Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Zoroastrian, world

Zoroastrian, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Zoroastrian world 500,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998) [Original sources: J.W. Wright, Editor, The Universal Almanac, 1996] [Bruce Robinson, one of the authors of the Ontario Religious Tolerance web site, double-checked this figure and reported, "The Universal Almanac 1996 says that estimates of the total numbers of Zoroastrians vary from 200 to 500 thousand. " (correspondence, 28 Dec. 98)] Table: "Number of Adherents of World Religions " [Note, after answering questions from Adherents.com about whether the 500,000 figure was a misprint, the authors of ReligiousTolerance.org have modified their table to read ".2 million " (200,000). It was not the intention of Adherents.com to influence data on another web site, but the authors of that site felt the lower figure was more accurate based on available literature.]
Zoroastrian world 100,000 - - - 1997 Ganeri, Anita. Religions Explained: A Beginner's Guide to World Faiths, Henry Hold and Company: Markham, Ontario (1997); pg. 42. "There are about 100,000 Zoroastrians in the world today. Many live in western India and are known as Parsis. "
Zoroastrian world 274,000 0.00% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Zoroastrian world 200,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 627. "Zoroastrianism rose to become the state religion of three great Persian Empires, but today there are less than 200,000 members of the religion spread throughout the world. "
Zoroastrian world 140,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web page: "Frequently asked questions on Zoroastrianism and the Avesta " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999) "Last figure I saw was around 140,000. Largest populations are in India & Iran. J Hinnells' booklet Zoroastrianism and the Parsis (p.8) has 17,000 in Iran and 92,000 in India. North American Zoroastrians: around 5,000. "
Zoroastrian world 125,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "All Faiths Press "; web page: "Zoroastrianism " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999) "125,000, mostly near Bombay, where they are called Parsis. "
Zoroastrian world 130,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Mike Croghan's Religion Page "; web page: "Zoroastrianism " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999; viewed & URL updated 1 July 1999) Table: "Table of Faiths "
Zoroastrian world 200,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "United Church of Canada Inter-Faith Dialogue "; web page: "Zoroastrianism " (viewed 19 Feb. 1999), written by Fritz B. Voll, "Updated: Tue Jun 9 23:39:38 1998 " "The estimated number of Zoroastrians in the world is around 200,000. The homeland of Zoroastrianism is Persia, now Iran. More than half of the Zoroastrians live in India, where they are known as 'Parsees' (people of Persia). "
Zoroastrian world 140,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998); web page: "Zoroastrianism " "Zoroastrianism is a small religion with about 140,000 members. "
Zoroastrian world 100,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Jones, Jennifer. "Non-LDS students say they find BYU appealing " in "NewsNet@BYU " (online news, viewed 9 Feb. 1999); "This story was posted on Friday, February 5 1999 (c) NewsNet. " "There are only 100,000 Zoroastrians in the world, with only two members in Utah, [Khushchehr] Italia said. "
Zoroastrian - continuous fire temples Tanzania - - 1
unit
- 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 260. "All continuous Zoroastrian fires are in India, Iran, and Pakistan, with the exception of one remaining in Zanzibar. "
Zoroastrian - continuous fire temples world - - - 4
countries
1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 260. "All continuous Zoroastrian fires are in India, Iran, and Pakistan, with the exception of one remaining in Zanzibar. Overseas Zoroastrian communities have generally not been able to afford to maintain fires around the clock. In India, entrance to fire temples is restricted to Parsis. "
Zulu South Africa 5,000,000 15.07% - - 1986 Stein, R. Conrad. South Africa (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1986); pg. 24, 26. Pg. 24: "estimated 1986 population of South Africa stood at 33,185,000. "; Pg. 26: "There are more than five million Zulus... "
Zulu South Africa 2,500,000 - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 168, 174. "Zulu: Population: 2,500,000; Location: South Africa; Language: Zulu, Afrikaans, English; Pg. 181: "Under the influence of British missionaries, many Zulu converted to Christianity, but many still practice their native religion. In Zulu religious life, great emphasis is placed on ancestor spirits... "
Zulu South Africa 9,228,800 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 486. "Zulu: Location: KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa Population: 9,228,800 Zulu-speakers; Language: IsiZulu; Zulu; English; Religion: Mixture of traditional beliefs and Christianity "; "Under colonialism, many Zulu converted to Christianity. Although there are a large number of Christian converts, ancestral beliefs have far from disappeared. Instead, there has been a mixture of traditional beliefs and Christianity. This kind of religion is very common, especially among urbanites. Besides these two types of religion, there is a third type: fervent Christians who view ancestral belief as outdated and sinful. "
