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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Beachy Amish Mennonite Churches, world

Beachy Amish Mennonite Churches, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Beachy Amish Mennonite Churches world 5,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 28. "About every generation there is a schism from the Old Order Amish, as voices are raised for liberalization. The most important division is the Beachy Amish (1927), with 5,000 members. Amish leaving individually tend to join one of the Mennonite churches. "
Beachy Amish Mennonite Churches world 5,862 - 79
units
- 1985 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Amish; pg. 311. "Beachy Amish Mennonite Churches... Plain City, OH [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1985 the Beachy Amish reported 5,862 membres, 79 congregations, and 278 ministers. "
Beachy Amish Mennonite Churches world 6,530 - 101
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 150. "Today there are 101 congregations and 6,530 members. "
Beachy Amish Mennonite Churches world 7,228 - 112
units
- 1991 Nolt, Steven M. A History of the Amish, Good Books: Intercourse, PA (1992). [Orig. source: Mennonite Yearbook 1972, Mennonite Yearbook 1992]; pg. 281. Table: "The Beachy Amish, Congregations and Membership, 1971 and 1991 "
Beachy Amish Mennonite Churches world 7,200 - 112
units
- 1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 59. "Today 87 churches in the United States, 8 in Canada, and 17 in other countries go by that name. Total membership is 7,200, according to the 1992 Mennonite Yearbook. "
Beachy Amish Mennonite Churches world 6,872 - 99
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). -
Beachy Amish Mennonite Churches world 8,399 - 138
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "USA/Canada: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " "Beachy Amish Mennonite Fellowship; Members: Canada - 476; USA - 7,255; Total - 8,399; Congregations: Canada - 9; USA - 97; Total - 138; ** Membership and congregation totals include members and congregations in other countries.** "
Bear Tribe USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 71. "There are several groups which are based on Native American traditions which are considered to be on the periphery of Paganism. The Bear Tribe in Washington publishes Wildfire and sponsors Medicine Wheel Gatherings, trainings, apprenticeships, and vision quests. "
Bear Tribe USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 74. "The Bear Tribe, P.O. Box 9167, Spokane, WA 99209. Sponsors Medicine Wheel gatherings, training, apprenticeship, and vision quests; publishes Wildfire... "
Bedouin Arabia 300,000 1.00% - - 1985 Time-Life Books. Arabian Peninsula (series: Library of Nations). Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1985); pg. 61-62. "By strict definition, a Bedouin is a desert nomad who speaks Arabic, lives in a tent, raises camels and belongs to a tribe. No one knows how many of the Bedouin fit that definition today. estimates range between 200,000 and 300,000, or less than 1 per cent of the population. Exact figures are hard to come by, partly because tribal grazing areas spill casually across national boundaries, and partly because today's Bedouin are increasingly giving up camel herding to use the car and truck for transportation in the desert. They are also giving up their portable tents for permanent dwellings of sun-dried clay or even cement. "
Bedouin Egypt 50,000 - - - 1977 Perl, Lila. Egypt, Rebirth on the Nile. New York: William Morrow and Company (1977); pg. 150. "Egypt's Bedouins are nowadays believed to number fewer than 50,000. "
Bedouin Iraq - - - - 1990 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Iraq ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1990); pg. 40-41. "Two minority groups--the Madan and the Bedouin--stand out among Iraq's Arabs... [Bedouin] These desert wanderers travel through the hot zones of Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Jordan on a seasonal search for water and grass for livestock. Iraq and Saudi Arabia each gave up a piece of their desert territory to form a neutral zone to ease the movements of the Bedouin between the two countries. In recent years, however, many Bedouin have adopted more settled ways of life. "
Bedouin Israel 30,000 - - - 1972 Hoffman, Gail. The Land and People of Israel (series: Portaits of the Nations Series). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (1972, revised edition); pg. 61-62. "Among the thirty thousand Beduin in Israel, life has undergone a most radical change. "
