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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to white supremacist groups - other, Wisconsin

white supremacist groups - other, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
white supremacist groups - sympathizers USA 200,000 - - - 1988 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990). [Original source: Bishop, Katherine, "Juding the Danger of the Right Fringe, " New York Times, "Week in Review, " March 6, 1988, p. 5]; pg. 65. "...the white supremacist movement is thought to have all-told some 20,000 members and perhaps as many as 200,000 sympathizers. "
White-Robed Monks of St. Benedict world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "Notable Independent Churches having separated from this Church since 1550: Old Catholics: White-Robed Monks of St. Benedict; Polish National Catholic Church; American Catholic Church "
Wholistic World Vision Australia - - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Wholistic World Vision is a network for communication of spiritual awareness. The movement was founded in Eastborne, England by Simon Peter Fuller and the Wholistic World Vision group. In 1990 Spirit guidance is said to have triggered major Earth-energy rituals in England. These culminated in the making of an Aquarian Cross in Jerusalem and a ceremonial raising on Glastonbury Tor on April 21st 1991. The event was called an 'Aeon shift' and signifies the movement, approximately every 200 years, of the main planetary energy centre at the start of the new age. Since this time Simon Peter Fuller has travelled the world speaking of the Second Coming of the Christ Consciousness, while using the Aquarian Cross as a focal point for energy re-alignment work on many of the Earth's sacred sites of power. "
Wicca Australia 1,849 0.01% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Listed in table as "Wicca/Witchcraft ", presumably because respondents used both terms.]
Wicca California: San Diego County - - 25
units
- 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 74. "In the San Diego area alone there are more than two dozen covens including two high school covens with fifty members each. "
Wicca France - - - - 1994 Halverson, Dean C. (ed.) The Compact Guide to World Religions; Colorado Springs, Colorado: International Students Inc. (1996). [Publisher is an Evangelical missionary organization.]; pg. 38. "There are more registered witches in France than there are Catholic priests. " [Original source: Myers, Bryant. "What's going on? " MARC Newsletter. Monrovia, Calif.: MARC Publications, September 1994, no. 94-3]
Wicca Germany 10,000 - - - 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 72. "In Germany, according to the German Medical Information Service, 10,000 people are engaged in witchcraft, with the numbers increasing steadily since 1968. "
Wicca New Zealand 792 0.02% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1996 NZ population: 3,616,633.
Wicca North America 2,000 - - - 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 73. "the conservative estimate of Nat Freedland, author of The Occult Explosion, who says, 'From the visible manifestations of the witchcraft scene it's doubtful if there are more than 6 or 7 thousand really active practicing witches around today--3,000 in England... perhaps 2,000 in North America, and another one or two thousand scattered around the globe. "
Wicca North America 100,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* "World View: 25% of World Christians Are Pentecostal " [headline of a miscellaneous religious news briefs section] in Salt Lake Tribune (3 Oct. 1998). [Orig. source: AP] About 100,000 people practice Wicca in the United States and Canada, [Wiccan high priestess Rosemary Kooiman] said.
