Adherents.com - Religion by Location


Over 42,000 religious geography and religion statistics citations (membership statistics for over 4,000 different religions, denominations, tribes, etc.) for every country in the world.

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Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Unitarian/Unitarian Universalist Florida: Miami-Ft. Lauderdale 6,400 0.20% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993), pg. 112. Table 3-6: "Religious Profiles of Selected Metropolitan Areas ". Based on self-identification, phone interviews, conducted by Graduate School of the City University of New York, 1990. Total area pop: 3.2 million.
Universal Church of the Kingdom of God Florida: Miami-Ft. Lauderdale - - 2
units
- 1995 *LINK* Nascimento, Elma Lia. "Praise the Lord and pass the catch-up ", "news from Brazil, November 1995; dateline: Brazzil ". (viewed 30 July 1999, web site: RickRoss.com) "Of Universal's nine US temples, five are in New York; one in Newark, New Jersey; two in Miami and one in Los Angeles... known in the United States as the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God. "
homosexual Florida: Orlando - - - - 1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995), pg. 339. Table: "Gay Neighborhoods Around the Country "; "In many large cities, there are neighborhoods where gay people live, own businesses, or just hang out. Each has its own local designation "; Winter Park, Orlando
Orlando Christian Center Florida: Orlando 7,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table, grouped by state, columns for city, state, "size " (avg. weekly attendance), etc. From study finding all U.S. megachurches (congreg. w/ "consistent weekly attendance of at least 2,000 persons "); an independent, pastor Benny Hinn.
Albigensianism France - - - - 1100 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "ALBIGENSES: CHRISTIAN HERETICAL SECT named after the City of Albi in the South of France. It arose in the eleventh century, flourishing in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries before being brutally suppressed by the INQUISITION. It professed a FORM of MANICHAEAN DUALISM which regarded CHRIST as an ANGEL with a phantom body, proclaimed that the ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH was corrupt, and taught a form of ESOTERIC and OCCULT knowledge as the means of SALVATION. "
Albigensianism France - - - - 1200 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 326-327. See "Cathars "
Amish France - - - - 1693 Kraybill, Donald B. The Riddle of the Amish Culture. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press (1989), pg. 6. "By the late 1600s a group of Swiss Anabaptists emigrated northward from Switzerland to the Alsace region, which lies in present-day France, between the Rhine River and the Vosges Mountains. A bitter controversy erupted between the Alsatian immigrants and those who remained in Switzerland. The quarel came to a head in 1693 and gave birth to the Amish church... The decisive issue, however, that polarized the Swiss and Alsatian Anabaptists was the treatment of excommunicated members. Following the teaching of the Dutch Anabaptists, Ammann taught that expelled members should not only be banned from communion but also shunned in normal social relations... secondary issues, such as the excommunication of liars and the salvation of Anabaptist sympathizers, also hovered ove the dispute. However, the shunning of excommunicated members drove the final wedge between the Swiss and Alsatian Anabaptists in 1693. "
Association des Eglises Evangeliques Mennonites de France France 2,000 - 27
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Europe: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " FRANCE: Association des Eglises Evangeliques Mennonites de France (AEEMF); Members: 2,000+/-; Congregations: 27
astrology France - 53.00% - - 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982), pg. 20. "In France 53% read their horoscopes daily; and in Germany the percentage who take astrology somewhat seriously is 63%. "
Atheism France 1,990,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
attendance - weekly France - 21.00% - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "The University of Michigan News and Information Services "; web page: "Study identifies worldwide rates of religiosity, church attendance " (viewed 17 April 1999). "News Release: December 10, 1997 " By Diane Swanbrow. Table: weekly church attendance in various nations. "Source: Based on latest avail. data from... World Values surveys. Results with an asterisk are from the 1990-1991 survey; all others are from 1995-1997 survey. "
attendance - weekly France - 21.00% - - 1997 "Religious Spirit " in American Demographics (Aug. 1998), pg. 62. Survey question: "attend church once a week, excluding funerals and christenings. " National sample of adults in 60 countries by Diane Swanbrow at University of Michigan.