Bedouin Israel - - - - 1987 Taitz, Emily & Sondra Henry. Israel: A Sacred Land (series: Discovering Our Heritage). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Dillon Press (1987); pg. 17-18. "This ancient way of living can still be seen in Israel today among a group called the Bedouins. Like their ancestors, some Bedouin Arabs still live in black goatskin tents with no running water or electricity. They travel over the deserts searching for grass and water for their goats and sheeps. The Israeli government tried to help the Bedouins to improve their lives by giving them new apartments with modern kitchens and bathrooms. The apartment houses were built in a city called Beersheeba, in the middle of the Negev Desert, close to where the Bedouins live. Some of these wandering people learned to live in the city and accepted this new way of life. A few even travel north to the big cities of Jerusalem or Tel Aviv... Others were not happy with modern life and returned to the desert and their ancient way of living. "
Bedouin Israel 66,000 1.50% - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Israel ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 38, 40-41. "Israel's 4.4 million people... "; Pg. 40: "The Arab population within the 1948 boundaries of Israel constitutes about 15% of the total population. "; Pg. 41: "Nearly 10 percent of the Arabs in Israel are Bedouin, most of whom live in the Negev Desert. Traditionally, the Bedouin have led a nomadic lifestyle, but they are slowly becoming settled in permanent communities as agriculture extends farther into the desert region. "
Bedouin Jordan - - - - 1985 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Jordan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 41. "Although the Bedouin actually represent only a small percentage of the Jordanian population, they have enjoyed a strong political and cultural role in Jordan. They are loyal to King Hussein and make up a high percentage of the Jordanian army. Perhaps because Bedouin are sometimes viewed as the original Arabs, East Bank Jordanians uphold the Bedouin lifestyle as a model for all Jordanians to follow. The Bedouin live primarily in the eastern two-thirds of Jordan, a desert region that stretches from Jordan's Syrian and Iraqi frontiers in the north to its Suadi Arabian borders in the south. They may also be found in the western portion--including Amman--at some times of the year. "
Bedouin Jordan - 7.00% - - 1988 Whitehead, Susan. Jordan. New Haven, CT: Chelsea House Publishers (1988); pg. 40-41. "The nomadic tribes who wandered over the desert and established tribal territories in the region are the ancestors of the modern Bedouin who now make up seven per cent of the kingdom's population... Today, some Bedouin still follow the traditional way of life. They live with few tools and no furniture, carrying their houses on the backs of their camels when the desert's scanty pasture is exhausted and new grazing has to be found. "
Bedouin Jordan 308,000 7.00% - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999); pg. 60. Pg. 60: "Jordan's population of 4.4 million (not including the West Bank)... Of all the people in the Middle East, none has a reputation as exalted as the Bedu, or Bedouin. Largely a nomadic people, they cling to ancient ways, living by fabled codes of hospitality and kinship. Totalling about seven per cent of the population, they wander in Jordan's desserts, and those of Saudi Arabia, Syria and Iraq. "
Bedouin Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 274. "Bedouin: Mainly Arab nomads, who traditionally roamed around the desert raising sheep, goats and camels. In recent decades many have become more permanently settled. "
Bedouin Qatar - - - - 1997 Augustin, Byron & Rebecca A. Augustin. Qatar (series: Enchantment of the World). New York: Children's Press (1997); pg. 62. "The Bedouin seldom visit south Qatar today. Like the cowboys of the Old West, they are more legend than reality. However, their tradition of hospitality, bravery, respect and patience are woven into Qatari society. If they do go to the desert for vacation and week-end camping, they no longer travel by camel, the famed 'ship of the desert.' Instead, four-wheel-drive Land Rovers, Nissans, and Toyotas are the preferred mode of transportation. The 'romantic' nomadic life is now the subject of television programs from Doha and the dreams of the youthful generation. The U.S. has 'urban cowboys.' Qatar has 'urban Bedouin.' "