Wicca United Kingdom - - - - 1959 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1867-1869. "After the witch-hunting fury of the 17th century, witchcraft declined in England. Some 300 years after the Witch-Finder General, Matthew Hopkins, had terrorized the eastern countries, a series of books appeared which set the scene for the modern reappearance of the ancient craft. Margaret Murray's The Witch-Cult in Western Europe (1921) argued that witchcraft had not been an anti-Christian perversion but the survival of pre-Christian paganism. IN 1949 Gerald Gardner published a novel High Magic's Aid, which purported to give authentic details of witchcraft practice; this was followed five years later by a non-fiction book, Witchcraft Today... Gardner proselytized for the witches in a further book, The Meaning of Witchcraft published in 1959, and attracted a great deal of largely hostile publicity from the newspapers befor his death in 1964. "
Wicca United Kingdom: England 3,000 - - - 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 73. "the conservative estimate of Nat Freedland, author of The Occult Explosion, who says, 'From the visible manifestations of the witchcraft scene it's doubtful if there are more than 6 or 7 thousand really active practicing witches around today--3,000 in England... perhaps 2,000 in North America, and another one or two thousand scattered around the globe. "
Wicca United Kingdom: England 30,000 - - - 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 72. "Today there are 30,000 practicing witches in England. "
Wicca United Kingdom: England 30,000 - - - 1987 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Orig. source: Adherents.com] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... Witchcraft: England 30,000 (1987); World: estimates vary from 50,000 to 800,000 (1996) "
Wicca United Kingdom: England 30,000 - - - 1987 King, Ursula (ed.). Women in the World's Religions; New York: Paragon House (1987); pg. 206-207. "...in the World Christian Encyclopedia it is stated that there are currently 'about 30,000 practising self-styled witches who practice occultism and black magic in England.' "
Wicca USA - - - - 1965 Berger, Helen A. A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-Paganism and Witchcraft in the United States. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press (1999); pg. 12. "Raymond Buckland, a student of Gardner, is credited with introducing Wicca in the United States (Kelly 1992). Since migrating in the 1960s, Witchcraft has grown and taken a particularly American flavor. Mysticism, ecological concerns, women's rights, and anti-authoritarianism have all been incorporated into this religion. Wicca in the U.S. is more eclectic than the religion in present day Great Britain (Orion 1995). "
Wicca USA 20,000 - - - 1972 Godwin, John. Occult America; Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company, Inc. (1972); pg. 66. "The number of functioning covens in America is a moot point... But one of my inside contacts assured me that there were at least twenty thousand organized members in this country. "
Wicca USA 50,000 - - - 1980 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 100. "For a while the movement seemed to flourish with an estimated 40 to 50 thousand practicing witches in the U.S. alone, though the number is quite impossible to verify. But witchcraft was never really organized... hostility toward modern witchcraft actually seemed to decline in the U.S. during the 1980s... By the 1990s, however, the popularity of modern witchcraft seemed to be fading. Since it was never possible to determine how many people were actually committed to witchcraft, it is of course impossible to know how far their numbers have fallen. But there has certainly been a sharp drop in publicity... Religious groups that have stepped up their denunciations of all occult groups... have once again begun to energetically denounce witchcraft--but there now is very little left to denounce. Witchcraft seems to have been absorbed into that large and amorphous body of beliefs and practices known as New Age Religion. "
Wicca USA 10,000,000 - - - 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 72. "One witch says there are nearly ten million practicing witches in America. The same supposedly authoritative source within witchcraft says that of these, four million are officially registered with witchcraft centers. That would mean there are more registered witches in America than there are registered Episcopalians or Presbyterians. We think that is a case of witchful thinking. "
Wicca USA - - 400
units
- 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 73. "Sybil Leek, a self-styled... witch as well as a medium, says that the witch population was exploded 40% in the past 5 years. Today more than four hundred covens are scattered across the country, according to Sybil. "
Wicca USA 8,000 - - - 1990 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 242. "In 1990 Barry A. Kosmin (1991) and his colleagues at the City University of New York conducted the largest survey ever devoted to American religious affiliation. All told, 113,000 randomly sampled Americans were interviewed about their religious preference. Because such an immense samlpe yields very stable statistics, Kosmin projected his distributions back to the total adult population of the 48 congiguous states. Kosmin projected a nationwide total of 8,000 members of Wiccan groups... "
Wicca USA 8,000 - - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 15-17. Table 1-2: Self-Described Adherence of U.S. Adult Population 1990. Phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by Graduate School of City U. of New York.
