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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to yoga - participants, USA

yoga - participants, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Yoga East - full-time world 100 - - - 1985 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 162. "...Satchidananda founded Yoga East. Originally located in Connecticut, it was moved to Buckingham, VA, in 1980s... developed a community of approx. 100 full-time residents and oversaw the buiding of the Light of Truth Universal Shrine (LOTUS). "
Yogacara world - - - - 350 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 817. "Yogacara. A major school of Mahayana Buddhism according to which consciousness alone is real. This doctrine of subjective idealism was expounded upon by Asanga and Vasubandhu in the fourth century A.D. "
Yogacara world - - - - 550 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 151. "From the Mahayana movement three major sectarian traditions emerged. First, the Pure Land sect... Second... the Madhyamika sect, organized (ca. 250 A.D.)... Finally... Yogacara school, organized by the brothers Asanga and Vasubandhu, and offering an innovative theory of consciousness. This school also had much influence on Chinese and Japanese Buddhism, while enjoying a rather short history in its Indian homeland. "
Yogacara world - - - - 550 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 429-430. "Yogachara - Skt., lit. 'application of yoga' (also called the Vijnanavada, lit. 'the School That Teaches Knowing'); school of Mahayana Buddhism founded by Maitreyanatha, Asanga, and Vasubandhu... The Yogachara school reached its zenith in the 6th century. A center of the school was the monastic university Nalanda in northern India... Along with the school of Nalanda existed the school of Valabhi... "
Yogacara world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "YOGACARAS: a school of MAHYNA BUDDHISM that subscribed to the idea that consciousness alone is real while objects of consciousness are not, thus making MEDITATION rather than intellectual analysis the central concern of the movement. "
Yogic Religion world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "YOGIC RELIGION: a term used to refer to those religious TRADITIONS where the practice of YOGA is the central experience and the doctrines associated with it such as KARMA for the basis of BELIEF. Yogic religion is the main rival to ABRAMIC RELIGION. "
Yoido Full Gospel Church Korea, South 5 - - - 1958 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994).; pg. 221. "...Yoido Full Gospel (Pentecostal) Church. As we noted, the Yoido congregation is a megachurch. Its 800,000 membership makes it the largest congregation in the world. With an initial membership of 5 in 1958... "
Yoido Full Gospel Church Korea, South 2,000 - - - 1963 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994).; pg. 222. "In 1963, within 5 years of its founding, the church had 2,000 members. Each became a dedicated messenger and recruiter, bringing others into the ever enlarging fold. "
Yoido Full Gospel Church Korea, South 15,000 - - - 1971 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994).; pg. 222. "By 1971 there were 15,000 members; by 1981 there were 200,000. The congregation now lists over 800,000, most of whom take part in small face-to-face prayer and study groups in addition to the plenary gathering in the church's massive temple. "
Yoido Full Gospel Church Korea, South 800,000 - - - 1994 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994), last page of center photo section. "Dr. David Yonggi Cho... leads the Yoido Full Gospel (Pentecostal) Church in Seoul, Korea. Its 800,000 members make it the largest single Christian congregation anywhere in the world. "
Yoido Full Gospel Church Korea, South 800,000 - - - 1994 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994).; pg. 221. "...Yoido Full Gospel (Pentecostal) Church. As we noted, the Yoido congregation is a megachurch. Its 800,000 membership makes it the largest congregation in the world. "
Yoido Full Gospel Church Korea, South - - - - 1998 Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe. "Religion " in The Future Now: Predicting the 21st Century. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (1998); pg. 53. "In South Korea Dr. Yonggi Cho invites catechumens into his 'Full Gospel' Church with a promise of bounding riches and bouncing bodies... an abominable prosperity-cult... "
Yoido Full Gospel Church world 700,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web page: "The Yoido Full Gospel Church's International Ministries Home Page " (viewed circa Aug. 1998) "It has now peaked-out with over 700,000 members. The church has branched out into Seoul with 12 Regional Chapels, overseas pioneer churches and 877 Missionaries throughout the world. "
Yokut North America 18,000 - - - 1770 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 63. "Yokut... They numbered about 18,000 in 1770 and about 1,000 in 1930. "
Yokut North America 1,000 - - - 1930 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 63. "Yokut... They numbered about 18,000 in 1770 and about 1,000 in 1930. "
Yokut North America - Pacific Coast 18,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Yokut world 18,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Yomei Japan - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "YOMEI SCHOOL: a Japanese school of CONFUCIANISM based on the teachings of WANG YANG-MING pioneered in Japan by Nakae-Tju which promoted devotion to the COSMIC SOUL of which man is a microcosm through SPIRITUAL training. "
Yoruba Africa 5,248,340 - - - 1963 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 464. "Yoruba: Location: West Africa (primarily Nigeria; also Benin and Togo); Population: 5,248,340 "; "The Yoruba people live in West Africa, primarily in the country of Nigeria, but with some scatterred groups in Benin and Togo. According to the 1963 census, out of a total Yoruba population of 5.3 million, 4.1 million lived in the five states of Oyo, Ibadan, Abeokuta, Ijebu, and Ondo. " [NOTE: This statistic is count of tribal/ethnic affiliation -- how many Yorubas there are -- not how many currently practice Yoruba traditional religion.]