Zulu South Africa - blacks - 25.00% - - 1980 Mack, John. Zulus. Morristown, NJ: Silver Burdett Co. (1980); pg. 4. "Today, the Zulu are still a powerful nation of four million people, making up about 25% of all the black people in South Africa. "
Zulu world 4,000,000 - - - 1980 Mack, John. Zulus. Morristown, NJ: Silver Burdett Co. (1980); pg. 4. "Today, the Zulu are still a powerful nation of four million people, making up about 25% of all the black people in South Africa. "
Zuni North America 2,500 - - - 1680 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 55. "The Zuni numbered about 2,500 in 1680. "
Zuni North America 7,700 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 55. "The Zuni numbered about 2,500 in 1680. Today their population is more than 7,700. "
Zuni North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 2,500 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); a.k.a. "Zuņi "
Zuni USA - Southwest - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 17). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2300. "Once there were hundreds of villages, now there are only 25 (in north-west New Mexico and north-east Arizona). The villages cluster together in accordance with tribal links--for there are five separate tribes of Pueblo Indians: Hopi, Zuni, Keres, Tiwa and Tewa. "
Zuni world 2,500 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); a.k.a. "Zuņi "
Zuni world 5,000 - - - 1993 Carmody, Denise Lardner & John Tully Carmody, Native American Religion: An Introduction, Paulist Press: New York, NY (1993); pg. 263. "In modern times... perhaps 5,000 "; NOTE: adherent figure is really an estimate of tribe pop., regardless of which religion individuals practice. In earlier periods, all tribe practiced tribal religion, but not necessarily true today.
Zurvanism world 0 - - - 1000 C.E. Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 66. "in the sixth and fifth centuries BCE... evolved the only considerable Zoroastrian heresy, Zurvanism. This was a monism (based on a re-interpretation of a Gathic verse) which postulated a common father for Ahura Mazda and Angra Mainyu, namely the remote god Zurvan, 'Time'. Zurvanism developed its own mythos and gained considerable support and influence, only to disappear entirely after the tenth century CE. "
Zurvanism world - - - - 1999 Klein, Rick. "From A to Zurvanism " in Dallas Morning News, 28 Aug. 1999; pg. 1G. "His site [Adherents.com] includes a huge spread of data, with numbers of followers listed by place and religion, from the Aaronic Order to Zurvanism. " [NOTE: This article does not provide any statistical or geographical information, but it is so rare to see Zuranism mentioned in the newspaper that we have included this citation.]
miscellaneous regional info Albania - - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "A minority of people with a Greek decent live in Albania, almost all in the southern part of the country. The relations between Greece and Albania have improved lately and that has had a positive effect on the Greek minority. "
miscellaneous regional info Albania - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 26-27. "By the 19th cen., Islam became the predominant religion in Albania, claiming about 70% of the pop. while some 20% remained Orthodox and 10% Roman Catholic... Communist regime... aggressively atheistic... Following the collapse of the old Communist order, Albania has seen a religious revival of sorts, & some believe that the religions with the most adherents are evangelical Christian denominations, Seventh-day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses & others. The current Albanian government includes Catholic, Muslim, & Orthodox members. "
miscellaneous regional info Bahamas - - - - 1999 Moore, James E. Pelican Guide to the Bahamas. Gretna, Louisiana: Pelican Publishing Co. (1999); pg. 52. "The first Europeans who settled in the Bahamas came seeking religious freedom. While the Anglican Church is the official church of state, there are no religious restrictions of any kind. Most Bahamians are devout, and much of the social life... centers around its churches, including Roman Catholic, Methodist, Baptist, Presbyterian, Christian Science, Pentecostal, Greek Orthodox, Lutheran and Church of God congregations. There are also several Jewish synagogues and a growing Muslim community. On more remote islands, 'Obeah'... is still practiced. "
miscellaneous regional info Bangladesh: Chittagong Hill Tracts 300,000 - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 63. "Few truly primitive, untouched peoples remain in the modern world, but a few such groups do exist in the hilly jungle region that lies between Eastern Pakistan and Burma. This border area, known as the Chittagong Hill Tracts, is five thousand miles of dense tropical forest, periodically deluged by the monsoons and floods, and is inhabited by some 300,000 people belonging to at least twelve different groups. Some of the groups are comparatively civilized and follow the Buddhist or Hindu faiths. The more primitive groups are restricted to the less accessible Bandarban forest area... "
miscellaneous regional info Barbados - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 76-77. "Religion plays an important role in the lives of Barbadians... The main religion is Christianity. The Anglican church has the most members, a legacy from the days of British rule. Other Christian denominations include Roman Catholic, Methodist, and Jehovah's Witness. Altogether, over 140 different sects and denominations are represented among the island's population. Other religious groups include Hindu, Muslim, and Baha'i. A small Jewish community descended from Sephardic Jews... Rastafarianism, which originated in Jamaica... has been accepted by Bajan society... Apostolic Spiritual Baptists... the island's only indigenous religion. "
