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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Bold Bible Living, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Bold Bible Living world 7,000 - - 3
countries
1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Latter Rain Pentecostals; pg. 282-283. "Bold Bible Living... Surrey, BC, Canada... is the organization facilitating the worldwide ministry of evangelist/missionary Don Gossett... his radio show is aired in over 100 countries. Membership: There are two congregations with an approximate membership of 100, both in British Columbia. There are affiliated churches in Barbados. In 1988 there were 4,000 partners who support the ministry scattered across the United States and 3,000 others in Canada and the West Indies. "
Bolivian Indian Mission South America - - - - 1907 *LINK* web site: "Christian Missions "; web page: "SIM History " (viewed 6 July 1999). "In 1907 New Zealander George Allan landed in Bolivia to minister to the Quechua Indians. Allan's Bolivian Indian Mission grew in the years that followed to become the fourth tributary, the Andes Evangelical Mission (AEM). "
Bomvana South Africa - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Bon Bhutan - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 118-119. "Approximately 75% of the Bhutanese are Buddhist... The Bon religion, which embraces pre-Buddhist shamanistic traditions, is also practiced in Bhutan. "
Bon Tibet - 100.00% - - 600 C.E. Rice, Edward. Ten Religions of the East. New York: Four Winds Press (1978); pg. 109-110. "...the religion of Bon, the indigenous, pre-Buddhist faith of Tibet... before the Buddhists came (in the seventh century A.D.)... "
Bon Tibet - - - - 650 C.E. Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 45. "In the seventh century AD, another type of Buddhism, called Tantric Buddhism or Lamaism, was introduced into Tibet from India. With the influence of the monk Padmasambhava, it replaced the indigenous Bon religion, while at the same time taking over some of the elements of this naturalist religion. "
Bon Tibet - - - - 1962 Dalai Lama of Tibet. My Land and My People. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co. (1962); pg. 239. "Before Buddhism was brought from India to Tibet, the bon religion was widespread in our country. It had originated in the neighboring country called Shang-Shung, and until recently there were still centers in Tibet where the followers of bon pursued deep study and meditation. In its beginning, I believe, it was not such a fruitful religion, but when Buddhism began to flourish in Tibet, bon also had an opportunity to enrich its own religious philosophy and meditational resources. "
Bon Tibet - - - - 1968 Norbu, Thubten Figme & Colin M. Turnbull. Tibet. New York: Simon & Schuster (1968); pg. 131-133. "We Buddhists believe that the Bon religion is quite separate from our own... I know two Bonpoda priests, both from Amdo, in the east. They studied first at the important Bon monasteries in western Tibet: Rala Yundrun, near Rong, and Thobgyal Drutsang Gon. Bon students from all over Tibet, from 2,000 miles away, come to study at these monasteries... The Bon people are represented in the government, and the government recognizes Bon monasteries and gives them large grants just as it does to any other monasteries. "
Bon Tibet - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 114. "Bon. The ancient, pre-Buddhist religion of Tibet and the traditions and practices that have persisted from it down to the present... The practitioners of this religion refer to themselves as Bon-Po. Bon is found in the more isolated... parts of northern and western Tibet, although originally its extent was much greater... After the mission of Padma-Sambhava in the mid-eighth century A.D. Buddhism emerged as dominant. Yet Bon continued to exist, partly in opposition to and partly in cooperation with Buddhism. "
Bon Tibet - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 41. "Bon... a general heading in Tibetan buddhism for various religious currents in Tibet before the introduction of Buddhism by Padmasambhava [circa 775 CE]... In the beginning of the 11th century Bon appeared as an independent school that distinguished itself from Buddhism through its claim to preserve the continuity of the old bon tradition. This school, which still exists, shares certain teachings with the Nyingmapas. "
Bon Tibet - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 765. "In western Tibet and pastoral areas of Qinghai and Sichuan, the native religion of Bon still exists. "
Bon world - - - - 1978 Rice, Edward. Ten Religions of the East. New York: Four Winds Press (1978); pg. 109, 115. "Bon, the faith of the Bon-po, is the indigenous, primitive pre-Buddhist religion of that part of Asia that includes not only Tibet, but western China, Bhutan and Sikkim, though in the latter lands Bon is less carefully defined and might be called nothing more descriptive than 'the old religion.' "; [pg. 115] "The state of the Bon-po today is unknown, for Tibet is an occupied country and the invaders have done everything to wipe out the past and to impose a socialist economy. "
