Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Waktu Lima, Indonesia: Lombok

Waktu Lima, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Waktu Lima Indonesia: Lombok - Sasak - - - - 1972 *LINK* Cederroth, Sven. "From Ancestor Worship to Monotheism: Politics of Religion in Lombok " in Temenos 32 (1996), 7-36. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999). "1972...conflict between religious sects in Lombok... religious persecution that had taken place a few years earlier and which had intensified the latent conflict. As a result of these events, the centuries-old indigenous wetu telu religion had almost been eradicated and almost all Sasak were now said to be believers of waktu lima, an orthodox Islamic sect. "
Walapai North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 700 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Walapai world 700 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Waldensian Europe - - - - 1217 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 802. "Waldenses... Once rejected by the church, Waldo and his followers organized themselves... They followed a morally rigorous mode of life and spread rapidly by preaching, carrying their message throughout southern France, northern Italy, Spain, and central Europe, including Bohemia, where Waldo died in 1217. "
Waldensian Germany 3,500 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Evangelische Waldenserkirche: Deutsche Waldenserkirche / Freundeskreis der Waldenser " in table. Source: REMID.
Waldensian Italy - - - - 1100 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton; pg. 473. "...small groups arose in the 11th and 12th centuries, resolved to carry out, among themselves, the changes that had proved impracticable in the Church as a whole. Southern France and northern Italy swarmed with sects... the Waldenses denied the authority of the orthodox Church, appointed lay preachers... the Church launched the Inquisition... the Waldenses found refuge near the timberline of the Italian Alps and survive to this day. "
Waldensian Italy - - - - 1175 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 326. "Waldensianism. Around 1175, a wealthy former merchant in Lyons named Peter Waldo, transformed by the sudden death of a friend, gave all his possessions to the poor. He went on to teach a literal application of the communal poverty practiced by the apostles and early Christians; like the Bogomils, he rejected most church doctrine not specifically spelled out in the New Testament. Some Waldensians opposed bloodshed in any form, including so-called just wars and capital punishment. "
Waldensian Italy - - - - 1848 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 802. ".Persecution continued sporadically until 1848, when full religious freedom was granted to those Waldenses still in northern Italy. "
Waldensian Italy 100,000 - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 230. "Today there are 100,000 Waldensians in Italy. "
Waldensian Italy - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "WALDENSIANS: a twelfth century Italian REFORM movement in the ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH which was persecuted but survived until the PROTESTANT REFORMATION which its members supported. Although still a very small minority in Italy, the Church has managed to survive until today and operates a theological college in Rome. "
Waldensian Italy 25,000 - - - 1995 "LDS Prospects in Italy for the Twenty-first Century " in Dialogue: A Journal of Mormon Thought (Spring 1996); pg. 153. -
Waldensian Italy 99,900 0.18% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 160-161. "Location: Italy; Population: About 57 million "; "There are about 150,000 Protestants living in Italy, two thirds of them belonging to the sect known as Waldensians. "
Waldensian Italy: Piedmont 20,000 - - - 1850 Cowan, Richard O. & Bruce A. Van Orden. The International Church: Readings for Religion C344; Provo, Utah: Brigham Young University (Fall 1992); pg. 62. "The Waldensis found refuge across the Alps in the Lombardy region of what is now northern Italy. There were approx. 20,000 Waldenses in the Piedmont in 1850 when Mormon missionaries learned about them. "
Walla Walla Oregon 1,000 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 72. "Walla Walla... The Umatilla reservation in Oregon has a combined population of 1,000 (including Umatilla, Cayuse, and Walla Walla). "
Walloon Belgium 3,357,724 33.00% - - 1998 *LINK* CIA World Factbook 1998 (viewed June 24, 1999) "Population: 10,174,922 (July 1998 est.)... Ethnic groups: Fleming 55%, Walloon 33%, mixed or other 12% "
