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Index

back to Black Muslims, Trinidad and Tobago

Black Muslims, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Black Muslims Trinidad and Tobago - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 423-424. "Location: Trinidad and Tobago; Population: 1.3 million "; "Hindus account for 25% of the Trinidad and Tobago's population, and Muslims for 6%. Some Africans are also turning to Islam, but in their own organizations (through the 'Black Muslim') movement, rather than those of their East Indian neighbors. "
Black Muslims USA 0 0.00% - - 1900 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States
Black Muslims USA - - - - 1930 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 437. "The Black Muslim movement in the U.S. was founded by a traveling salesman named Wallace Fard, who arrived in the States from Arabia in 1930 and settled among the black community in Detroit. "
Black Muslims USA 15,000 - - - 1962 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 227. "...a couple of decades ago... Elijah Muhammad, claimed to have 'half a million believers.' Probably a true head count would have totalled only about fifteen thousand disciples with nearly a hundred thousand more hangers-on. "
Black Muslims USA 100,000 - 80
units
- 1964 Laue, James H. "A Contemporary Revitalization Movement in American Race Relations: The 'Black Muslims' " in Social Forces (March 1964, vol. 42, no. 3); pg. 315. "The [Black] Muslim movement, according to the most accurate guesses, encompasses less than 100,000 members (some estimates run as low as 5,000) organized in some 80 'Temples of Islam' throughout the country. Muslim leaders do not release exact figures. "
Black Muslims USA 300,000 - - - 1965 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 60-61. "Black Muslim movement... The flaming preaching of Malcom X helped build Black Muslim membership to more than 300,000, but... membership began to decline when Malcom X was murdered... in 1965. "
Black Muslims USA 100,000 - - - 1965 Wallechinsky, David & Irving Wallace; The People's Almanac; Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1975); pg. 1269. List of "Major World Religions ": "With the help of an outstanding preacher named Malcom X, who was assassinated in 1965, membership swelled to 100,000. "
Black Muslims USA 200,000 0.10% - - 1970 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States
Black Muslims USA - - - - 1985 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 437. "When Elijah Muhammad died in 1975, his seventh son, Wallace Deen Muhammad, now known as Warith Deen Mohammed, took charge of the Nation of Islam. Rejecting his father's teachings, he nonviolently returned the Black Muslims to conventional Sunni Islam. In 1985 he formally dissolved the movement, and its members became integrated with mainstream Islam, a continuing process referred to by African American Muslims as 'the change' or 'the second experience.' "
Black Muslims USA 1,250,000 0.50% - - 1990 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States
Black Muslims USA 750,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 60-61. "Black Muslim movement in the U.S. ... Today membership claims vary from 100,000 to 750,000; some students of the movement think it is much less than 100,000. "
Black Muslims USA 1,000,000 - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 276. "There are 4 million followers of Islam in the U.S., about one quarter Black Muslims. That means there are more Muslims than Episcopalians. In America, where WASPs are better known that imams, that represents quite a crossover. "
Black Muslims USA - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "BLACK MUSLIMS... founded by F. W. Fard around 1930... Today it is a fast growing movement with an impressive record of social action among American Blacks. The most famous member of the movement was MALCOLM X who was assassinated in 1965. "
Black Muslims USA 1,400,000 0.50% - - 1995 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States
Black Muslims USA 2,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* "Divining the future of black churches " (INSIGHT section, Saturday, October 31, 1998) By Ervin Dyer, Post-Gazette Staff Writer. Published in Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. "Today, there are an estimated 2 million black Muslims in America, and [C. Eric] Lincoln's work is credited with bringing them out of the shadows. "
Black Muslims USA 1,650,000 0.60% - - 2000 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States. Year 2000 projection done in 1995.