miscellaneous regional info Belgium - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 157-158. "Flemings... Location: Belgium (northern region, called Flanders); Population: 5 million "; "The Flemings (or Flemish) are Belgium's ethnic majority... The vast majority of Flemish are Catholics. While virtually all are baptized and receive a Catholic education, many do not actively practice their religion, and some are even nonbelievers who remain nominally Catholic in order to avoid being cut off from the many social services administered through the Church. Flanders also has a Protestant minority that includes Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormons, and other denominations. There are also Jewish and Muslim communities among the Flemish. "
miscellaneous regional info Belgium: Wallonia - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 398-399. "Location: Belgium (southern region, called Wallonia); Population: 3.2 million [Walloons, not Belgium in general] "; "While Catholicism is the traditional religion of Wallonia, as it is throughout Belgium, the Walloons are generally less religious than the Flemings to ther north, a difference that hs become even more pronounced in recent years, with parish churches closing due to lack of attendance. Even the elderly who keep statues of the Virgin Mary in their windows often are not regular churchgoers. However, southern Europeans who have emigrated to the region maintain stronger religious ties than do native Walloons. Immigrants from Turkey and North Africa make up a growing Islamic community that is beginning to call for public recognition. Other religious minorities include Protestants, Jews, Russian Orthodox, and Greek Orthodox. "
miscellaneous regional info Belize - - - - 1993 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 80. "In 1993, 62% of the Belizean people were Roman Catholic, while 30% belonged to various Protestant denominations, including the Anglicans (12%) and Methodists (6%). Evangelical groups like Pentecostals, Jehovah's Witnesses, and Seventh-Day Adventists have been gaining on the mainstream Protestant denominations. Other religious groups include Mennonites, Mormons, and Baha'is. "
miscellaneous regional info Bolivia - - - - 1989 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies In 1980s Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, Seventh-Day Adventists, and various Pentecostal denominations gained increasing adherents. Other denominations included Mennonites and Bahai faith and small Jewish community.
miscellaneous regional info Bolivia - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 84. "Most Bolivians are Roman Catholic. However, among the Aymara- and Quechua-speaking Amerindian groups, certain beliefs and rituals remain that stem from local religions which pre-date the Spanish conquest. The respect for nature is embodied in the belief in Mother Earth, known as Pachamama. "
miscellaneous regional info Bosnia - - - - 1850 Black, Eric. Bosnia: Fractured Region. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co. (1999); pg. 36. "During Ottoman rule, most Bosnians identified themselves by their religious group--Muslim, Orthodox Christian, or Roman Catholic. Over time, these religious affiliations developed into cultural identities, wich each group defining itself by its religious and cultural practices. Despite these differences, each group considered itself Bosnian. It was not until the development of Serbian and Croatian nationalism in the 1800s that this changed. Once Serbian and croatian nationalists began to connect nationality with religion, Orthodox Christians in Bosnia began to identify themselves as Serbs, while Bosnian Catholics came to view themselves as Croats. During the decades of Austro-Hungarian rule in Bosnia, Serbian and Croatian nationalists worked to strengthen these national connections. "
miscellaneous regional info Bosnia - - - - 1991 Black, Eric. Bosnia: Fractured Region. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co. (1999); pg. 14. "In the country's last census--in 1991--44 percent of Bosnia's 4.5 million people identified themselves as Muslims, 31 percent as Serbs, and 17 percent as Croats. Bosnia also includes a small number of Jews, Roma... and Albanians... Bosnian Serbs are mostly followers of the Serbian Orthodox Church, Bosnian Croats are mostly Roman Catholics... "
miscellaneous regional info Bulgaria - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 80. "The Bulgarians are not known for being a strongly religious people. The major organized religion in Bulgaria is Eastern Orthodox Christianity, which over 85% of Bulgarians list as their religion, although many have a limited familiarity with its teachings. Their religious observance is mostly a matter of tradition rather than deeply held personal beliefs. Approximately 13% of Bulgarians are Muslim, and there are smaller Protestant and Catholic minorities. "
miscellaneous regional info Cameroon - - - - 1998 *LINK* personal web page: "Welcome to Cameroon " Most Cameroonians are Christian or Muslim... My own unscientific impression is that Cameroon has a higher fraction of practicing (not just professing) Christians than does the US.