Wampanoag North America - - - - 1621 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 19. "Wampanoag. Language: Algonquian. They lived in present-day Massachusetts and Rhode Island... Massasoit, their chief, helped the Mayflower Pilgrims in 1621. The settlement of the colonists was at the expense of other tribes. Massasoit died in 1662. His eldest son whom the Whites called King Philip, succeeded him. In 1675 and 1676, he led a bloody war against the colonists and their allies, the Mohegan. Killed in 1676, his Nation was then divided. Some of the survivors were sold as slaves. "
Wampanoag North America - Eastern Woodlands 2,400 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wampanoag world 2,400 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wang Mingdao China - - - - 1949 Lambert, Tony. The Resurrection of the Chinese Church; Wheaton, IL: Harold Shaw Publishers (1994); pg. 14. "...the ministry of Wang Mingdao, an independent evangelical preacher who built his own Christian Tabernacle in Beijing, was widely influential among Chinese Christians both before and after 1949. "
Wappinger North America - Eastern Woodlands 4,750 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wappinger world 4,750 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wappo North America - Pacific Coast 1,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wappo world 1,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Warrau Venezuela - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "
Warren Baptist Association USA - - - - 1767 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 97. "Urging that New England Baptists fall in line, in 1967 Elder Backus and Dr. Manning took the lead in establishing the Warren Baptist Association, made up of churches scattered over the wide region of Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island, with Warren, Massachusetts, as its center. "
Wasco North America - Pacific Coast 900 - - - 1822 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wasco world 900 - - - 1822 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Washa, Opelousa, Okelousa, and Chawasha North America - Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps 1,000 - - - 1698 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Washa, Opelousa, Okelousa, and Chawasha (1698): 1,000 (?) "
Washa, Opelousa, Okelousa, and Chawasha world 1,000 - - - 1698 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Washa, Opelousa, Okelousa, and Chawasha (1698): 1,000 (?) "
Washoe Nevada 800 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 69. "Washoe... Numbered at 1,000 in 1845, the tribal lists total about 800 in Nevada today. "
Washoe North America 1,000 - - - 1845 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 69. "Washoe... Numbered at 1,000 in 1845, the tribal lists total about 800 in Nevada today. "
Washoe North America - Great Basin 1,000 - - - 1845 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 389. Table: "The Great Basin: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Washoe world 1,000 - - - 1845 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 389. Table: "The Great Basin: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wati Togo - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Watlala North America - Pacific Coast 2,300 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Watlala world 2,300 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Way International world 35,000 - - - 1975 *LINK* web site: "New Religious Movements " (University of Virginia); web page: "Way International " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Maria J. Whitmore For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " "Since The Way International has never published organizational statistics, estimates must be treated with caution. It is clear that the group reached a peak membership sometime in the 1970s around 35,000 and went into a period of decline after that date (The Watchman Expositor page). "
Way International world 20,000 - - 52
countries
1980 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980); pg. 55. [emerged from Wierwille's 'Power for Abundant Living' classes] "About 200 Way followers live and study at the New Knoxville center. They claim twenty to one hundred thousand additional members throughout the United States and fifty-one other countries. "
Way International world 100,000 - - 52
countries
1980 Rudin, James A. & Marcia R. Rudin. Prison or Paradise: The New Religious Cults; Fortress Press: Philadelphia (1980); pg. 55. [emerged from Wierwille's 'Power for Abundant Living' classes] "About 200 Way followers live and study at the New Knoxville center. They claim twenty to one hundred thousand additional members throughout the United States and fifty-one other countries. "