Black Muslims - core USA 25,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 2). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 276. "It is estimated that there are over 25,000 'hard core' Black Muslims in the United States today. "
black separatists and black nationalist groups Alabama - - 2
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups California - - 4
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups Florida - - 2
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups Georgia, USA - - 3
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups Illinois - - 3
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups Louisiana - - 1
unit
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups Maryland - - 3
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups Massachusetts - - 3
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups Michigan - - 2
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups Mississippi - - 1
unit
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups Nevada - - 1
unit
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups New Jersey - - 4
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups New York - - 4
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups North Carolina - - 2
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups Pennsylvania - - 7
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups South Carolina - - 2
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups Texas - - 4
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 78-79. Pg. 78-79: "Active Hate Groups in the United States in 2000 [map]... Source: Southern Poverty Law Center "
black separatists and black nationalist groups USA - - 21
units
- 1999 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 76. "Not listed in the chart are 48 black separatist and black nationalist groups. That figure is a dramatic increase over the 21 listed for 1999. " [Source: Southern Poverty Law Center.]
black separatists and black nationalist groups USA - - 48
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 76. "Not listed in the chart are 48 black separatist and black nationalist groups. That figure is a dramatic increase over the 21 listed for 1999. Characterized as racial hate groups for their black nationalist, black supremacist, and anti-Semitic views, most of these groups are religious in nature, and are counterparts to Christian Identity. " [Source: Southern Poverty Law Center.]
black separatists and black nationalist groups USA - - 48
units
- 2000 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 77. Pg. 77: "Figure 3.2 shows a map of the 2000 geographical distribution of 602 racial hate groups "; Pg. 79: [Key to map] Ku Klux Klan: 110; Neo-Nazi: 180; Racist Skinhead: 39; Christian Identity: 32; Black Separatist: 48; Neo-Confederate; Other: 105 [Source: Southern Poverty Law Center.]
Black Tai Asia - Southeast - - - 2
countries
1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 712. "For example, among the Black Tai of Laos and northern Vietnam there is a hereditay priesthood (mo) from which the chief priests are drawn... "
Blackfoot Montana 14,000 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 34. "Blackfeet... The population, estimated at 15,000 in 1780, is approximately 14,000 in Montana today, half living on the reservation. "
Blackfoot North America 15,000 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 34. "Blackfeet... The population, estimated at 15,000 in 1780... "
Blackfoot USA 32,234 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Blackfoot USA 32,234 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Blue Creek Evangelical Mennonite Mission Church Belize 156 - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " BELIZE... Blue Creek Evangelical Mennonite Mission Church... Members: 156; Congregations: 1 [This is listed as a distinct org. from Kleinegemeinde zu Blue Creek]
Bobo Burkina Faso - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Boda Indonesia: Lombok - - - - 1965 *LINK* Cederroth, Sven. "From Ancestor Worship to Monotheism: Politics of Religion in Lombok " in Temenos 32 (1996), 7-36. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999). "In northern Lombok, the area where, heedless of all warnings, I decided to do my fieldwork, almost the entire indigenous Sasak population had been adherents of wetu telu in 1965. However, among the indigenous population there were also some Boda settlements, entirely non-islamized Sasak. "
Boda Indonesia: Lombok 5,500 - - - 1968 *LINK* Cederroth, Sven. "From Ancestor Worship to Monotheism: Politics of Religion in Lombok " in Temenos 32 (1996), 7-36. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999). "Similar events took place among the Bentek Boda themselves. The Boda of northwestern Lombok, some 5,500 in all, had managed to pass comparatively unscathed through the turbulent years when the above events took place. "
Boda Indonesia: Lombok - - - - 1996 *LINK* Cederroth, Sven. "From Ancestor Worship to Monotheism: Politics of Religion in Lombok " in Temenos 32 (1996), 7-36. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999). "The island of Lombok is the home of the Sasak people, most of whom are now orthodox Muslims and as such adherents of the waktu lima sect. However, even today some of the Sasak are still counted as adherents of the wetu telu. There are also some smaller groups of entirely non-Islamized pagan Sasak, known as Boda, as well as a Hindu Balinese minority. "
Body of Christ movement world 30,000 - 300
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Latter Rain Pentecostals; pg. 282. "Body of Christ movement
% Foundational Teachings
Box 6598
Silver Spring, MD 20906 [H.Q.]