Wicca USA 300,000 - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 340. "...methods for estimating the size... arrive at figures between 1000 and 5000 covens, whose members (numbering in the tens of thousands) serve as clergy for the overall movement which has perhaps several thousand members. "
Wicca USA - - 5,000
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 340. "difficult to obtain accurate demographic data for [Neo-Pagan Witchcraft movement]... several independent methods for estimating size...based on factors such as [periodical circulation, festival attendance] arrive at figures between 1000 & 5000 covens "
Wicca USA 50,000 - - - 1993 *LINK* Religious Requirements & Practices of Certain Selected Groups: A Handbook for Chaplains (1993) - (online ed. - 1998); contract #: MDA903-90-C-0062 w/ Dept. of Defense; J. Gordon Melton, Project Director & James Lewis. "MEMBERSHIP: Because of the complete autonomy of covens, this cannot be determined. There are an estimated of 50,000 Wiccans in the united States. "
Wicca USA 200,000 - - - 1993 Long, Robert Emmet (ed.). Religious Cults in America (The Reference Shelf: Volume 66 Number 4), New York: The H. W. Wilson Co. (1994). [Orig. source: "The Craft of the Wise " by Jan Phillips, Ms. (3:78-79 Ja/F 1993)]; pg. 167. "The follow the traditions of a pre-Christian, goddess-centered religion called Wicca that emphasizes the unity of the sacred and secular realms. An estimated 200,000 people in the U.S. practice the Old Religion... "
Wicca USA - - 30,000
units
- 1996 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) [Orig. source: Lewis, James R. 1996. Magical Religion and Modern Witchcraft. Albany: State University of New York Press.] A recent estimate is that there exist somewhere between 300-30,000 covens in the United States today. This tremendous range in estimated size effectively says that no one knows.
Wicca USA 200,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* official web site of Covenant of the Goddess; web page: "CoG: Commonly Asked Questions (viewed 27 Feb. 1999); "Produced & published by Homebrewed Productions " "Conservative reckonings estimate 200,000 Witches and/or Neo-Pagans in the US alone. "
Wicca USA 50,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* U.S. Army's Religious Requirements & Practices of Certain Selected Groups: A Handbook for Chaplains (pgs 231-236) MEMBERSHIP: Because of the complete autonomy of covens, this cannot be determined. There are an estimated of 50,000 Wiccans in the United States.
Wicca USA 10,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Christian Research Journal " (P.O. Box 7000; Rancho Santa Margarita); web page: "The Modern World of Witchcraft: Part One of Two " by Craig S. Hawkins (viewed 27 Feb. 1999) "For various reasons, it is difficult if not impossible to assign a number to the witches in North America. 'Ballpark' estimates on the conservative side, however, would place the figure approximately between 5,000 and 10,000. More liberal estimates range between 30,000 and 50,000 for witches, and upwards of 70,000 to 80,000 for all neopagans. "
Wicca USA 200,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Edwards, Catherine. "Wicca Casts Spell on Teen-Age Girls " in Insight online magazine, Vol. 15, No. 39 -- October 25, 1999. (viewed online 6 Oct. 1999). Published date: 1 Oct. 1999 (Washington, D.C.) "Helen Berger, associate professor of sociology at the University of Westchester in Pennsylvania, has surveyed more than 2,000 Wiccans for her research. Estimates cited by Berger and Christian-apologist Craig Hawkins in his book Witchcraft: Exploring the World of Wicca put the U.S. witch population at the 150,000 to 200,000 mark. "
Wicca USA 5,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Edwards, Catherine. "Wicca Casts Spell on Teen-Age Girls " in Insight online magazine, Vol. 15, No. 39 -- October 25, 1999. (viewed online 6 Oct. 1999). Published date: 1 Oct. 1999 (Washington, D.C.) "...Phyllis Curott, attorney and author of The Book of Shadows: A Modern Woman's Journey Into the Wisdom of Witchcraft and the Magic of the Goddess... Demographics of Wiccans in the United States are difficult to find. There is much to-do about secrecy, and groups do not release membership rolls. Curott estimates there are 3 million to 5 million Wiccans. "
Wicca USA - - - - 1999 *LINK* Edwards, Catherine. "Wicca Casts Spell on Teen-Age Girls " in Insight online magazine, Vol. 15, No. 39 -- October 25, 1999. (viewed online 6 Oct. 1999). Published date: 1 Oct. 1999 (Washington, D.C.) "Fritz Jung and Wren Walker, practicing Wiccans who live in Clearwater, Fla., maintain that their Website witchvox.com is the busiest religious site in the world. In a Web survey conducted on that site in September, 60 percent of respondents were under 30 and 62 percent were female. Berger found in her survey that 90 percent of Wiccan respondents were white and well-educated. "
Wicca USA 50,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Kirby, Robert. "Kirby: If Georgia Lawmaker Forces Witches Out of Military, Good Christian Bombs Will Reign Supreme " in Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, June 26, 1999 (viewed online 26 June 1999). "An Associated Press story estimated that 50,000 Americans practice Wicca, a form of polytheistic nature worship. "
