz " [Mennonites in, and out of, the Mennonite World Conference.]
Mennonite - not in Mennonite World Conference Germany 15,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Arbeitsgemeinschaft Mennonitischer Brüdergemeinden (außerhalb der Mennonitischen Weltkonferenz) " in table. Source: REMID.
Mennonite Brethren Congregations - Independent Germany 20,350 - 74
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Europe: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " GERMANY... Independent Mennonite Brethren Congregations; Members: 20,350+/-; Congregations: 74
Mennonite World Conference Germany 39,610 - - - 1997 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site; page: "Mennonite and Brethren in Christ World Membership Totals " (viewed 8 Aug. 1999). Table: "Mennonite and Brethren in Christ World Membership Totals "; "based on the most recent data available... from 1996 or 1997... statistics indicate baptized members "; Dif. religious bodies: 7.
Mennonite World Conference Germany 24,414 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Mennonitenkirchen in der Mennonitischen Weltkonferenz " in table. Source: REMID.
Mennonitische Heimatmission Germany 220 - 7
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Europe: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " GERMANY... Mennonitische Heimatmission (MHM); Members: 220; Congregations: 7
Methodist Germany - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 478. "[Methodist] Churches having more than 20,000 members are found in... New Zealand; Germany, Ireland; Jamaica, Mexico, and Brazil. "
Methodist Germany 65,638 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Methodistische Kirchen / World Methodist Council: Evangelisch-methodistische Kirche / Kirche des Nazareners " in table. Source: REMID.; In comments column: "Mitglieder und Angehörige "
Methodist Church Germany 39,100 - - - 1997 *LINK* web page: "Religion News of the World "; collected by Ph. Keulemans - Update: 30/11/1998. (viewed 5 July 1999). Date section: November 25 [1998]: "Membership Dwindles in almost all German Protestant Churches " [Orig. source: Idea/GC] "...the Methodist Church ...survey conducted by the evangelical news agency idea (Wetzlar)... The greatest decline of 17.2% was recorded by the Methodists (39,100 members). Their losses were even more pronounced than those of the Protestant main line churches. "
Moksha Foundation Germany - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Moksha Foundation official web site; web page: "What is Moksha?/Moksha Foundation " (viewed 22 July 1999). "Based in Lenox, Massachusetts, Moksha Foundation centers... also... in London, Boston, Amsterdam, Cologne [Germany], Sydney [Australia] and in Rishikesh, India. "
New Apostolic Church Germany 395,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Neuapostolische Kirche " in table. Source: REMID.
New Kadampa Tradition Germany - - 22
units
- 1999 *LINK* official organization web site; web page: "Directory of European NKT Centres " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999). counted listings on directory. In addition, site states they propose to open new centers soon, but which I did not count in the 22 listed as currently open: "Proposed centres: There are plans to open centres in the following towns within the next few months: Frankfurt/Oder (Berlin, Dipankara Zentrum); Dusseldorf Zentrum für Buddhismus (Amsterdam, Boeddhistisch Centrum Ghantapa); Köln Zentrum für Buddhismus (c/o Amsterdam, Boeddhistisch Centrum Ghantapa) "
Nonreligious Germany - 21.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 80,000,000
Nordic Religious Working Community Germany - - - - 1932 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1966. "In 1931-32 these major [German Neo-Pagan] groups united as the Nordic Religious Working Community. They do not appear to have been either encouraged or attacked by the Nazis after 1933
Nordungen Fraternity Germany - - - - 1913 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1964-1965. "...German neo-pagan sects... three main groups... A third group, the Volkschaft der Nordungen, or 'Nordungen Fraternity', originated in German youth movement circles, c. 1913. Here again there was an eventual affiliation with the Deutsche Orden [German Order]. The emphasis was on the revival of the values supposed to be inherent in the ancient Germanic civilization. 'The aim and significance of our every action is Nordland' (the North-land or Nordic-land). Apart from these thre major gropus there were a fair number of very small ones, none of them well documented. "
North Elbian Evangelical Lutheran Church Germany 2,512,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* Evangelical Lutheran Church in America web site; web page: "January 25, 1996 News Releases " (viewed 9 July 1999). Story: "More than 60 Million Lutherans Worldwide " [96-01-003-FI] List: "Lutheran Churches with more than 1/2 million members "; "North Elbian Evangelical Lutheran Church (Germany) 2,512,000 "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of Germany - - 1
unit
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991), pg. 116. "Internationally, the Western Orthodox Church had 60 parishes, most in France, but including two each in Switzerland and Spain and one each in Germany, Belgium, and Argentina. "
Old Catholic Germany - - - - 1870 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 550. "Old Catholics. A group which separated from the Church of Rome out of opposition to Vatican Council I (1870), rejecting its formulation of papal infallibility. German Catholics, followed by Catholics in Switzerland and Austria, were in the forefront of this struggle. "
Old Catholic Church-Utrecht Succession Germany 28,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Altkatholiken - Utrechter Union " in table. Source: REMID. Listed in "Catholic " section.