Yoruba Benin - - - - 1998 *LINK* CIA World Factbook 1998 (viewed June 24, 1999) "Population: 6,100,799 (July 1998 est.)... Ethnic groups: African 99% (42 ethnic groups, most important being Fon, Adja, Yoruba, Bariba), Europeans 5,500 "
Yoruba Nigeria - - - - 1000 C.E. Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 20. "The Yoruba city-states. The Yoruba appear to have entered southern Nigeria before A.D. 1000. They came with only crude tools, but eventually they evolved an urban social life, a distinctive language, artistic traditions which have gained international fame, monarchical government, and a pattern of religious belief and practice which has become a diasporic tradition with millions of adherents in the Americas. "
Yoruba Nigeria 22,380,000 20.00% - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Nigeria ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 33, 36. Pg. 33: "...Nigeria's 111.9 million people... "; Pg. 36: "Nigeria's second largest ethnic group, the Yoruba, comprises 20% of the population. The Yoruba language is spoken by over 15 million people, primarily in southwestern Nigeria. "
Yoruba Nigeria: Ibadan - 97.70% - - 1963 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 464. "According to the 1963 census, out of a total Yoruba population of 5.3 million, 4.1 million lived in the five states of Oyo, Ibadan, Abeokuta, Ijebu, and Ondo. These states are primarily Yoruba, with the percentages of Yoruba in the population ranging from 89.2% for Ondo state to 97.7% in Ibadan State. " [NOTE: This statistic is count of tribal/ethnic affiliation -- how many Yorubas there are -- not how many currently practice Yoruba traditional religion.]
Yoruba Nigeria: Ondo - 89.20% - - 1963 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 464. "According to the 1963 census, out of a total Yoruba population of 5.3 million, 4.1 million lived in the five states of Oyo, Ibadan, Abeokuta, Ijebu, and Ondo. These states are primarily Yoruba, with the percentages of Yoruba in the population ranging from 89.2% for Ondo state to 97.7% in Ibadan State. " [NOTE: This statistic is count of tribal/ethnic affiliation -- how many Yorubas there are -- not how many currently practice Yoruba traditional religion.]
Yoruba USA - - - - 1600 Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998); pg. 53. "Beginning in the seventeenth century, Yorubas were brough to America as slaves. "
Yoruba world 5,248,340 - - 3
countries
1963 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 464. "Yoruba: Location: West Africa (primarily Nigeria; also Benin and Togo); Population: 5,248,340 "; "The Yoruba people live in West Africa, primarily in the country of Nigeria, but with some scatterred groups in Benin and Togo. According to the 1963 census, out of a total Yoruba population of 5.3 million, 4.1 million lived in the five states of Oyo, Ibadan, Abeokuta, Ijebu, and Ondo. " [NOTE: This statistic is count of tribal/ethnic affiliation -- how many Yorubas there are -- not how many currently practice Yoruba traditional religion.]