attendance - weekly France - 21.00% - - 1997 *LINK* Morin, Richard. "Keeping the Faith " in Washington Post (Jan. 12, 1998). "World Values Survey conducted in 60 countries and directed by the University of Michigan... attended church once a week, a figure that doesn't count attendance at weddings, funerals, christenings and baptisms... 21% of those surveyed in France "
attendance - weekly France - 21.00% - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "The University of Michigan News and Information Services "; web page: "Study identifies worldwide rates of religiosity, church attendance " (viewed 17 April 1999). "News Release: December 10, 1997 " By Diane Swanbrow. "...according to a worldwide study based at the University of Michigan. Fully 44% of Americans attend church once a week, not counting funerals, christenings and baptisms, compared with 27% of people in Great Britain, 21% of the French, 4% of Swedes and 3% of Japanese. "
Baptist World Alliance France 6,489 0.00% 111
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "; [BWA stats. in individual countries are sum of figures for member bodies of BWA in the countries.]; [County population figures for 1998 from United Nations data available here.]
Buddhism France 600,000 - 200
units
- 1997 *LINK* "Briefly... " in Hinduism Today International (Apr. 1997); original source: Religion Watch Most of France's 600,000 Buddhists are of Asian origin, "but millions are influenced by Buddhism, particularly in professional and intellectual circles, " said the report.; over 200 Zen, Tibetan and other Buddhist meditation centers have opened since 1960
Camisards France 200,000 - - - 1702 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 3). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 397. "The name Camisards was given to the Calvinist peasantry of the Cevennes and Bas-Languedoc regions of southern France, who at the beginning of the 18th century waged partisan warfare against the armies of Louis XIV. The word Camisard derives from camisa, meaning 'shirt' in the local dialect. It has been suggested that the Camisards may have changed their shirts frequently, to symbolize purity... The men would take up arms to attack a Catholic village or castle... The revolt of the Camisards broke out on the night of 24 July 1702... it is likely that the number involved never exceeded 4,000, or the number under arms at any one time 1,500. But these small, temporary units were supported by a population of some 200,000... "
Cathars France - - - - 1200 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994), pg. 28. "A similar structure developed among the Cathars of southern France in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, whose heresy was directly influenced by Bogomil teachings. "
Cathars France - - - - 1200 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 326-327. "Albigensianism. Named for the town of Albi in southern France where it originated in the 11th century, this sect held doctrine that was basically Manichaean; as in many heretical sects, its members railed against the vices and worldliness of the clergy. The church's organized persecutions of them in the 13th century are legendary for their mercenary cruelty. Crusaders were offered the confiscated lands of the heretics, whom they mutilated, tortured, and slaughtered by the thousands. "
Catholic France 45,300,000 - - - 1975 Norbrook, Dominique. Passport to France. New York: Franklin Watts (1986), pg. 26. "Religions: The government does not officially recognize any church, but the largest is the Roman Catholic Church, which had an estimated 45.3 million members in the mid-1970s, though less than one-fifth were regular church attenders. "
Catholic France - - - - 1978 Creed, Virginia. France. Grand Rapids, Michigan: The Fideler Company (1978), pg. 48. "The people of France are free to attend the church of their choice. Most of them are members of the Roman Catholic Church. "
Catholic France - 90.00% - - 1981 Barillot, Sylvie. Living in Paris. East Sussex, England: Wayland Publishers Ltd. (1981), pg. 12. "The official religion in France is Roman Catholicism. Around 90% of the French people are Catholics by birth... The Catholic religion requires its members to attend mass once a week on Sundays. In modern times this is lapsing and the churches are no longer as full as they used to be... A large number of young people do not get married in church any longer, and attend just the ceremony at the registrar's office. This is all part of the ever-changing trend of the modern world. "
Catholic France - 76.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Catholic France - 76.00% - - 1992 Wolff, Michael. Where We Stand: Can America Make it in the Global Race for Wealth, Health, and Happiness? Bantam Books: New York (1992). Pg. 204-205. Chart
Catholic France 47,773,000 82.10% 32,086
units
- 1995 1998 Catholic Almanac: Our Sunday Visitor: USA (1997), pg. 333-367. Figures are as of Dec. 31, 1995. Number used for "congregations " is from number of Catholic parishes.
Catholic France 43,150,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Catholic France 52,748,356 90.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Roman Catholic 90%, Protestant 2%, Jewish 1%, Muslim (North African workers) 1%, unaffiliated 6%; Total Population: 58,609,285.