Old Roman Catholic Church (English Rite) and the Roman Catholic Church of the Ultrajectine Tradition Germany - - 1
unit
- 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991), pg. 85. "A single church body with two corporate names, the Old Roman Catholic Church (English Rite) and the Roman Catholic Church of the Ultrajectine Tradition... These [sic] was one congregation in Hamburg, Germany. "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Germany 870,100 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Sum of all 14 groups in 'Orthodox and Eastern Churches' section.
other Germany 13,000,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; "other " = NOT Protestant, Roman Catholic or Muslim; other is "mostly nonreligious or unaffiliated "
other Germany 15,120,000 18.00% - - 1999 Dolan, Sean. Germany (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 9. "Population: 84 million... Religion: Roughly 45% Catholic, 37% Protestant, 18% unaffiliated or other "
Pfingstkirchen Germany 44,030 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Pfingstkirchen: Bund freikirchlicher Pfingstgemeinden / Christlicher Gemeinschaftsverband Mühlheim / Ruhr " in table. Source: REMID.
Pietism Germany - - - - 1670 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 2191. "Pietism: Generally, a religious attitude which stresses emotion and behaviour rather than intellect, a tendancy to regard depth of feeling and personal devotion as more important than creeds and doctrines: specifically, a movement organized by Philipp Jakob Spener, a German Lutheran, from c1670, often derided for what was regardes as its excessive and affected piety. "
Pietism Germany - - - - 1705 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 567. "Pietism. A reform movement in late seventeenth and eighteenth century German Protestantism... In its stricter definition Pietism centers around the renewal activities of Philipp Jakob Spener (1635-1705) and August Hermann Francke (1663-1727), both Lutherans. "
Pilgermission St. Chrischona: Evangelische Stadtmissionen Germany 9,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Pilgermission St. Chrischona: Evangelische Stadtmissionen " in table. Source: REMID.
Plymouth Brethren Germany - - 530
units
- 1996 *LINK* web page: "'Plymouth Brethren' FAQ "; "Author: Shawn Abigail; November1998; Version 1.6.1 " The February 1996 issue of MISSIONS magazine (from CMML), indicates there are 230 open assemblies and 300 exclusive assemblies in Germany.
Plymouth Brethren IV / Christliche Versammlungen / Freier Bruderkreis Germany 45,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Christliche Versammlungen / Freier Brüderkreis / Plymouth Brethren IV " in table. Source: REMID.
poll - accept commandment Thou Shalt Not Kill Germany - 97.00% - - 1999 *LINK* "Study Shows How Germans Rank Commandments " in Salt Lake Tribune (February 13, 1999), viewed online 19 Feb. 1999. [Orig. source: Adventist News Network, citing a survey published by Der Spiegel magazine.] "Ninety-seven percent of those surveyed said they accepted the commandment 'You shall not kill.' A small percentage of respondents believed it was important to 'keep the Sabbath day holy,' the magazine said. "
poll - believe in God Germany - 45.00% - - 1998 *LINK* "Briefly... " in Hinduism Today International (Apr. 1998); original source: Der Spiegel magazine "God is Dead " wrote German philosopher Friedrich Nietzche in the late 19th century. Today, for the first time in history, most Germans believe him. According to a poll by Der Spiegel magazine, only 45% believe in God, and just a quarter in Jesus Christ.
poll - believe in Jesus Christ Germany - 25.00% - - 1998 *LINK* "Briefly... " in Hinduism Today International (Apr. 1998); original source: Der Spiegel magazine "God is Dead " wrote German philosopher Friedrich Nietzche in the late 19th century. Today, for the first time in history, most Germans believe him. According to a poll by Der Spiegel magazine, only 45% believe in God, and just a quarter in Jesus Christ.