Bedouin Saudi Arabia - - - - 1986 McCarthy, Kevin. Saudi Arabia: A Desert Kingdom (series: Discovering Our Heritage). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Dillon Press, Inc. (1986); pg. 27-28. "Most Saudis live in cities or towns... But some Saudis, a group of wandering herdsmen called the bedouin, have changed their way of life very little in the last thousand years. Those Bedouins who still live in the desert ride their horses and camels while they herd their sheep and other animals from place to place... "
Bedouin world - - - 6
countries
1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 90. "A nomadic people, the Bedouin inhabit the desert area of north and central Saudi Arabia, pat of Yemen, southwestern Iraq, and a crescent of wasteland from southern Israel, through Jordan, to eastern Syria. But even these accomplished desert dwellers have not been able to sustain themselves in the waterless wastes of the Empty Quarter, the great Arabian desert... Their religion is Islam. "
Bedouin world 5,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 105-106. "Bedu: Alternate Names: Bedouin; Location: Deserts of Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Kuwait, Yemen, Oman, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, & Egypt; Population: 4 - 5 million; Religion: Islam "; "Generally speaking, a Bedu is an Arab tho lives in one of the desert areas of the Middle East and raises camels, sheep, or goats... "; "Probably no more than 10% of all Bedu still live in a purely traditional way... Life for the other 90% of the Bedu is similar to that of other urbanized Arab peoples. "; Pg. 106: "Bedu are now Muslim. At one time there were Jewish & Christian tribes, but none of them survive today. For the most part, Bedu do not follow Islam duties & rules strictly. Given the Bedu's desert environment and demanding existence, many Islamic rituals are difficult to practice in the same manner as elsewhere... "
Bedouin - Anizah - Ruala Saudi Arabia - - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 91. "Of the true nomads, one of the leading tribes is the Anizah. The Ruala Bedouin, a division of the Anizah, are located in the north central section of Saudi Arabia. They are one of the better studied Bedouin groups and exemplify the camel nomads. "
Bedouin - Arabdar Saudi Arabia - - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 90-91. "In Saudi Arabia, the Bedouin are divided into four classifications... Next [2nd] on the social scale are the Aradbar. They live in towns during part of the year and are not regarded as real nomads. "
Bedouin - Badia Saudi Arabia - - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 90. "In Saudi Arabia, the Bedouin are divided into four classifications. First in importance are the Badia, who live in black tents made of animal hair. Strictly camel breeders, they spend about nine months of the year in the desert. It is only during the driest months that they move their herds from the scorched backland to the slightly greener fringes of the farming areas. They consider other Bedouin inferior, and marriage takes place only within the confines of their social group. "
Bedouin - Hadbar Saudi Arabia - - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 90-91. "In Saudi Arabia, the Bedouin are divided into four classifications... The lowliest [socially] are the Hadbar who supply the true nomads with valuable merchandise and provide much of the town services. They live in mud houses the year round. "
Bedouin - Hukra Saudi Arabia - - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 90-91. "In Saudi Arabia, the Bedouin are divided into four classifications... The Hukra care for the sheep of the more important tribes. They are looked down on by the other Bedouin because sheep do not travel as far as camels, and so the Hukra's nomadic wanderings are limited. "
Beja Ethiopia - - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; "Sudan, Ethiopia "
Beja Ethiopia - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Beja Sudan - - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; "Sudan, Ethiopia "