Yoruba world 15,000,000 - - - 1980 Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 21. "Yoruba subgroups now extend from southwestern Nigeria through the modern Republic of Benin (formerly Dahomey) and Togo and on into some areas of Ghana (Fage 1969:42; Parrinder 1949). Eades (1980) estimates the total present-day Yoruba population at about fifteen million. "
Yoruba world 17,000,000 - - 3
countries
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 168, 174. "Yoruba: Population: 17,000,000; Location: Nigeria, Benin, Togo; Language: Yoruba; Pg. 174: "The religious life of the Yoruba is varied. Most are Christian or Muslim, but some still practice their indigenous religious customs, which include the belief in one supreme god and over 400 lesser gods... "
Yoruba world - - - - 1998 Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998); pg. v. "These twenty-eight religious groups ar representative, but arbitrary. We chose Hopis to convey the sense of all Native American traditions, though there are wide differences among the more than 500 traditions. Similarly, Yorubas stand for all African tribal religions of which there are hundreds. "
Yoruba religion Africa - - - - 1993 Willis, Roy (ed.). World Mythology. New York: Henry Holt & Co. (1993); pg. 264. "With the spread of Islam and Christianity, and modern economic developments, Africa's indigenous religions have declined. But many peoples, such as the Yoruba, have tenaciously preserved their beliefs... "
Yoruba religion Brazil - - - - 1993 Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 2. "...Yoruba-based religious forms that exist in the Caribbean, in Central & South America... Santeria is the Cuban variant of this tradition. Shango in Trinidad and on Grenada, Xango and Candomble in Brazil, and Kele on St. Lucia are other examples... "
Yoruba religion Brazil - - - - 1993 Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 2. "...Yoruba-based religious forms that exist in the Caribbean, in Central & South America... Santeria is the Cuban variant of this tradition. Shango in Trinidad and on Grenada, Xango and Candomble in Brazil, and Kele on St. Lucia are other examples... "
Yoruba religion Brazil - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 14-15. "Afro-Brazilian sects are becoming increasingly popular with Blacks and Whites alike in Brazil. There are a variety of religious groupings that continue to follow traditional African religious practices. The first is Condomble, a religion practiced by slaves from the Yoruba tribe. Based largely in the state of Bahia, Condomble followers worship many different gods and goddesses of nature... It has been estimated that over 1,000 Condomble temples exist in the city of Salvador, Bahia. "
Yoruba religion Cuba - - - - 1993 Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 2. "...Yoruba-based religious forms that exist in the Caribbean, in Central & South America... Santeria is the Cuban variant of this tradition. Shango in Trinidad and on Grenada, Xango and Candomble in Brazil, and Kele on St. Lucia are other examples... "
Yoruba religion Grenada - - - - 1993 Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 2. "...Yoruba-based religious forms that exist in the Caribbean, in Central & South America... Santeria is the Cuban variant of this tradition. Shango in Trinidad and on Grenada, Xango and Candomble in Brazil, and Kele on St. Lucia are other examples... "
Yoruba religion Haiti - - - - 1993 Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 2. "Yoruba religion also entered Haiti to compose there, along with Kongo-Angolan and Dahomeyan practices, the kaleidoscope that is the religion of Vodun. "
Yoruba religion Nigeria: Ibadan - - - - 1895 Hallett, Robin. Africa Since 1875: A Modern History; Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press (1974); pg. 336. "Yoruba religion was founded on a pantheon numbering about 400 deities. [in] 1890's, a visitor to Ibadan [spoke of] 'a great number of small idol-houses'; by 1950 the city contained no more than 50 modest pagan shrines. "
Yoruba religion Nigeria: Ibadan - - 50
units
- 1950 Hallett, Robin. Africa Since 1875: A Modern History; Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press (1974); pg. 336. "Traditional Yoruba religion was founded on a pantheon numbering about 400 deities... by 1950 the city contained no more than 50 modest pagan shrines. "
Yoruba religion Nigeria: Ibadan - 13.00% - - 1952 Hallett, Robin. Africa Since 1875: A Modern History; Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press (1974). [Source: G. Parrinder, Religion in an African City (London, 1953)]; pg. 336. "A survey of religious observances in the Yoruba city of Ibadan [1952]... showed that no more than 13%... were still adherents of the old 'pagan' religion, while 30% were Christian & 57% Muslim "
Yoruba religion Nigeria: Ijebu - 6.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 464-465. "Yoruba: Location: West Africa (primarily Nigeria; also Benin and Togo); Population: 5,248,340 "; "In the last census the number of Yoruba who said that the adhere to their ancestral religion, rather than being Christians or Muslims, varied from 20% of the population in Oyo to only 6% in Ijebu. " [I don't know when "last census " was taken, but it probably wasn't 1998. Maybe 1963.]
Yoruba religion Nigeria: Oyo - 20.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 464-465. "Yoruba: Location: West Africa (primarily Nigeria; also Benin and Togo); Population: 5,248,340 "; "In the last census the number of Yoruba who said that the adhere to their ancestral religion, rather than being Christians or Muslims, varied from 20% of the population in Oyo to only 6% in Ijebu. " [I don't know when "last census " was taken, but it probably wasn't 1998. Maybe 1963.]