miscellaneous regional info Central African Republic - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 81-82. "Location: Central African Republic; Population: 3.2 million "; "Most Central Africans profess to being Christian, with 35% of the population being Protestant and 18% being Catholic. The remainder are either Muslim, Baha'i, or Jehovah's Witness. Despite the popularity of western religionin the CAR, many Central Africans still adhere to he traditional religion of ancestor worship, or animism. "
miscellaneous regional info China - - - - 1970 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 191-192. "the People's Republic of China was established along Communist lines in 1949. The Marxist government discouraged religion but did not ban it outright; that prohibition occurred during the disastrous period of the Great Cultural Revolution, 1966-78. Then, many Buddhist and Taoist temples and shrines were closed or destroyed and the clergy forced into labor. The same thing happened to the Catholic, Protestant, and Islamic clergy and places of worship that had been established in China. "
miscellaneous regional info China - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 742. "Taoism, religious.One of the four major religious traditions in China (with Confucianism, Buddhism and Chinese Popular Religion)... "
miscellaneous regional info China - - - - 1982 McLenighan, Valjean. China (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1984); pg. 129. "Religion: After the Communist revolution, religious practice was discouraged & most churches & other places of worship were closed. By the early 1980s, however, the authorities were more lenient, allowing Buddhists, Muslims, Lama Buddhists, & Christians (who probably exceed the 1949 estimate of 3 to 4 million) to conduct religious services. The authorities also were permitting the training of clergymen & publication of Bibles, hymnals, & other religious works. The estimate of the number of Muslims in China is anywhere from 7 to 10 million. The constitution guarantees religious freedom, but it also protects the 'freedom not to believe' and to propagate atheism. "
miscellaneous regional info China - - - - 1984 Time-Life BooksChina (series: Library of Nations). Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1984); pg. 14. "Although China's present government is atheist, its constitution guarantees religious freedom. By and large the promise is kept. Three world religions--Buddhism, Islam, and Roman Catholic and Protestant Christianity--survive along with folk beliefs and the ancient philosophies of Confucianism and Daosim. "
miscellaneous regional info China - - - - 1997 Leibo, Steven A. East, Southeast Asia, and the Western Pacific 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 13. "Principal Religions: Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Islam and Christianity, all of which have been intermixed to one degree or another. They have been severely opposed and suppressed by the communist government, but in recent years the anti-religious pressures have lessened and they are enjoying a revival. "
miscellaneous regional info China - - - - 2003 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "As a result of periodic repression of religion by various dictators (Guest, 2003), survey data of religious belief in the most populous country in the world - China - is extremely unreliable (Demerath, 2001:154). Only recently has sound scholarship begun to emerge, and even that is of limited scope (Yang, 2004). " [Sources: Guest, Kenneth. 2003. God in Chinatown. New York, NY: New York University Press; Yang, Fenggang. 2004. "Between Secularist Ideology and Desecularizing Reality: The Birth and Growth of Religious Research in Communist China. " Sociology of Religion 65(20):101-119.]
miscellaneous regional info Czech Republic - - - - 1987 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Total pop. (1987) 15.6 million. Principal denominations Roman Catholic Church, Czechoslovak National Church, Slovak Evangelical Church, Evangelical Church of Czech Brethren, and Uniate Church.