Beja Sudan - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Bektashis Albania - - - - 1997 Wright, David K. Albania ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997); pg. 99. "In Albania, many people follow a version of Islam not fully in keeping with the more strict methods of worship in the Middle East. Called Bektashism, this version of Islam was founded in Asia Minor in the 1200s and includes elements of ancient pagan religions and christianity. Many Bektashis drink alcohol... Calls to prayer are irregular or nonexistent, women do not wear veils... worshipers are baptized and practice regular confession, and God is seen as a part of nature rather than a supreme being with whom a believer is in contact. Turks tried to stamp out Bektashism in Albania and Communists tried to stamp out all forms of Islam in Albania. Both failed utterly. "
Bektashis USA - - - - 1993 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993); pg. 20. "Albanian Bektashis [a Muslim sect] are dispersed in communities in Connecticut, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Michigan, with a resident leader in the Tekke in Michigan. "
Bektashis world - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Naqshbandi.net "; web page: "A 30-Second Guide to Sufi Orders Found in North America " (viewed 10 Feb. 1999). [Orig. source: GNOSIS Magazine #30 (Winter 1994)] "Bektashi (founder: Haji Bektash Veli [d.1335?]). Found primarily in Turkey and Eastern Europe... There is a primarily Albanian Bektashi tekke (lodge) outside of Detroit. "
Belarusian Autocephalous Orthodox Church Canada - - 1
unit
- 1978 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 72. Melton lists two distinct bodies in North America: "Byelorussian Orthodox Church " & "Byelorussian Autocephalic Orthodox Church in the USA "
Belarusian Autocephalous Orthodox Church USA - - 3
units
- 1978 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 72. Melton lists two distinct bodies in North America: "Byelorussian Orthodox Church " & "Byelorussian Autocephalic Orthodox Church in the USA "
Belarusian Autocephalous Orthodox Church world - - 4
units
2
countries
1978 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 72. Melton lists two distinct bodies in North America: "Byelorussian Orthodox Church " & "Byelorussian Autocephalic Orthodox Church in the USA "
Belarusian Autocephalous Orthodox Church world 4,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* "BELARUSIAN BISHOP FREED FROM PRISON ", ETWN News Brief, 5 November 1998. [Source: CWNews.com/KNS] "Bishop Hushcha, 43, is the leader of the Belarusian Autocephalous Church, a 4,000-strong body that broke away from the Belarusian Exarchate of the Orthodox Church. It has so far failed to gain official registration [in Russia] "
Belarusian Orthodox Belarus 9,060,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; Listed as "Belarussian Orthodox "
Belarusian Orthodox Church Canada - - 1
unit
- 1978 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 73. Melton lists two distinct bodies in North America: "Byelorussian Orthodox Church " & "Byelorussian Autocephalic Orthodox Church in the USA "
Belarusian Orthodox Church USA - - 2
units
- 1978 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 73. Melton lists two distinct bodies in North America: "Byelorussian Orthodox Church " & "Byelorussian Autocephalic Orthodox Church in the USA "
Belarussians Russia: Komi 25,017 2.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Komi " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "Approximately 1,250,8470 [sic: should be approx. 1.25 million] people live in the Republic of Komi... Other groups include Ukrainians (8%), Belarussians (2%) and Tatars (2%). "
Belize Evangelical Mennonite Church Belize 305 - 14
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " BELIZE... Belize Evangelical Mennonite Church... Members: 305; Congregations: 14
Bemba world 150,000 - - 3
countries
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 33, 36. "Bemba: Population: 150,000; Location: Zaire, Zambia, Zimbabwe; Language: Bemba, English "; Pg. 36: "The tradition of men taking more than one wife is dying out, as are many other old customs. Although some religious customs such as the worship of ancestor spirits are still practiced, most of the Bemba today consider themselves Christians... In Zambia, the Bemba society has for the most part become one with the national identity of the country. "
Bemba Zambia 3,060,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 55. "Bemba: Location: Northern Zambia; Population: 3,060,000; Religion: Protestantism; traditional beliefs; Roman Catholicism; African Christianity; Islam " [This is a measure of tribal/ethnic affiliation, NOT a measure of how many practice traditional Bemba religion.]