Way International world - - - - 1982 Long, Robert Emmet (ed.). Religious Cults in America (The Reference Shelf: Volume 66 Number 4), New York: The H. W. Wilson Co. (1994). [Orig. source: Article by J. Gordon Melton. From appendix A of The Cult Experience, Cleveland, OH: The Pilgrim Press (1982)]; pg. 97. "Headquarters of the Way International are in New Knoxville, Ohio... An annual gathering, the Rock of Ages, is held there and attracts followers in the tens of thousands from both the United States and abroad. "
Way International world - - - - 1982 Melton, J. Gordon & Robert L. Moore. The Cult Experience: Responding to the New Religious Pluralism. New York: The Pilgrim Press (1984 [3rd printing; 1st printing 1982]); pg. 150. "An annual gathering, the Rock of Ages, is held there and attracts followers in the tens of thousands from both the United States and abroad. "
Way International world 40,000 - - - 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 271. Founded by Victor Paul Wierwille. "Today he has more than 40,000 disciples (some say the number may be 100,000), and with assets of $50 million Wierwill and Company are sending missionaries around the world. "
Way International world - - - 41
countries
1993 *LINK* Religious Requirements & Practices of Certain Selected Groups: A Handbook for Chaplains (1993) - (online ed. - 1998); contract #: MDA903-90-C-0062 w/ Dept. of Defense; J. Gordon Melton, Project Director & James Lewis. "MEMBERSHIP: Although there is no formal membership, The Way reports there are people fellowshipping on a weekly basis in all fifty states and in forty other countries throughout the world. "
Way International world 20,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "New Religious Movements " (University of Virginia); web page: "Way International " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Maria J. Whitmore For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " "The Watchman Expositor estimates that membership in 1995 dropped to 20,000 and is down below 10,000 today. "
Way International world 100,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site (1998): "Christian Apologetics and Research Ministry "; web page: "The Way International " "Membership: Over one hundred thousand all over the world. "
Way International world 10,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "New Religious Movements " (University of Virginia); web page: "Way International " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Maria J. Whitmore For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " "The Watchman Expositor estimates that membership in 1995 dropped to 20,000 and is down below 10,000 today. "
Way International world 20,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "New Religious Movements " (University of Virginia); web page: "Way International " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Maria J. Whitmore For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " "Lewis, however, in a recently published encyclopedia claims that membership has begun to grow again. This would seem to be supported by reports in The Way Magazine (September/October 1998: 20-24) of significant numbers of persons participating in advanced PFAL classes in the summer of 1998. A recent estimate by Cynthia Kisser of the Cult Awareness Network (as quoted on the NoWayOut page) is 20,00 "
Way of Right Unity China - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Taoism; pg. 182-183. "Church Taoism can be divided into 2 main branches. The 1st, the Way of Right Unity (Cheng-i tao), encompasses schools that use magical practices such as amulets... begun by Chang Tao-ling (or Chang Ling, AD 34-156)... school he founded. The Five Pecks of Rice School (Wu-tou-me-tao)... remained active through the 15th century... also known as the School of the Celestial Masters (T'ien-shih tao), since Chang Ling was venerated as a Celestial Master... a title that was inherited by each of his successors down to the present day. (When this lineage of 'Taoist popes,' was kicked off the mainland by the Communists in 1949, it continued in Taiwan.) "
Way of Right Unity world - - - 2
countries
1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 67. "Cheng-i tao: 'Way of Right Unity'; collective term for all Taoist schools that use talismans, amulets, etc. as part of their religious practice. Next to the ch'uan-chen tao (Way of the Realization of Truth the cheng-i tao was the most important branch of religious Taoism since the time of the Yuan Dynasty... 1304 C.E... Since then all schools using talismans are considered to be part of the Way of Right Unity... The cheng-i tao still has active followers in Taiwan and Hong Kong. "
Way of Supreme Peace China - - - - 150 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Taoism; pg. 183. "During the 2nd century AD, famine and plagues caused great turmoil and led hundreds of thousands of Chinese to embrace Taoism, which offered a more personal and emotionally appealing form of religion than state Confucianism... One sect that especially profited from this development was the Way of Supreme Peace (T'ai-p'ing tao), founded by Chang Chueh (a follower of Huang-Lao Chun), who pursued conversion through the use of missionaries. "