miscellaneous regional info Czechoslovakia - - - - 1988 Nebor, Leos; MaryLee Knowlton, et al. Czechoslovakia (series: Children of the World). Milwaukee: Gareth Stevens Publishing (1988); pg. 50. "Communism and religion don't always get along very well. That is true in this country, where priests, ministers, and rabbis are paid by the government. Religious leaders who try to find new members or make a big public display of their religion migh find their pay, home, or even freedom taken away. Three of every four Czechs who go to school are Roman Catholic. There is a Catholic church in every city. There are some Protestants, mostly Methodist, Baptist, and Unitarian. Only older people go to church on Sunday in the big cities. However, religion is still important to many rural residents. They wear colorful folk outfits and are sometimes members of Greek Orthodox or Catholic churches. Easter and Christmas are public holidays. But religion is not an important part of life in modern Czechoslovakia. "
miscellaneous regional info Ecuador - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 168. "Ecuador is predominantly a Roman Catholic country... In the late 1960s, the Church in Ecuador and elsewhere in Latin America began to defend the poor and argue for social change. The 'theology of liberation,' as it was called, found religious justification for social change and political reform... The influence of the Roman Catholic Church in rural society seems to be in decline. In the 1980s, Pentecostal and Protestant churches have begun to expand their influence in the countryside. "
miscellaneous regional info Egypt: Alexandria - - - - -332 B.C.E. Osborne, Richard. Philosophy for Beginners. New York, NY: Writers and Readers Publishing (1992); pg. 21. "Alexandria: Founded by Alexander in 332 BC on a natural harbour at one of the mouths of the Nile, it soon flourished under the enlightened rule of the Macedonian Ptolemy I into the greatest Mediterranean sea-port. The city was intensely cosmopolitan, bringing together Egyptians, the Jews of the Diaspora, and other races besides Greeks. For 600 years, while Alexander's ephemeral Hellenic empire split and faltered, and imperial Rome rose and fell, Alexandria was the last great light of antiquity. "
miscellaneous regional info Equatorial Guinea - - - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 72. "Principal Religions: Most people are nominally Roman Catholic; traditional tribal beliefs are intermingled with their Christian faith. "
miscellaneous regional info Eritrea - - - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Muslim, Coptic Christian, Roman Catholic, Protestant; Total Population: 3,589,687. (Former name of country: Eritrea Autonomous Region in Ethiopia)
miscellaneous regional info Estonia - - - - 1992 Geography Department (Mary M. Rodgers, series editor). Estonia (series: Then and Now). Minneapolis, Minn.: Lerner Publications Co. (1992); pg. 25. "Most Estonians follow the Lutheran faith, which German rulers introduced in the 1500s. Russian immigrants brought in the Russian Orthodox form of Christianity. Soviet authorities restricted both religions, but believers continued to participate in services whenever possible. Songfests and holiday celebrations remained popular despite the ban on religious practices. These gatherings strengthened Estonia's national identity throughout the decades of Soviet occupation. "
miscellaneous regional info Estonia - - - - 1998 Ruggiero, Adriane. The Baltic Countries: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. Parsippany, New Jersey: Dillon Press (1998); pg. 8. "Major Religions: Under Soviet rule the practice of religion was suppressed. With independence, Estonians became free to worship as they pleased. There are Lutherna churches in Estonia as well as Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Jewish congregations. "
miscellaneous regional info Ethiopia - - - - 1986 Kleeberg, Irene Cumming. Ethiopia. New York: Franklin Watts (1986); pg. 47. "The official religion of Ethiopia for centuries was Coptic Christianity. This church became very wealthy over the years and this wealth may have angered some people and contributed to the coups d'etat against the government. Although Coptic Christianity was the official religion, there are probably more Moslems than Christians in the country. Most people in North Africa are Moslems. "; Pg. 49: "A large number of Ethiopians have animistic beliefs... "
miscellaneous regional info Ethiopia - - - - 1986 Lye, Keith. Take a Trip to Ethiopia. London, UK: Franklin Watts (1986); pg. 12-13. "Axum's King Ezana became a Christian in the fourth century AD and the Ethiopian Orthodox Church has survived to this day. But today more Ethiopians are Muslims and Christians... Eleven Christian churches, carved by hand out of the rock at Lalibela, in northern Ethiopia in the 12th and 13th centuries, now attract many pilgrims and tourists... "; Pg. 18: "Harar is an ancient city in eastern Ethiopia. Most of its people are Muslims... "
miscellaneous regional info Ethiopia - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 165. "Religious belief and ritual vary with each culture existing within the boundaries of Ethiopia. With over 80 languages spoken, one can find over 80 cultures and over 80 religions. Yet one finds commonalities and overlaps in religious belief and ritual. Therefore, we can generalize and say that there are three major religions practiced by Ethiopian populations today: Coptic Monophysite Christianity, Islam, and indigenous (or what some people used to call pagan) religion. "
miscellaneous regional info Fiji - - - - 1998 *LINK* tourism web site: "First Steps in the Fiji Islands " There is a great diversity of religions in Fiji. The Methodist and Catholic churches have strong followings whilst Hinduism, Islam and Buddhism are also very well represented.