Bon world - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 142. "Bon: The indigenous, pre-Buddhist religion of Tibet, Bhutan, Sikkim, and western China, whose members are known as Bonpo... After the entry of Buddhism to Tibet in the 7th century, Bon was absorbed and transmuted, so that modern Bon closely resembles Buddhism, although primitive elements such as animal sacrifice still persist in isolated areas. "
Bon - Black Bon Tibet - - - - 1968 Norbu, Thubten Figme & Colin M. Turnbull. Tibet. New York: Simon & Schuster (1968); pg. 130. "There is a sect called Black Bon, however, which seeks to throw off the refinements and moderating influence of Buddhism, and which still practices rites relating to basic primal powers. During the reignt of the last Gyalwa Rinpoche, the thirteenth, an edict had to be issued against the Black Bonpoba who were terrifying certain villages with their practices. "
Bon - White Bon Tibet - - - - 1968 Norbu, Thubten Figme & Colin M. Turnbull. Tibet. New York: Simon & Schuster (1968); pg. 130. "White Bon, which has taken pains to come as close as possible to Buddhism, even claims that Guru Rinpoche was born not of a lotus, as the Hindus claim, but as a man, and a Bon, in Shang Shung. White Bonpoba teach mystic contemplation, meditation, and the performance of correct ritual and the leading of a correct life. They also have scriptures like their Kyeddzog which teach tantric practices of possession and exorcism. "
Bondo India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Tribes speaking Munda languages and extending over parts of Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, and Orissa include the Santal, Ho, Gadaba, Bondo, and Saora. "
Bopgandi Zaire (Democratic Republic of Congo) - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Bor Sudan - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Born Again Movement China 3,000,000 - - - 1998 "A Tale of China's Two Churches " in Christianity Today (July 13, 1998); pg. 30. "...Born Again Movement (BAM)... an estimated 3 million followers. "
Bororo Brazil - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "; southern Brazil
Bosniac Muslims Yugoslavia: Sanjak 355,100 67.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Sanjak " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "Geographical Features: Sanjak is situated in the centre of the Balkan peninsula, between Serbia and Montenegro. In the north-west, it borders Bosnia and Herzegovina, in the south-east it borders Kosovo and in the south Albania. Area: 8,687 km2. The capital is Novi Pazar. Population: The number of the population of Sanjak is approximately 530,000, with Bosniac Muslims making up 67% and Serbs, Montenegrins, Albanians and others comprising the rest. Organisations: The Sanjak people are represented in UNPO by the Muslim National Council of Sanjak (MNCS). "
Bosnian Church Bosnia - - - - 1250 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 14. "...the Bosnian Church... seems to have fallen away from the Catholic Church in the 13th century, and to have operated on its own in Bosnia until the coming of the Franciscans, who tried to reassert the authority of Rome, in the 1340s. Thereafter the Bosnian Church competed against the Roman Catholic Church for a century, until its functionaries were either expelled or forcibly converted to Catholicism on the eve of the Turkish conquest. Throughout the lifetime of this Church, papal writers accused the Bosnians of heresy; and some of these sources identify the heresy as dualist or Manichaean. Because of these accusations, the Bosnian Church has traditionally been identified as a late embodiement of an earlier Balkan Manichaean sect, the Bogomils of Bulgaria. However, modern scholarship has raised powerful objections to this traditional theory. "
Bosnian Church Bosnia - - - - 1250 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 28-29. "The main rival theory [to the idea that the Bosnian Church stemmed from Bogomilism], which has grown in support in the post-war period, argues that the Bosnian Church was essentially a branch of the Catholic Church, probably a monastic order, which receded into schism and acquired some heretical tendencies; this theory, not surprisingly, has been especially popular among Catholic writers. The most convincing explanation, as we shall see, contains important elements of both the Eastern Orthodox and the Catholic theory. But the theory which has been most widely accepted for over a century, Racki'sidentification of the Bosnian Church as Bogomil, turns out to consist mainly of wishful thinking. "
Bosnian Church Bosnia - - - - 1400 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 41. "The Bosnian Church in its heyday (the fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries) enjoyed considerable power, and its dignitaries were used to sign charters and carry out diplomatic missions. Kings such as Stephen Kotromanic and Tvrtko, though not members of the Bosnian Church, had friendly relations with it; some of the great noble families seem to have belonged to it. "
Bosnian Church Bosnia - - - - 1400 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 42. "As for the ordinary lay members, it is possible that the Bosnian Church neer had a huge membership, since as a purely monastic organization it lacked the necessary territorial structure of parishes. And whateve the number of lay adherents in its heday -14th & 15th centures], the figure must have fallen during more than a century of state-supported Catholic proselytism. So it seems that by the time the Turks took over [circa 1500], the Bosnian Church was already broken and virtually defunct. "