Wicca Utah 5,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Mims, Bob. "Seasonal Witches Take Flight, Wiccans Remain With Us " in Salt Lake Tribune, 30 Oct. 1999 (v. online). "Five centuries later, witches are a far cry from the wretches Shakespeare envisioned huddled in a Scottish cavern or conjuring on a dark, dreary heath. Instead, on a recent evening, 11 of the state's estimated 3,000-5,000 practitioners of Wicca, or 'The Craft,' preferred the front room of a third-floor South Salt Lake apartment complex. "
Wicca world - - - - 1692 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 90-93. Pg. 90: "...persecution of accused witches was never as severe in America as... Europe, [but] some of the last major witchcraft trials [in] Western world were those that took place in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1692... "; Pg. 92: "The view that witchcraft was an imaginary crime became the dominant one... "; Pg. 93: "In the 1920s, a British scholar named Margaret Murray reexamined some of the evidence that had been produced at the European witch trials & came to a surprising conclusion... there had been real witches. In fact, there had been a large & powerful underground witch religion... well-organized pagan religion that predated Christianity but had been forced underground by militant Christians... At first, Murray's theory... got a lot of serious attention... But in later works she went on to try to prove that well-known historical figures like Joan of Arc & many of the kings of England had really been devotees... At that point scholars began regarding her as a crank. "
Wicca world - - - - 1945 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 94-95. "Professor Murray said that the witch cult had been completely wiped out during the witchcraft persecutions. In the 1940s, Gerald Gardner, a former British customs official in Malaya and a man of wide-raning and often strange interests, stepped forward to disagree. Yes, he said, Professor Murray was right about the existence of an underground witch cult, but she was wrong when she said the cult had been exterminated. He claimed that he was a practicing witch and a member of an ancient coven that had carried on the traditions of what he called the 'Old Religion' for many centuries... There has never been any independent evidence that Gardner ever was in contact with any ancient witch coven. Gardner's witchcraft--the Old Religion, the Craft, or Wicca ('the wise')... "
Wicca world - - - - 1951 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1867. "in the eyes of Wicca members... [it] is of vast antiquity, predating Christianity by thousands of years. In fact, as a modern..., Wicca has been in operatino for less than 20 years; it was only with the passing of the Fraudulent Mediums Act of 1951 that it was able legally to present itself to society at all. This Act, which restricted prosecution only to those who obtained money from the public under the pretext of possessing supernatural power, enabled spirit mediums and astrologers, as well as witches, to practise their arts legally in the open for the first time in hundreds of years. "
Wicca world 7,000 - - - 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 73. "the conservative estimate of Nat Freedland, author of The Occult Explosion, who says, 'From the visible manifestations of the witchcraft scene it's doubtful if there are more than 6 or 7 thousand really active practicing witches around today--3,000 in England... perhaps 2,000 in North America, and another one or two thousand scattered around the globe. "
Wicca world 800,000 - - - 1996 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Orig. source: Adherents.com] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... Witchcraft: England 30,000 (1987); World: estimates vary from 50,000 to 800,000 (1996) "
Wicca world 800,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "Shadows " (Luke Wa); web page: "Neopaganism " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999); paper written by Walter Luke. "...Wiccans... the religion claims from 50,000 to 800,000 members (Manfred 1996:85), more than Quakers... "
Wichita North America 3,200 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 49. "Wichita... They numbered 3,200 in 1780 and 460 in 1970. "
Wichita North America 460 - - - 1970 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 49. "Wichita... They numbered 3,200 in 1780 and 460 in 1970. "
Wichita North America - Southern Great Plains 3,200 - - - 1778 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wichita world 3,200 - - - 1778 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wider Quaker Fellowship USA 3,840 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 118. "the Wider Quaker Fellowship... has 4,200 members, 360 of whom live abroad. "
Wider Quaker Fellowship USA 3,840 - - - 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). pg. 149; "...Wider Quaker Fellowship, in which non-Friends in sympathy with the spirit and program may participate in the work without coming into full membership. It has 4,200 members, 360 of whom live abroad. "