Way of Supreme Peace China - - - - 175 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 744. "The tradition of fully developed Taoist religious movements began in the second century A.D. with the Way of the Great Peace (T'ai-p'ing Tao) and the Way of the Celestial Masters (T'ien-shih Tao), also known as the 'Teaching of the Five Pecks of Rice' (Wu-Tou-Chiao)... The T'ai-p'ing Tao (known also as 'the Yellow Turbans') led a rebellion agains the Han, and at one point controlled eight provinces... The T'ai-p'ing movement was destroyed when their bid to found a new order was supressed militarily. "
Way of Supreme Peace China 36,000 - - - 184 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 349-350. "T'ai-p'ing tao - Chin., lit. 'Way of Supreme Peace'; early Taoist school founded between 172 and 178 C.E. by Chang Chueh. It derived its name from its basic doctrinal text... As a result of his spectacular methods of healing, Chang Chueh attracted a vast following... In 184 C.E. 36,000 followers of the Way of Supreme Peace rose against the central governement. The rebels wore yellow head bands... "
Way of the Cross Church of Christ world 50,000 - - - 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Apostolic Pentecostals; pg. 271. "Way of the Cross Church of Christ... Washington, DC [H.Q.]... was founded in 1927 by Henry C. Brooks, an independent black Pentecostal minister... Membership: In 1980... had affiliated congregations with approx. 50,000 members. "
Wayne Trail Missionary Baptists Association Ohio 2,467 0.02% 11
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 1,934. [Listed as 'Wayne Trail Missionary Baptists Association.']
Wayne Trail Missionary Baptists Association USA 2,467 - 11
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 1,934. [Listed as 'Wayne Trail Missionary Baptists Association.']
Weaver Mennonites Pennsylvania 60 - 1
unit
1
country
1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: German Mennonites; pg. 307. "Weaver Mennonites... The one schism affecting the Stauffer Mennonite Church was occasioned by the issue of the strictness of the ban. In 1916, the son of aged Bishop Aaron Sensenig married outside the faith. The girl was received into the Stauffer Mennonite Church but later returned to her earlier heritage. The church was split over the strictness of the ban to be applied to the girl. The lenient group, led by Sensenig and John A. Weaver, left and began a new congregation and constructed a meeting house near New Holland, Pennsylvania. Membership: Not reported. There is one congregation of approximately 60 members. "
Weaverland Conference of Old Order Mennonites Pennsylvania 1,700 - 5
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: German Mennonites; pg. 307. "Weaverland Conference of Old Order (Horning or Black Bumber) Mennonites... Bishop Moses Horning (1870-1955) established a liberal wing of the Old Order (Wisler) Mennonites. His followers use automobiles, but nly for necessary purposes. The car must be black and without 'frivolous' trim. Most of the members cover the chrome with black paint to avoid further ostentation. Membership: Not reported. There are five congregations, all located in southeastern Pennsylvania, and approximately 1,700 members. "
Weaverland Conference of Old Order Mennonites world 1,700 - 5
units
1
country
1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 307. "five congregations, all [in] Pennsylvania, and approx. 1,700 members. "
Wee Free Church world - - 63
units
- 1901 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 819. "In 1901 the Free Church of Scotland and the United Presbyterian Church formed the United Free Church of Scotland. 25 ministers and 63 congregations of the Free Church, mostly Gaelic-speaking, abstained... "
Wee Free Church world 8,500 - - - 1929 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 819-820. "It has grown somewhat; in 1929 it had 8,500 communicants. "
Wenrohronon North America - Eastern Woodlands 2,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wenrohronon world 2,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wesleyan Church Alabama 2,205 0.05% 17
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 1,123. [Listed as 'The Wesleyan Church.']
Wesleyan Church Alaska 461 0.08% 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 68. [Listed as 'The Wesleyan Church.']
Wesleyan Church Arizona 2,147 0.06% 15
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 485. [Listed as 'The Wesleyan Church.']


Wesleyan Church, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus

Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.