Along with the neo-Penteocstal movement of the 1960s, there developed what can be termed the Body of Christ movement, focused in the ministry of Charles P. Schmitt and Dorothy E. Schmitt of the Fellowship of Christian Believers in Grand Rapids, Minnesota... The Body of Christ Movement originated in Grand Rapids, Minnesota. Fellowship Press was established and it has issued numerous pamphlets... In the early 1980s, the Schmitts moved their headquarters to the Washington, D.C., area where a strong following developed... Membership: In 1988 there were several hundred congregations and tens of thousands of people involved in the movement. "

Boehmenism Germany - - - - 1624 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 114. "Boehme, Jakob (1575-1624). German lay theologian and mystic. A showemaker in Gorlitz, Silesia, he described his visions I the book Auroroa (1612). He was denounced by Lutheran clergy but his many theosophical writings found a wide readership, and deeply influenced the Romantics and philosophers from Schelling to Heidegger. "
Boehmenism United Kingdom: England - 0.00% - - 1710 Deghaye, Pierre. "Jacob Boehme and His Followers " in Modern Esoteric Spirituality (vol. 21 of "World Spirituality: An Encyclopedic History of the Religious Quest "), edited by Antoine Faivre and Jacob Needleman. New York, NY: Crossroad (1992); pg. 244. "After 1710, organized Boehmenism no longer existed in England. "
Boehmenism world - - - 4
countries
1704 Deghaye, Pierre. "Jacob Boehme and His Followers " in Modern Esoteric Spirituality (vol. 21 of "World Spirituality: An Encyclopedic History of the Religious Quest "), edited by Antoine Faivre and Jacob Needleman. New York, NY: Crossroad (1992); pg. 242-243. Pg. 242: "Organized Boehmenism is tied to... John Pordage (1608-1681). It was around Pordage & his wife that the enthusiasts gathered. They called themselves 'behemists.' Thus a sect was born... through the inspiration of Boehme... "; pg. 243: "The small brotherhood of which Pordage was the head expanded to become the Philadelphian Society. The heart of the society was Jane Lead (1623-1704)... The Philadelphian Society ceased to exist after the death of Lead. The branches of the society established in Germany and Holland did not survive long thereafter. In the eyes of Lead, this brotherhood represented a new church... the English Philadelphians... gave material support to the followers of Boehme who had left Germany for Pennsylvania, where they established a small community [which] proved to be ephemeral... "
Boethusians world - - - - 20 C.E. *LINK* web site: "Karaite Korner "; web page: "History of Karaism " (viewed 14 March 1999). Copyright 1998-1999 by Nehemia Gordon and Devorah Gordon. "The Second Temple period saw the rise of several more sects among them another group which only followed the written Torah called the Boethusians and a sect which added several books to the Bible called the Essenes (a.k.a. the 'Dead Sea Sect'). "
Boethusians world - - - - 200 C.E. *LINK* web site: "Karaite Korner "; web page: "History of Karaism " (viewed 14 March 1999). Copyright 1998-1999 by Nehemia Gordon and Devorah Gordon. "How long these three sects [Sadducees, Essenes, Boethusians] continued to co-exist is unknown. It is often thought that the Essenes and Saducees ceased to exist with the destruction of the Temple in 70 CE. However this seems unlikely as writings of the Essenes appear as late as the 10th century which seems to indicate that they survived well after the destruction of the temple. References to the Sadducees and the Boethusians continue to appear in post-70 CE literature and they also seemed to have survived for some time. "
Bogomilism Bosnia - - - - 1300 C.E. Black, Eric. Bosnia: Fractured Region. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co. (1999); pg. 34. "During the 1200s and 1300s, Bosnia was one of the regions where a variant of Christianity called Bogomilism, which the world has since forgotten, took hold. Bogomils believed in Jesus but questioned the holiness of Mary, rejected the crucifixion, opposed any kind of religious hierarchy, and believed that Satan and God had equal powers. Roman Catholics and Orthodox Christians considered Bogomilsim to be heresy... Hungary led a Catholic holy war in Bosnia to exterminate Bogomilism in the 1200s, but many Bosnians continued this religious practice. "
Bogomilism Bosnia - - - - 1300 C.E. Black, Eric. Bosnia: Fractured Region. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co. (1999); pg. 34. "...1200s and 1300s... The presence of Bogomils in Bosnia, however, is widely debated. Some historians believe the actual number of real Bogomil believers was overstated and that the importance of the Bogomil chapter has been overrated. These historians believe that the Bosnians weren't Bogomils but were merely practicing a form of folk Christianity that the Catholic and Orthodox churches deemed heretical. Others feel that the belifes of the Bogomils were as close to Islam as they were to Catholicism or to Orthodoxy and that this might explain why many Bosnians converted to Islam after the Ottoman Turks introduced the faith. "