poll - consider 1st Commandment important Germany - 33.00% - - 1999 *LINK* "Study Shows How Germans Rank Commandments " in Salt Lake Tribune (February 13, 1999), viewed online 19 Feb. 1999. [Orig. source: Adventist News Network, citing a survey published by Der Spiegel magazine.] "Few of the Ten Commandments are important to most Germans, according to a survey published by Der Spiegel magazine. The commandment, 'I am the Lord your God, you shall have no other gods before me,' was found to be the least important one, with only 33% of those surveyed considering it important. "
poll - say religion important to them Germany - 14.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Stack, Peggy Fletcher (compiler). "Worldview?" subtitle: "Religion Important in U.S. " in Salt Lake Tribune, June 5, 1999 (viewed online 11 June 1999). [Orig. source: Associated Press] "A recent consumer marketing survey showed that 54% of Americans said 'religion plays an important part in my life,'... conducted by the Brand Futures Group of Young and Rubicam. Far more Americans rated religion as important than did other national populations surveyed: The Netherlands, 25%; United Kingdom, 19%; France and Germany, 14%. "
poll - say religion very important to them Germany - 13.00% - - 1997 "Religious Spirit " in American Demographics (Aug. 1998), pg. 62. Survey question: "religion is very important in their lives " National sample of adults in 60 countries by Diane Swanbrow at University of Michigan.
poll - say religion very important to them Germany - 13.00% - - 1997 *LINK* Morin, Richard. "Keeping the Faith " in Washington Post (Jan. 12, 1998). "World Values Survey conducted [by] University of Michigan... said religion was "very important " to them, a view expressed by 16% of all British respondents, 13% of those interviewed in France and 13% of the Germans questioned... latest round was conducted between 1995 & 1997, using representative national samples of each nation's adult pop. "
poll - say religion very important to them Germany - 13.00% - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "The University of Michigan News and Information Services "; web page: "Study identifies worldwide rates of religiosity, church attendance " (viewed 17 April 1999). "News Release: December 10, 1997 " By Diane Swanbrow. "Moreover, 53 percent of Americans say that religion is very important in their lives, compared with 16 percent, 14 percent, and 13 percent, respectively, of the British, French and Germans... "
Protestant Germany 33,311,040 42.00% - - 1990 Hargrove, Jim. Germany (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1991), pg. 130. "Religion: About 42% of the Germans are Protestants; most of this group belong to the Lutheran church. "
Protestant Germany 28,875,000 - - - 1992 *LINK* Government statistics web site (viewed circa Nov. 1998) Table: "Population by age groups, marital status and religious affiliation "
Protestant Germany - 47.00% - - 1992 Wolff, Michael. Where We Stand: Can America Make it in the Global Race for Wealth, Health, and Happiness? Bantam Books: New York (1992). Pg. 204-205. Chart
Protestant Germany 28,460,000 - - - 1993 *LINK* Government statistics web site (viewed circa Nov. 1998) Table: "Population by age groups, marital status and religious affiliation "
Protestant Germany 28,197,000 - - - 1994 *LINK* Government statistics web site (viewed circa Nov. 1998) Table: "Population by age groups, marital status and religious affiliation "
Protestant Germany 27,869,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* Government statistics web site (viewed circa Nov. 1998) Table: "Population by age groups, marital status and religious affiliation "
Protestant Germany 36,850,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table; Protestant is "mostly Evangelical Lutheran "
Protestant Germany 31,187,270 38.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Protestant 38%, Roman Catholic 34%, Muslim 1.7%, unaffiliated or other 26.3%; Total Population: 82,071,765.
Protestant Germany - 37.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 80,000,000
Protestant Germany 31,080,000 37.00% - - 1999 Dolan, Sean. Germany (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999), pg. 9. "Population: 84 million... Religion: Roughly 45% Catholic, 37% Protestant, 18% unaffiliated or other "; Pg. 110: "The north is predominantly Protestant, the south Catholic. "
Protestant - other Germany - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 178-179. "Location: Germany; Population: Over 81 million "; "About 29.5% of Germans belong to the official Protestant church and an estimted 28% are Catholics. The Protestants live mainly in the north of the country and the Catholics in the south. Other denominations, some with increasing membership, include Methodists, Baptists, Mennonites, and the Society of Friends. "
Quaker Germany 400 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Religiöse Gesellschaft der Freunde in Bad Pyrmont (Quäker) " in table. Source: REMID.
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho Germany 5,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Osho-Bewegung " in table. Source: REMID.