Wider Quaker Fellowship world 4,200 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 118. "the Wider Quaker Fellowship, in which non-Friends in sympathy with the spirit and program may participate... without coming into full membership. This is not so much an organization as 'a fellowship of kindred minds--a way of life, a contagion of spirit'; it has 4,200 members, 360 of whom live abroad. "
Wider Quaker Fellowship world 4,200 - - - 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). pg. 149; "...Wider Quaker Fellowship, in which non-Friends in sympathy with the spirit and program may participate in the work without coming into full membership. It has 4,200 members, 360 of whom live abroad. "
Willow Creek Community Church Illinois 15,000 - - - 1998 Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe. "Religion " in The Future Now: Predicting the 21st Century. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (1998); pg. 53. "The parish is dead. The Next Church is more like a stadium. By cramming in big numbers--and the Next Church works with congregations of thousands rather than hundreds--pastors can make economies of scale. some of them talk about th emodels of the shopping mall and multi-screen cinema. The pastor of America's biggest congregation--15,000 strong in Illinois--speaks of 'increasing our market share'. When Next Church congregations found new communities or colonize new premises, it is like a franchising operation. "
Willow Creek Community Church Illinois: Chicago 14,650 - - - 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table, grouped by state, columns for city, state, "size " (avg. weekly attendance), etc. From study finding all U.S. megachurches (congreg. w/ "consistent weekly attendance of at least 2,000 persons "); independent, Bill Hybels pastor.
Willow Creek Community Church world 75 - - - 1975 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992); pg. 247. "From a modest gathering of 125 people who first met in a rented movie theater in 1975, it has grown to become the nation's number two Protestant congregation in tems of weekend attendance... second only to Jack Hyles's... First Baptist Church... "
Willow Creek Community Church world 5,950 - 200
units
1
country
1991 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992); pg. 247. "Willow Creek's evangelism philosophy--rooted in its marketing survey, its dynamic pastor, and its 4,200 beleivers and 1,750 lay leaders--that has catapulted the independent congregation to the top. " More than 200 small study groups.
Willow Creek Community Church - attendance Illinois 12,000 - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 290. "...Willow Creek Community Church in Illinois, the second-largest Protestant church in the U.S. Each week 12,000 attend services in the $15 million complex featuring Christian rock music and a multimedia show. "
Willow Creek Community Church - attendance USA 13,000 - - - 1992 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 363. "The largest of the U.S. Protestant supercongregations (Osling 1992:63) are: First Baptist Church in Hammond, IN (attendance 20,000); Willow Creek Community Church in South Barrington, Illinois (attendance 13,000)... "
Willow Creek Community Church - attendance world 13,000 - - 1
country
1992 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 363. "The largest of the U.S. Protestant supercongregations (Osling 1992:63) are: First Baptist Church in Hammond, IN (attendance 20,000); Willow Creek Community Church in South Barrington, Illinois (attendance 13,000)... "
Winnebago Nebraska - - 1
unit
- 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 27. "Winnebago... They lived north of the west bank of Lake Michigan (Door Peninsula and Green Bay)... Many were decimated by illness and epidemics... The Winnebago reservation in Nebraska is also shared with the Omaha. "
Winnebago North America - Central Prairies and Woodlands 3,800 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 240. Table: "Central Prairies and Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Winnebago USA 6,920 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Winnebago world 3,800 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 240. Table: "Central Prairies and Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Winnebago world - - 1
unit
1
country
1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 27. "Many were decimated by illness and epidemics... The Winnebago reservation in Nebraska is also shared with the Omaha. "
Winner's Chapel Nigeria 25,000 - - - 2000 *LINK* Tucker, Neely (Knight Ridder). "Growth of Christianity Is Exploding in Africa " in Salt Lake Tribune (15 Jan 2000). "Pentecostal... David Oyedepo's Winner's Chapel outside Lagos draws more than 25,000 people to each Sunday service, one of the world's largest regular worship services. "
Wintun North America - Pacific Coast 12,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Patwin, Wintu.
Wintun world 12,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Patwin, Wintu.
Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod Alabama 340 0.01% 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 227. [Listed as 'Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod.']


Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod, continued

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