Catholic France - - 27,862
units
- 1997 *LINK* Zenit. "DOSSIER: BRAZIL AND MEXICO HAVE LARGEST NUMBER OF CATHOLICS " on "Zenit News Agency " web site (online Catholic news); Archives: 13 June 1999 (ZE99061302). (Viewed 19 June 1999). "...figures given in the latest edition of the Church's Statistical Yearbook for 1997... Brazil is the country with the largest number of dioceses or ecclesiastical districts (262), while France is the country with the largest number of parishes (27,862). "
Catholic France 45,600,000 80.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 160-161. "Location: France; Population: About 57 million "; "About 80% of the French population is Roman Catholic, although fewer than one-fifth of Catholics attend church regularly. "
Catholic France - 68.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 57,188,000
Catholic France - - - - 1998 Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998), pg. 9. "Roman Catholic... Illustration: Chartres Cathedral in France... "
Catholic France - 90.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Wholesome Words: Worldwide Missions " by Stephen Ross, "First Edition, 1998 "; [original sources: The World Book Encyclopedia, c1998.] Table: "Major Roman Catholic Countries of the World "
Catholic - attend at least monthly France 20,250,000 36.00% - - 1985 Greeley, Andrew M. The Catholic Myth: The Behavior and Beliefs of American Catholics. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1990), pg. 266, 269. Pg. 266: "using the ISV [International Study of Values, 1981] and ISSP [International Social Survey Project, 1985] surveys... "; Pg. 269: "...proportion of men & women over 35 who attend Mass at least once a month... France, 45%; Hungary, 12%. " [Austria: 45% * est. 80% of pop. which is Catholic, (or est. 45 million) = 36% of total pop. attending mass monthly]
Catholic - attend regularly France 9,060,000 - - - 1975 Norbrook, Dominique. Passport to France. New York: Franklin Watts (1986), pg. 26. "Religions: The government does not officially recognize any church, but the largest is the Roman Catholic Church, which had an estimated 45.3 million members in the mid-1970s, though less than one-fifth were regular church attenders. "
Catholic - attend regularly France 9,120,000 16.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 160-161. "Location: France; Population: About 57 million "; "About 80% of the French population is Roman Catholic, although fewer than one-fifth of Catholics attend church regularly. "
Catholic - Carthusian France - - - - 1084 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 157. "Carthusians. Roman Catholic religious order of contemplative monks started (1084) by St. Bruno in the French Alps. The monks pray, eat, and sleep in solitary huts, coming together for community worship and one weekly conversation period. "
Christianity France 44,150,000 - - - 1997 Ash, Russell. The Top 10 of Everything, DK Publishing, Inc.: New York (1997), pg. 160-161. List: "Top 10 Largest Christian Populations in the World "; (Rank: 8)
Christianity France 45,624,000 - - - 1998 Ash, Russell. The Top 10 of Everything 1999. New York: DK Publishing (1998), pg. 76. Table: "Top 10 Largest Christian Populations in the World "; Rank: #8
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints France 300 - - - 1950 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 117. "1950... Approx. 6,550 members resided in the British Isles... 1,700 in Switzerland; 900 in Belgium; 800 in Austria; 300 in France; and 200 in Czechoslovakia. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints France 1,509 - - - 1960 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 135. "Membership in [France] grew from 1,509 in 1960 to 8,606 in 1970. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints France 8,606 - - - 1970 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 135. "Membership in [France] grew from 1,509 in 1960 to 8,606 in 1970. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints France 20,000 - - - 1987 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 135. "In 1987, he explained that the Church has grown in France to over 20,000 members. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints France 22,000 - - - 1992 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992), pg. 136. "By 1992 France... Six stake centers were located in Paris (2), Nice, Nancy, Lille, and Lyon. Over 22,000 members were on the rolls in France. "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints France 28,000 0.04% 122
units
- 1995 Deseret News 1997-98 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1996), pg. 188-408. "Year-end 1995: Est. population [of country]; Members, [number shown in '# of adherents' column to left] "
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints France 30,000 0.05% 123
units
- 1997 Deseret News 1999-2000 Church Almanac. Deseret News: Salt Lake City, UT (1998), pg. 267-410. Information from a variety of sources. Figures for year-end 1997.