Bene Israel India 4,000 - - - 1170 C.E. Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990); pg. 73. [In Bombay, India area] 'Bene Israel' Jews. 1,000 in C.E. 1170; 10,000 in 1950. Their first settlement probably dates back to 175 B.C.E... "
Bene Israel India - - - - 1799 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2081. "The Bene Israel appear to have had very few contants with Jews from other communities before the 19th century. In their comparative isolation, they forgot how to read Hebrew, but they remembered the Shema, an important Hebrew prayer, and observed the Sabbath, some of the holy days, some dietary regulations and the practice of circumcision. They adopted a number of religious beliefs and practices from their Hindu neighbours. For example, they did not eat beef, they objected to the re-marriage of widows, and they were assimilated into the caste system. The Bene Israel were known as Saturday Oilmen; a caste of oil pressers who did not work on Saturday. "
Bene Israel India - - - - 1800 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2081. "From the 18th century the Bene Israel migrated from their villages to Bombay where they became a more tightly-nit group, entered a wider range of occupations, and helped by other Jewish groups, strengthened their Judaism. "
Bene Israel India 20,000 - - - 1945 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 194. "The Jews of India are a varied lot, divided into distinct communities. The Bene Israel are only one of these, though by far the largest. When India's Jewish population was at its greatest (during the mid-1940s), Bene Israel made up two-thirds of its approximately thirty thousand Jews. "
Bene Israel India 30,000 - - - 1950 Gilbert, Martin (ed.) The Illustrated Atlas of Jewish Civilization: 4,000 Years of Jewish History. New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1990); pg. 73. [In Bombay, India area] 'Bene Israel' Jews. 1,000 in C.E. 1170; 10,000 in 1950... They are divided into 'black' and 'white' Jews who do not intermarry. "
Bene Israel India - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2081. "...there is some uncertainty over the origin and date of arrival of both the Cochin Jews... and the Bene Israel, who in the past were dispersed in the villages of Konkan but who now live mainly in Bombay. The Bene Israel maintain that they came from Arabia in the first millennium AD. "
Bene Israel India - - 3
units
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 206. "Nine synagogues still function in Bombay, although the two Baghdadi ones have to pay Bene Israel to help form a daily minyan. In Poona, too, two synagogues remain open: one Bene Israel and the other Baghdadi. Bene Israel synagogues survive in Ahmedabad and Delhi, a Baghdadi synagogue in Calcutta, and the oldest of all Indian synagogues in Cochin... "
Bene Israel India: Bombay 2,000 - - - 1925 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 197. "...by the 1920s, some 2,000 Bene Israel were concentrated in Bombay. "
Bene Israel India: Poona - - 1
unit
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 205-206. "In Poona, too, two synagogues remain open: one Bene Israel and the other Baghdadi. "
Bene Israel United Kingdom: London 1,200 - - - 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 205. "Educated Bene Israel sometimes left for countries other than Israel, especially England. Three hundred families are estimated living in the London area. They have little contact with one another, and nothing resembling a Bene Israel community. "
Bene Israel - Gora India - - - - 1800 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2081. "From the 18th century the Bene Israel... They were also divided into two sub-castes: the Gora or White Bene Israel, who claimed they were pure descendants of the first Jewish settles in India, and the lower caste Kalu... "
Bene Israel - Kalu India - - - - 1800 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2081. "From the 18th century the Bene Israel... They were also divided into two sub-castes: the Gora or White Bene Israel... and the lower caste Kalu or Black Bene Israel. "
Bengal Baptist Fellowship India 1,284 - 47
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Bengal Orissa Bihar Baptist Convention India 10,000 - 70
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Bengali Bangladesh 106,000,000 - - - 1991 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 110. "1991 census puts the pop. of Bengal at just over 174 million. The greatest number of Bengalis are found in Bangladesh (106 million), with the remainder living in the Indian state of West Bengal (68 million). " [This is an ethnic/cultural group, NOT a distinct religion.]
Bengali Bangladesh 116,620,000 98.00% - - 1997 Russell, Malcom B. The Middle East and South Asia 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 46. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Bengali Bangladesh 125,015,664 98.00% - - 1998 *LINK* CIA World Factbook 1998 (viewed June 24, 1999) "Population: 127,567,002 (July 1998 est.)... Ethnic groups: Bengali 98%, Biharis 250,000, tribals less than 1 million "
Bengali Bangladesh 122,500,000 98.00% - - 1999 *LINK* "Asia " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Bangladesh is the most densely populated agricultural nation on earth-and one of the poorest. Over 98 percent of its 125 million people are Bangladeshis... Most are Muslim... "
Bengali Bangladesh: Chittagong Hill Tracts - 0.30% - - 1947 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "At the time of the independence of India in 1947, the Bengalis were 0.3% of the population in the Chittagong Hill Tracts. "


Bengali, continued

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