Bosnian Church Bosnia 2,040 - - - 1459 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 41. "...the Bosnian Church was already severely weakened by the djed's action, even before the official persecution of the Bosnian Church by King Tomas in 1459. There was strong competition between the Catholic and Orthodox Churches to see which could mop up the ramainder of the adherents of the Bosnian Church. One Franciscan reported that many of the 'heretics' were joining the Catholic Church, but that the bishohp of the Serbs ('Rascianorum': inhabitants of Raska) would not allow them to be reconciled to Rome. "
Bosnian Church Bosnia 60 - - - 1466 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 41. "The action King Tomas took in 1459 was thus probably meant to preempt any further drift to Orthodoxy. The forced conversion of 2000 krstjani and the withdrawal of forty irreconcilables to Hercegovina must have broken the [Bosnian] Church's back; though we lack any proper figures for the number of monasteries, this would surely have represented the buil of the Bosnian monastic churchmen. When Gost Radin wrote to Venice in 1466 requesting permission to mirgrate there if the Turks forced him to flee, he asked whether he might bright fifty or sixty members of his sect with him: this probably represents the main remnant of the Church, including the forty irreconcilables. "
Bosnian Church Bosnia 700 - - - 1500 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 42. "In the Ottoman land-registers of Bosnia for the 15th and 16th centuries, which categorized people by religion, a few are listed as kristian (as opposed to the usual word for Christians, gebr or kafir, meaning 'unbeliever', under which both Catholics and Orthodox were listed). A few entire villages were given as kristian in the earliest registers, but the total numbers are very small: fewer than 700 individuals apear in these registers over the entire period. The historian who has studied this material (and who follows the 'Bogomil' theory) suggests that these kristianlar were the 'elect' of the [Bosnian] Church, and that ordinary members were being listed nder gebr or kafir; but this is surely wrong. The Turks were simply using religious categories: Muslm, Jew, unbeliever and kristian.
Bosnian Church Bosnia 700 - - - 1500 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 56. "If the main sorce of Muslim converts throughout that period had been the membership of the Bosnian Church, one would expect to find evidence of that continuing membership--large at first, and gradually diminishing--in the defters; but the defters show fewer than 700 individual members in Bosnia over nearly 150 years. We have already seen that there is good reason to believe that the Bosnian Church was largely defunct even before the Turkish conquest, and that the numbers of its lay adherents in the years before its collapse may not have been very large anyway. "
Bosnian Church Bosnia - - - - 1625 Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 42. "One Catholic priest, the Albanian Peter Masarechi, who visited Bosnia in the 1620s, referred in his report to 'Patarins' [probably remnants of the Bosnian Church] who live without proper priests and sacraments, 'with their Priest chosen from among the people, without any ordination'. But even this remnant was at last swallowed up, leaving nothing behind but unreliable collective memory, folk history and myth. "
Bougainville Papua New Guinea 160,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Bougainville " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "Bougainville is situated in the Solomon Sea between Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the Solomon Islands. Area: 10,000 km2. Population: 160,000 inhabitants. Languages: English and Pidgin are the languages spoken. Organisations: Bougainville is represented in UNPO by Bougainville Interim Government (BIG). The position of the BIG is that the people of Bougainville have the right to self-determination. Its military wing is the Bougainville Revolutionary Army (BRA). "
Brahma Kumaris Africa - - - 11
countries
1995 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995; pg. 12. "Centres in the African lands--in Botswana, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe--came under the Kenya Zone. Centres in nineteen European countries, togther with centres in Israel, Mauritius, Nigeria, and Dubai, remained under the London Zone. " [South Africa was in the Sydney Zone.]
Brahma Kumaris Australia 500 - 25
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The Brahma Kumaris arrived in Australia in 1975 and have 25 centres and an estimated 500 members. "
Brahma Kumaris Denmark - - - - 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "Corresponding figures, i.e. a dedicated membership of 30 to 150 in Denmark, are found in groups such as Brahma Kumaris, Elan Vital, Soka Gakkai and Sahaj Marg according to their own information. "
Brahma Kumaris Germany 300 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Brahma Kumaris " in table. Source: REMID.