Bogomilism Bosnia and Herzegovina - - - - 1000 C.E. Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 72. "Bosnia, like many isolated areas, developed a mixture of religious beliefs and practices that diverged from the mainstream. In the medieval era, Bosnian Christians embraced Bogomilism (an anticlerical, dualistic sect), considered heretical by the Roman Catholic Church. "
Bogomilism Bosnia and Herzegovina - - - - 1150 C.E. Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 369. "In the tenth century, a new religious sect arose in Bulgaria under the leadership of an Orthodox monk called Bogomil. Bogomilism, as it came to be called, spread through various parts of the Balkans and by the twelfth century was well established in Bosnia. The Kulin, the Bosnian leader, converted to Bogomilism and established it firmly throughout Bosnia, where it came to be known as the 'Bosnian Church.' Bogomilism shared many common characteristics with Catharism or Albigensianism--in particular a belief in a Manichaean dualism--and was eventually condemned as a heresy by both the Roman Catholic and Orthodox Churches. "
Bogomilism Bosnia and Herzegovina - - - - 1490 C.E. Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 369. "Various attempts were made to stamp out [Bogomilism] beginning in the 13th century, but the church still existed in the late 15th century when this area was overrun and incorporated into the Ottoman Empire. Most of the Bogomil aristocracy allied themselves with the Turks and assisted them in their conquest of the area. They then converted to Islam, impelled apparently by their hatred of the Roman Catholic Hungarians who had waged religious war against them for the previous two centuries. Their descendants are the modern Bosnian Moslems now fighting for their existence against efforts by Serbia and Serbs in Bosnia to wipe them out through a prcoess of ethnic cleansing. "
Bogomilism Bulgaria - - - - 940 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 3). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 303. "The Bogomils were a religious sect founded in Bulgaria in the 10th century, which during the Middle Ages won many followers in the southern Balkans and Asia minor, and influenced later religious movements in western Europe... According to the most likely account, Bogomilism was founded by a Bulgarian village priest named Bogomil, who preached about the year 940. "
Bogomilism Europe - - - - 1050 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 27. "Franjo Racki... In a sequence of articles published in 1869-70, he gathered together the available evidence and attempted to prove that the Bosnian Church was an offshoot of the Bogomils. This was a Bulgarian heretical movement, founded in the tenth century by a priest called 'Bogumil', which spread in subsequent centuries into Constantinople and other areas of the Balkans, including Macedonia and parts of Serbia. "
Bogomilism Europe - - - - 1400 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 326. "The Bogomils. Named either after the Slavic for 'beloved of God' or after a heretic named Bogomile, this Balkan sect c. 1000-1400 denied that Christ had founded an organized church. Adherents thus had not use for churches or ordained priests; they also rejected most of the Old Testament and church doctrine on saints, the virgin birth, all images, and infant baptism, among other things. Originally centered in Bulgaria, the Bogomil sect believed that God the Father had two sons: first came Satanael (Satan), who was thrown out of heaven for his sin of pride, and then Jesus Christ (the Logos). Satanael created humanity, but God gave them their souls; He then created Jesus, who overcame his evil brother, Satanael. "
Bogomilism world - - - - 1050 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 3). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 304. "In the 11th century Bogomilism spread to Asia Minor, and the sect had adherents in Constantinople itself, even among the ranks of the aristocracy. The Byzantine Bogomils developed an extremely peculiar doctrine of the Trinity, and taught that Christ entered the Virgin Mary's body through her right ear, and issued forth again as a phantom... the Bogomils became very numerous after the 10th century... Bogomilism disappeared from history when Bulgaria was conquered by the Turks at the end of the 14th century, but the movement had begun to decline from the beginning of the century. "
Bohoras India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 114. "Bohoras [or] Bohras or Buhrah. Muslim community in western India whose members, for the most part belong to the Isma'iliyya sect of Shi'ism and recognize al-Must'ali (1094-1101) as Imam and successor to his father al-Mustansir, the Fatmid, against the claims of his brother Nizar. Nizar's adherents are represented in India by the Khojas. The name implies the Hindu origin of the earliest converts to this sect. There are also Sunni and even Hindu Bohoras. "
Bokora Uganda - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Bold Bible Living British Columbia 700 - 2
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 283. "There are two congregations with an approximate membership of 100, both in British Columbia. "


Bold Bible Living, continued

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