Church of the Nazarene France 265 - 6
units
- 1998 *LINK* official organization web site: Nazarene World Mission Society Church Statistics: Churches; 8 Jan. 1998; total population: 57,188,000
Convulsionaries France - - - - 1731 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 516. "Francois de Paris... died in 1727.... On the day of the funeral, an old woman... was cured on touching the bier. Other miraculous cures were reported... during the next four years. But it was in... 1731 that... Visitors to the tomb of St. Medard began to be seized with convulsions... The Church of St. Medard had Jansenist connections, situated as it was near Port-Royal [France] which was a renowned centre of Jansenist scholars. When the cult of Francois de Paris grew, the adherents who became known as Convulsionaries were a group of Jansenists... "
Convulsionaries France - - - - 1732 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 516. "...in January 1732 the cemetary was closed by royal decree... But although the focus of the convulsionary movement was thus removed, neither the healings nor the convulsions were thereby brough to an end. Evidently the connection with the tomb of Francois de Paris was incidental, rather than essential. The movement spread into the provinces. Significantly, it found support among the aristocracy, and even Voltaire's brother, Armand Arouet, counted himself among its adherents. "
Convulsionaries France - - - - 1732 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 516. "The fame of St. Medard spread and the number of visitors multiplied. However, not all those who came did so for worthy reasons; on 7 August 1731 a certain widow Delorme came to the cemetary to scoff, and was paralysed for her impudence... Public opinion was still further roused, for political issues were involved; near-riots ensued, and in January 1732 the cemetary was closed by royal decree. "
Convulsionaries France - - - - 1758 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 516. "If we ask what the Convulsionaries actualy did to provoke those extreme judgements, the account of an interview which took place in 1758 between Lieutenant Bertin of the Frenc Police and a certain Dr. Dubourg of Paris is illuminating. Dubourg's testimony was restrained and factual. He was privately convinced that although the practices of the Convulsionaries were odd and indeed repugnant, there was no question of imposture or trickery... "; "...the Jansenist origins of the movement introduced a political element... and as a result the authorities adopted repressive measures. Thousands of Convulsionaries were imprisoned. This had the effect of driving the movement underground, where it later gave rise to competing sects before disappearing completely. "
Druidism France - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 723. "The Bretons have a strong Druid and Arthurian tradition from classical and medieval times; there were the famous prophesying 'Druidesses' on the Ile de Seine, and the enchantments of the Forest of Broceliande, near Rennes, where Merlin was imprisoned in a tree by the enchantress Vivien. It was only at the beginning of the present century, however, that Druidry became an organized force in Brittany. For several years now the annual August Eisteddfod has been held beside the beautiful lake at Paimpont, in the midst of the old forest area of Broceliande. "
Eastern Orthodox France - 0.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 57,188,000
Eglise Reformee de France France 334,000 - - - 1972 Marty, Martin E. Protestantism (History of Religion Series). New York: Hold, Rinehart and Winston (1972), pg. 17. "The most important [Protestant denomination] for all of France is the Eglise Reformee de France [with diacriticals: Église Réformée de France], with over a third of a million members. "
Federation of Evangelical Baptist Churches France 6,489 - 111
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Freemasonry France - - 1
unit
- 1732 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 8). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1037. "One of the most surprising features of Speculative Freemasonry's early history is the Craft's vigorous and speedy expansion in Europe. An English Lodge was founded in Paris in 1732... "
Gurdjieff France - - - - 1949 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 287. "Gurdjieff, Georges Ivanovitch (1872-1949). Founder of the Institute for the Harmonious Development of Man in Fountainbleau, France, where, through calisthenics and music he helped his followers to higher planes of consciousness. He claimed to base his teachings on those of a 'hidden brotherhood' in Central Asia. "
Hinduism France 50,000 - - - 1993 *LINK* "How Hinduism Fares in Europe " in Hinduism Today International (Aug., 1993, Vol. 15, No. 8) France: The Hindu community here is also small, about 50,000, consisting of some long-time residents and a lot of recent arrivals.