miscellaneous regional info Finland - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 153-154. "Location: Finland; Population: 5 million "; "About 90% of the Finnish population belongs to the state-supported Lutheran Church. While rites of baptism, confirmation, marriage, and funerals are still important for most Finns, it is estimated that as few as 2% attend church regularly. An estimated 1% of Finns belong to the Orthodox Church, and smaller numbers adhere to a variety of faiths including Jehovah's Witnesses, Adventists, Roman Catholics, Mormons, Baptists, and Jews. There is also a civil register of individuals not affiliated with any church. "
miscellaneous regional info French Antilles - - - - 1990 Gravette, A. Gerald. The French Antilles. New York: Hippocrene Books (1990); pg. 31. "Although the islands are predominantly Roman Catholic, Methodist and Evangelical, Hindu, Jewish and places of worship of several other denominations may also be found in the major towns. "
miscellaneous regional info Georgia (country) - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 170, 172-173. "Location: Georgia [Europe]; Population: 5-5.4 million; Religion: Georgian Orthodoxy "; Pg. 172: "The state's multiethnicity is reflected by its multiplicity of religions. The religion of most Georgians is Georgian Orthodoxy... There are also a small number of Georgian Catholics and larger numbers of Georgian Muslims in Achara in southwest Georgia and along the state's southern periphery. The Ossetians and Abkhazians are mostly Eastern Orthodox, the Azeris, Assyrians, and Kurds are mostly Muslim; and the Armenians, Greeks, and Russians are Gregorian, Greek Orthdox, and Russian Orthodox, respectively. Georgia is noted for its religious tolerance, and the capital of Tbilisi has many synagogues, churches of different denominations, and at least one mosque. "
miscellaneous regional info Ghana - - - - 1987 Hintz, Martin. Ghana (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1987); pg. 85. "Ghanaians are very religious. They accept many different faiths. Many of the people still believe in their traditional gods and spirits... Among the Ghanaians there is a mixture of Christians and Muslims. On the whole, different religious groups exist peacefully side by side. For instance, a fetish [traditional religious] priest might support the construction of a new Christian school in his village. In a curious blending of traditional and modern ways, many festivals officially end on Sunday with Christian church services. Even within one family, several religions may be practiced. "
miscellaneous regional info Guam - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Lonely Planet "; web page: "Destination - Guam " (viewed 11 April 1999). "The overriding religion of Guam is Christianity, namely Roman Catholicism. Other denominations include Baptists, Seventh-Day Adventists, Latter-Day Saints and Episcopalians. Jehovah's Witnesses, Jews, Buddhists and Muslims can also be found in small numbers. "
miscellaneous regional info Hungary - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 186-187. "Location: Hungary; Population: About 10 million "; "About 65% of Hungarians are Roman Catholic, 20% Reformed Calvinists, and 5% Lutherans, with smaller numbers of Jews, members of the Eastern Orthodox Church, and other Protestant sects. "
miscellaneous regional info India - - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page: "The 'Right' India Strategy? " by Justin D. Long, 1998 (viewed 5 March 1999) "About three-quarters of India's population are Hindus, 10% Muslim, and 6% Christian. Further, many people groups that are small percentage-wise are still large numbers-wise. Any group with just 0.2% of the population equals more than a million people, and Sikhs, Tribals, Buddhists, Jains, the non-religious, Baha'is and atheists all claim at least that many. "


miscellaneous regional info, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus

Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.