Brahma Kumaris India - - 850
units
- 1982 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995; pg. 14. "By 1982 there were 850 centres open in India... "
Brahma Kumaris India - - - - 1995 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995; pg. 12. "Although the leadership of the Brahma Kumaris remains Indian, and mainly Sindhi, and although it remains deeply respected in all parts of the world, the agenda, the outlook and the horizons of the Spiritual University have been subtly changed by the global scene in which it now finds itself. "
Brahma Kumaris Russia 800 - 7
units
- 1995 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995; pg. 12. "Russia, which now has four centres, three sub-centres, and 800 members came under the Delhi Zone. "
Brahma Kumaris United Kingdom: Britain 800 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Listed in table as "Brahmakumaris "
Brahma Kumaris United Kingdom: Britain 1,200 - - - 1999 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... Brahma Kumaris: Britain: 1,200 'regular students'... " [Data from religious organization: Sister Maureen Goodman, Global Co-operation House, London. She added that there are no figures for those who are more loosely connected, who have, e.g. taken BK courses.]
Brahma Kumaris United Kingdom: Great Britain 815 - - - 1992 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995; pg. 16. "When it is considered that there were, on the ninth of May 1992, only 815 Brahma Kumaris in the whole of Great Britain, it is striking to contemplate the effectiveness and the scope of their activity. "
Brahma Kumaris world - - 920
units
36
countries
1982 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995; pg. 14. "By 1982 there were 850 centres open in India and seventy centres in 35 countries abroad... "
Brahma Kumaris world - - 70
units
- 1982 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995; pg. 14. "By 1982 there were 850 centres open in India and seventy centres in 35 countries abroad... "
Brahma Kumaris world 35,000 - - - 1993 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Orig. source: Adherents.com] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... Brahma Kumaris: Britain: 1,200 'regular students'; Outside India: 5,715 (1992) (Whaling); World: 35,000 (1993) "
Brahma Kumaris world 350,000 - - - 1993 O'Brien, J. & M. Palmer. The State of Religion Atlas. Simon & Schuster: New York (1993); pg. 35. New Religious Movements map ( "committed adherents "): "Brahma Kumaris: World Spiritual University 350,000 " Founded in 1937.
Brahma Kumaris world - - - 70
countries
1995 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995; pg. 12. "The first significant centre was set up in London at the beginning of the 1970s... In twenty years, spearheaded by and from the London centre, they have come into being 212 centres and 80 sub-centres in 70 countries. " [This does not include India's centres.]
Brahma Kumaris world - - - - 1995 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995; pg. 12. "Nevertheless the significance of the spread of the Brahma Kumaris into the rest of the world should not be underestimated. Although the number of committed members are small [5715 outside India, 1992], they are swollen considerably by others who have taken the Brahma Kumari course, and by others who are sympathetic to the Brahma Kumaris but have never fully joined them. "
Brahma Kumaris world 400,000 - 4,000
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "So far, 65 religious groups and associations have completed a questionnaire and are listed below... Brahma Kumaris Raja Yoga Centres: This movement originated in Karachi, India, in 1936. The founder of the Brahma Kumaris is Brahma Baba, though he is not worshipped as a guru... Worldwide, this path has 4000 centres and approximately 400,000 members. "
Brahma Kumaris world - except India 5,715 - - - 1992 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... Brahma Kumaris: Britain: 1,200 'regular students'; Outside India: 5,715 (1992) (Whaling); World: 35,000 (1993)... "
Brahma Kumaris world - except India 5,715 - - - 1995 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995; pg. 12. "In order to organize the work as it expanded different zones were brought into being to help out and take over from the London centre. Russia [is in] Delhi Zone. Centres in the African lands--in Botswana, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Tanzania, Zambia & Zimbabwe--came under the Kenya Zone. Centres in nineteen European countries, togther with centres in Israel, Mauritius, Nigeria, & Dubai, remained [in] London Zone. Under the New York Zone came centres in North, Central and South America: Argentina, Jamaica, Mexico, Surinam, Trinidad, & the U.S. And finally under the Sydney Zone... Australia, China, Fiji, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, Sri Lanka, & Thailand. given the strict standards of the Brahma Kumaris their growth has been striking... the numbers are not vast. [In] May 1992 the numbers outside India amounted to 5715 and it is clear that the preponderance of Brahma Kumaris is to be found in India. "
Brahma Kumaris world - except India - - 292
units