homosexual France - 0.70% - - 1992 Schmidt, Thomas E. Straight & Narrow: Compassion & Clarity in the Homosexuality Debate. Downers Grove, Illinois: InterVarsity Press (1995), pg. 104. [Orig. source: A. Spira et al., "AIDS and Sexual Behavior in France, " Nature 360 (Dec. 3, 1992): 407-9; P. Aldous, "French Venture Where U.S. Fears to Tread, " Science 257 (July 3, 1992): 25.] "A 1992 French study reported 1.1 percent of men and 0.3 percent of women having had same-sex relations in the previous year, 1.4%/0.4% in the previous five years, and 4.1%/2.6% ever. "; Pg. 197: "This study involved 20,055 subjects. "
Huguenots France - - - - 1598 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 10). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), pg. 1369. "Huguenots: French Protestants of the 16th and 17th centuries who were branded as heretics and subjected to severe persecution by the Catholic authorities: defiantly resisting their oppressors in the wars of religion which ravaged France in the late 16th century, they were rewarded in 1598 with the Edict of Nantes which granted Huguenots freedom of conscience and full civil rights; the Edict was revoked in 1685 by Louis XIV and many Huguenots fled to England and Prussia. "
Huguenots France 300,000 - - - 1598 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 330. "Huguenot... The Edict [of Nantes] was revoked by Louis XIV in 1685, leading to a great exodus, estimated as more than 300,000, of Huguenots from France. A later edict gave freedom to Protestants in 1787. "
Huguenots France - 10.00% - - 1598 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 330. "Huguenot. A name of uncertain origin applied to the Reformed French Protestants... In 1598 [Henry IV] granted the Edict of Nantes that provided limited toleration for the Reformed, who probably numbered 10 percent of the population at that time. "
Huguenots France - - - - 1600 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), pg. 347. "The Reformed church in France was known as Huguenot... "
Huguenots France - - - - 1685 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "HUGUENOTS: French PROTESTANTS who followed John CALVIN. They suffered constant persecution and over 10,000 were slaughtered in the SAINT BARTHOLOMEW'S DAY MASSACRE. Later many more were expelled from France after the Edict of Nantes, which gave them religious FREEDOM, was revoked in 1685. Leaving their homeland, they made significant contributions to many countries where they found refuge. "
ISKCON France 500 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10-14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Total members: 500; F/T: 400; P/T: 100.
ISKCON - full-time France 400 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10-14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "
Islam France 2,000,000 - - - 1978 Norbrook, Dominique. Passport to France. New York: Franklin Watts (1986), pg. 26. "In 1978, there were about 2 million Muslims. "
Islam France 2,000,000 3.80% - - 1986 *LINK* Web site: "Arabic Paper "; web page: "Muslim Countries of the World " (viewed 15 June 1999). [Written 1998.] [NOTE: Unreliable statistical methodology.] "In 1986... Muslim Education Trust organization [U.K.] obtained... 1971 census & [info. from] Embassies of the respective countires... 1971 census showed the Muslim Minorities countries had around 308 Million Muslim.. "; "...add (784.5M [independent Muslim countries]+ 308M) = 1092.5 Million Muslims in 1971 "; Table shows country, "population " [number of Muslims in the country], & % Muslim. Total adds up to 317,391,000, so these figures are apparently intended to be estimates for 1986.
Islam France - 3.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994) pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Islam France - 3.00% - - 1992 Wolff, Michael. Where We Stand: Can America Make it in the Global Race for Wealth, Health, and Happiness? Bantam Books: New York (1992). Pg. 204-205. Chart
Islam France 2,500,000 - - - 1993 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 118. "As a result of this influx, France's Muslim population in the early 1990s stood at around 2.5 million, Germany's at over 1.5 million, and Britain's at just under 1 million. "
Islam France - 2.00% - - 1993 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 13. "Muslims are estimated to constitute about two percent of the populations of Germany and France; one and a half percent of that of Britain. "
Islam France 3,210,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year. Pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Islam France 586,093 1.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Roman Catholic 90%, Protestant 2%, Jewish 1%, Muslim (North African workers) 1%, unaffiliated 6%; Total Population: 58,609,285.
Islam France 4,000,000 - - - 1998 "Muslims have organized their Belgian Community " from Le Monde, "reputed as the most serious newspaper in France, Luc, ROSENZWEIG "; posted to by Roger Gonnet. "It has been necessary for Belgians to organize some balance between the Muslim religion's different tendencies to be able to get a valuable vote. France has never been able to get this done, into its 4 millions Muslims community. "
Islam France 1,900,000 3.33% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998), pg. 160-161. "Location: France; Population: About 57 million "; "France also has 1.9 million Muslims, mostly immigrants from North Africa... "


France, continued

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