Yoruba religion Saint Lucia - - - - 1993 Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 2. "...Yoruba-based religious forms that exist in the Caribbean, in Central & South America... Santeria is the Cuban variant of this tradition. Shango in Trinidad and on Grenada, Xango and Candomble in Brazil, and Kele on St. Lucia are other examples... "
Yoruba religion South Carolina - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 106. "Outside of Sheldon, S.C., is the Yoruba village of Oyo-Tunji, a community established by priests of the Orisha-Voodoo... various... Yoruban rituals are practices. "
Yoruba religion Trinidad and Tobago - - - - 1993 Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 2. "...Yoruba-based religious forms that exist in the Caribbean, in Central & South America... Santeria is the Cuban variant of this tradition. Shango in Trinidad and on Grenada, Xango and Candomble in Brazil, and Kele on St. Lucia are other examples... "
Yoruba religion world - - - - 1750 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 358. "The integration of Catholic and African beliefs was not as unlikely as it might seem. Most of the slaves who were taken to Portuguese colonies in Brazil or to French or Spanish colonies in the West Indies such as Haiti and Cuba came from an area of West Africa that slave traders called the Mina or Slave Coast (modern Togo, Benin, Ghana, and part of Nigeria). A preponderance of them, especially in Brazil and Cuba, were members of the Yoruba (or Nago) people, who practiced a religion that made extensive use of animal sacrifice in which some part of the sacrificial animal was consumed. It was not such a great leap, then for the slaves to embrace elements of the Catholic religion, with its mass... "
Yoruba religion world 6,000,000 - - - 1970 Hopfe, Lews M. Religions of the World, Macmillan Publishing Co.: New York (1983; 3rd ed.). [Orig. source: Noel Q. King, Religions of Africa (New York: Harper & Row, 1970), pp. 15-24.]; pg. 60. "The Yoruba number over six million people, and though some of them are to be found in Dahomey, they live mainly in southwestern Nigeria. "
Yoruba religion world 15,000,000 - - - 1991 Eliade, Mircea & Ioan P. Couliano. The Eliade Guide to World Religions. Harper Collins: New York (1991); pg. 12-13. "The religion of the Yoruba, practiced by over fifteen million people in Negeria and the surrounding countries such as Benin, is probably the largest African religion. "
Yoruba religion world 30,000,000 - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "There are more than one hundred million adherents of the various traditional religions of Africa, North America, South America, Asia, and the South Pacific... Some are even expanding to the status of world religions: the Yoruba religion, for example, has more than 30 million adherents and has spread from its homeland in Nigeria to Brazil and the Caribbean where its variants go by the names Candomble and Santeria. "
Yoruba religion world - - - - 1993 Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 20. "The Yoruba appear to have entered southern Nigeria before A.D. 1000.... evolved... a pattern of religious belief and practice which has become a diasporic tradition with millions of adherents in the Americas. "
Yoruba religion world - - - - 1993 Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 1-2. "In global context Santeria belongs to the transatlantic tradition of Yoruba religion, a religious tradition with millions of adherents in Africa and the Americas, and should be seen as a variant of that tradition, just as there are regional and doctrinal variants within the Christian, Buddhist, and Islamic religious traditions... series of Yoruba-based religious forms that exist in the Caribbean, in Central & South America, and now in the United States as well. Santeria is the Cuban variant of this tradition. Shango in Trinidad and on Grenada, Xango and Candomble in Brazil, and Kele on St. Lucia are other examples... also entered Haiti... "
Yoruba religion world - - - - 1998 Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998); pg. 53. "Yorubas. The world was nothin but a sea of lava, said the Yorubas, an ancient tribe living along the Niger River in Africa. So God sent spirits--orishas--to create the land... Beginning in the seventeenth century, Yorubas were brough to America as slaves. In Cuba their religion mixed with Catholicism. Orishas were viewed as saints and the new faith was called Santeria... Yorubas believe that... Many Yorubas now are Muslims or Christians, but underneath they continue to believe in orishas who fight and dance and help needy humans... "
Yoruba Temple New York - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 106. "Members of the Yoruba Temple, a black nationalist sect based in New York, claim to follow the practices of ancient African Yoruba religion. "
Young Calvinist Federation USA 15,000 - 700
units
- 1988 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 111. "In 1919... members of the Christian Reformed Church founded the Young Calvinist Federation [a special purpose group, NOT a religion or denomination] as a way of furthering the activities of youth groups in local churches. Today, the organization counts 15,000 members in 700 local groups in 49 states. "
Youth for Christ Burkina Faso - - - - 1988 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 270. "Youth for Christ... attracted 12,000 to a rally in Africa's Burkina Faso (formerly Upper Volta). "
Youth for Christ world - - - 37
countries
1988 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 270. "Youth for Christ operates teen centers throughout Europe, drew young people from thirty-seven countries to a 1988 conference... "
Yscani North America - Southern Great Plains 360 - - - 1782 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Yscani world 360 - - - 1782 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Yuchi North America 5,000 - - - 1650 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 12. Estimates of total population from another source.; "They lived in east Tennessee and Georgia. "
Yuchi North America 1,216 - - - 1949 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 12. "Their population was estimated at 5,000 in the sixteenth century. The 1949 tribal census numbered their descendants at 1,216, half of whom were of mixed ancestry. "
Yuchi North America - Southeastern Woodlands 2,500 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Yuchi world 2,500 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Yuki North America - Pacific Coast 2,500 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber). Listed in table as "Yuki and Coast Yuki "; No other Yuki listed.
Yuki world 2,500 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Listed in table as "Yuki and Coast Yuki "; No other Yuki listed.
Yuma North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 3,000 - - - 1776 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Yuma world 3,000 - - - 1776 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)


Yuma, continued

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