- 1995 Whaling, F. "Brahma Kumaris " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 1, 1995; pg. 12. "The death of the founder usually represents a time of crisis in the formation of a new religious movement. In the case of Prajapita Brahma this was not so. He was succeeded by the present leader Dadi Prakashmani and other co-leaders, and the work not only continued without diminishment it also began to grow rapidly. This growth took two main forms. First, and importantly, the university began to grow overseas. The first significant centre was set up in London at the beginning of the 1970s and a gifted leader, Dadi Janki, arrived to lead it. From London expansion occurred into the main cities of Britain, into continental Europe, and into the rest of the world. This growth was gradual yet sure. In twenty years, spearheaded by and from the London centre, they have come into being 212 centres and 80 sub-centres in 70 countries. "
Brahman India: Assam - 2.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 126. "Around 12% of Hindus in the upper Ganges plains are Brahmans. However, the numbers of Brahmans drop dramatically in areas distant from the Aryan heartland. In Assam, Orissa, and Tamil Nadu, for example, they make up less than 3% of the Hindu population. " [Other sources indicate Assam is 67% Hindu. 67% * .03% = 2%]
Brahman India: Kashmir - 35.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 126. "Although Brahmans are found throughout India and Nepal, they are not spread evenly over the subcontinent. Their highest concentration is in Kashmir, where they form 35% of the Hindu population. "
Brahman India: Orissa - 2.88% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 126. "Around 12% of Hindus in the upper Ganges plains are Brahmans. However, the numbers of Brahmans drop dramatically in areas distant from the Aryan heartland. In Assam, Orissa, and Tamil Nadu, for example, they make up less than 3% of the Hindu population. " [Other sources indicate Orissa is 96% Hindu. 96% * .03% = 2.88%]
Brahman India: Tamil Nadu - 2.66% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 126. "Around 12% of Hindus in the upper Ganges plains are Brahmans. However, the numbers of Brahmans drop dramatically in areas distant from the Aryan heartland. In Assam, Orissa, and Tamil Nadu, for example, they make up less than 3% of the Hindu population. " [Other sources indicate Tamil Nadu is 88.7% Hindu. 88.7% * .03% = 2.66%]
Brahman world 50,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 125-126. "Brahmans: Location: India; Nepal; Population: 45 - 50 million; Religion: Hinduism "; "Brahmans are members of the first and highest-ranked of the four varnas or classes of traditional Hindu society... Brahmans make up about 6% of all Hindus, or roughly 45 to 50 million people. Rather than being a single caste, Brahmans form a bewildering array of subgroups... Today there are over 1,800 subdivisions of Brahmans... "
Brahmo Samaj India - - - - 1828 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 119. "Brahmo Samaj. A society founded in 1828 by Ram Mohan Roy. It was dedicated to the propagation of monotheism and the elimination of social abuses in India. It chiefly attracted westernized Indian ntellectuals. After undergoing two schisms it declined toward the end of the nineteenth century. "
Brahmo Samaj India - - - - 1828 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 603. "...Ram Mohan Roy. In 1828 he founded the Brahmo Samaj in Calcutta. "
Brahmo Samaj India - - - - 1857 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 46. "Brahmo-Samaj: a 19th-century Indian religious & social-reform movement... The movement was founded by Ram Mohan Roy (1772-1833) and organized by Devendranath Tagore (1817-1905). Membership was open to all, irrespective of religious denomination, caste, race, or nationality. In 1857 Keshab Chandra Sen became the 3rd leader of the movement. He came under Christian influence, left Tagore's samaj, and founded the Sadharan-Brahmo-Samaj. "
Brahmo Samaj India 6,388 0.00% - - 1921 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 368. Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.] Listed in table as "Brahma-Samaj " Brahma-Samaj percentage: .002% rounds to two digits to .00%.
Brahmo Samaj India 5,378 0.00% - - 1931 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 368. Table: "The latest census gives the following enumeration of the adherents... " [1921 and 1931 figures.] Listed in table as "Brahma-Samaj "
Brahmo Samaj India - - - - 1969 Chan, Wing-tsit, et al. (compilers). The Great Asian Religions: An Anthology. London: Macmillian Co. (1969); pg. 6. "The reform sects like the Brahmo Samaj and the Arya Samaj are fading out, as their teachings are being accepted and practiced to a large extent by the orthodox people also. Besides, the government has enacted laws incorporating all the social reforms advocated by such movements. "
Brahmo Samaj India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 603. Brahmo Samaj, Sadharan
Brahmo Samaj world 6,388 - - - 1921 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 87. "A modern eclectic reform movement in Hinduism founded by Ram Mohan Roy in 1828, called first Brahma Sabha... According to the last [Indian] census (1931) there were 5,378 members of the society, [down from 6,388 in 1921 report]. "
Brahmo Samaj world 5,378 - - - 1931 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 87. "A modern eclectic reform movement in Hinduism founded by Ram Mohan Roy in 1828, called first Brahma Sabha... According to the last [Indian] census (1931) there were 5,378 members of the society, [down from 6,388 in 1921 report]. "


Brahmo Samaj, continued

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