Reform Judaism Germany - - 1
unit
1
country
1818 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 602. "Reform Judaism (Liberal or Progressive Judaism)... The first avowedly Reform 'temple' was founded in Hamburg in 1818. "
Reformed Adventist churches (outside of SDA) Germany 800 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Reformadventistische Gemeinden (außerhalb der STA) " in table. Source: REMID. [ "outside of the STA ", meaning outside of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.]
Reformiert-Apostolischer Gemeindebund / Apostolische Gemeinschaft Germany 12,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Reformiert- Apostolischer Gemeindebund / Apostolische Gemeinschaft " in table. Source: REMID.
Revival Fellowship Germany - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site directory of assemblies (or contacts?). This is the number of listings in a particular country, but I'm not sure it can be taken as a count of congregations.
Rosicrucian Germany - - - - 1614 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 631. "Rosicrucians. The earliest verifiable use of the term Rosicrucian, 'rosy cross,' is an anonymous text, Fama Fraternitatis ('Account of the Brotherhood'), which created a brief sensation in Germany upon its publication in 1614. It purports to recount the life of a medieval knight, Christian Rosenkreuz, who traveled to Morocco and the Near East to acquire secret wisdom and an elixer of life... The Fama was followed by another tract stating that initiation into the Rosicrucian Order was now being offered those prepared to join the fraternity of hidden adepts. The documents are now generally considered hoaxes or allegories; Rosenkreuz probably never existed, although he may have been based on the Swiss alchemist and physician Paracelsus. "
Rosicrucian - other Germany 2,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Weitere Rosenkreuzer-Vereinigungen " in table. Source: REMID.
Ruhani Satsang Germany 500 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Holosophische Gesellschaft (Kirpal Ruhani Satsan) " in table. Source: REMID.
Russian Orthodox Germany 50,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Russisch-Orthodoxe Kirche " in table. Source: REMID. [Listed in 'Orthodox and Eastern Churches' section.]
Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia Germany - - 35
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site (1998) Counted listings in directory of parishes.
Sahaja Yoga Germany 200 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Sahaja Yoga " in table. Source: REMID.
Salvation Army Germany 2,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Heilsarmee " in table. Source: REMID.
Scientology Germany 30,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* "Germany's Clash with Scientology: High-tech faith claims organized persecution " in Hinduism Today International (Apr. 1997) The Church, centered in Los Angeles, estimates eight million members worldwide (including India), and 30,000 in Germany.
Scientology Germany 7,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Scientology " in table. Source: REMID.
Scientology Germany 30,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* "Lawmakers Condemn Germany Policy " in Washington Post online (7 Aug. 1998) Scientologists say Germany's policy has resulted in persecution and job discrimination for its 30,000 members in Germany
Scientology Germany 30,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* By WashingtonPost.com staff, April 26, 1997 Germany has been roiled over the Church of Scientology, which claims to have 30,000 members in Germany and 8 million worldwide
Scientology Germany 8,000 - - - 1999 Rink, Steffen. Post on nurel-l newsgroup list, 1 April 1999. Rink's organization: REMID, Religious Studies Media- and Information Service, Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e. V. Wehrdaer Weg 16 a, D-35037 Marburg, Germany. "Scientology proclaims that they have 30,000 members. Others say (i. e. former members) that there are only 5,000 to 8,000. If you ask local members they can' t tell you (or won't) the real membership of the local churches. But they have other datas, i. e. about their visitors or students. So you can confirm the number of 5,000 to 8,000. "
Scientology Germany - - 19
units
- 1999 *LINK* web page (OPPOSING VIEW): "Scientology Worldwide " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999); "Last Update on 10th Feb. 1999 " Number here ( "# congregations ") represent total of all orgs: Dianetic Centers, Celebrity Centers, missions, etc.; "CoS web sites have lists of Missions (1998) & Orgs (1996) from which the Table below is derived. Original concept and research by 'Inducto'. "
Serbian Orthodox Germany 200,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Serbisch-Orthodoxe Kirche " in table. Source: REMID. [Listed in 'Orthodox and Eastern Churches' section.]
Seventh-day Adventist Germany 35,500 - - - 1997 *LINK* web page: "Religion News of the World "; collected by Ph. Keulemans - Update: 30/11/1998. (viewed 5 July 1999). Date section: November 25 [1998]: "Membership Dwindles in almost all German Protestant Churches " [Orig. source: Idea/GC] "...survey conducted by the evangelical news agency idea (Wetzlar)... The Free evangelical Churches grew by 21.6% to a total of 31,000 members and the Adventists by 3.2% to almost 35,500. "


Germany, continued

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