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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Vipassana Meditation Centers, India: Uttar Pradesh

Vipassana Meditation Centers, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Vipassana Meditation Centers India: West Bengal - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in India " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) counted meditation centers listed in directory; West Bengal location: Calcutta
Vipassana Meditation Centers Italy - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in Europe " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Centers listed in directory: France, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom
Vipassana Meditation Centers Japan - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation " home page (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) "There are numerous Centers in India and Southern Asia; 5 Centers in North America; 4 Centers in Europe; 5 Centers in Australia/New Zealand; and 1 Center in Japan. Each Center maintains its own schedule of regular ten day Vipassana courses. "
Vipassana Meditation Centers Massachusetts - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in North America " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Centers listed in directory: Massachusetts; California; Texas; Pacific Northwest (Ethel, Wash); British Columbia, Canada
Vipassana Meditation Centers Myanmar - - 3
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in South Asia " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) counted meditation centers listed in directory; Yangon, Myanmar; Mandalay, Myanmar; Mogok, Myanmar
Vipassana Meditation Centers Nepal - - 2
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in South Asia " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) counted meditation centers listed in directory; Kathmandu, Nepal; Lumbini, Nepal
Vipassana Meditation Centers New Zealand - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in Australia/New Zealand " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Centers listed in directory: New South Wales, Queensland, Tasmania, Victoria, New Zealand
Vipassana Meditation Centers North America - - 5
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation " home page (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) "There are numerous Centers in India and Southern Asia; 5 Centers in North America; 4 Centers in Europe; 5 Centers in Australia/New Zealand; and 1 Center in Japan. Each Center maintains its own schedule of regular ten day Vipassana courses. "
Vipassana Meditation Centers North America - - 5
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in North America " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Centers listed in directory: Massachusetts; California; Texas; Pacific Northwest (Ethel, Wash); British Columbia, Canada
Vipassana Meditation Centers Sri Lanka - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in South Asia " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) counted meditation centers listed in directory; Cambodia; Yangon, Myanmar; Mandalay, Myanmar; Mogok, Myanmar; Kathmandu, Nepal; Lumbini, Nepal; Sri Lanka; Taiwan; Bangkok, Thailand; Phitsanulok, Thailand
Vipassana Meditation Centers Taiwan - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in South Asia " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) counted meditation centers listed in directory; Cambodia; Yangon, Myanmar; Mandalay, Myanmar; Mogok, Myanmar; Kathmandu, Nepal; Lumbini, Nepal; Sri Lanka; Taiwan; Bangkok, Thailand; Phitsanulok, Thailand
Vipassana Meditation Centers Texas - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in North America " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Centers listed in directory: Massachusetts; California; Texas; Pacific Northwest (Ethel, Wash); British Columbia, Canada
Vipassana Meditation Centers Thailand - - 2
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in South Asia " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) counted meditation centers listed in directory; Bangkok, Thailand; Phitsanulok, Thailand
Vipassana Meditation Centers United Kingdom - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in Europe " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Centers listed in directory: France, Germany, Italy, United Kingdom
Vipassana Meditation Centers USA - - 4
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in North America " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Centers listed in directory: Massachusetts; California; Texas; Pacific Northwest (Ethel, Wash); British Columbia, Canada
Vipassana Meditation Centers Washington - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation "; web page: "Vipassana Meditation Centers in North America " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Centers listed in directory: Massachusetts; California; Texas; Pacific Northwest (Ethel, Wash); British Columbia, Canada
Vipassana Meditation Centers world - - 51
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Vipassana Meditation " home page (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) "There are numerous [26] Centers in India and Southern Asia [10]; 5 Centers in North America; 4 Centers in Europe; 5 Centers in Australia/New Zealand; and 1 Center in Japan. Each Center maintains its own schedule of regular ten day Vipassana courses. In addition, ten day courses are frequently held at other locations outside of Centers as they are arranged by local students of Vipassana in those areas. "
Visigoth Spain - - - - 450 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 325. "Arianism. Arius (c. 256-366)... Vandals in North Africa, Visigoths in Spain and lower Gaul, Ostrogoths in Italy were Arians. "
Vlach Roma Quebec: Montreal - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 316, 318. "Location: Dispersed population in Europe; parts of Asia, North, Central and South America, Australia, New Zealand, North & Central Africa, the Middle East, and elsewhere; Population: 6 - 10 million (estimate); Religion: An underlay of Hinduism with an overlay of either Christianity or Islam (host country religion) "; "Roma religious beliefs are rooted in Hinduism. Roma believe in a universal balance, called kuntari... In Canada, at Sainte Anne de Beaupre, in Quebec, there is a shrine where Roma of the Vlach Roma group make annual pilgrimages late in July during the Novena... The ceremonies the Roma perform differ radically from those of non-Roma Catholics, who also attend in large numbers. "
Vlinblindingue Haiti - - - - 1936 Davis, Wade. The Serpent and the Rainbow. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 210. "A member of the mulatto elite... told Hurston: 'We have a society that is detestable to all the people of Haiti. It is known as the Sect Rouge, Vinbrindingue and Cochons gris and all these names mean one and the same thing... "
Vlinblindingue Haiti - - - - 1976 Davis, Wade. The Serpent and the Rainbow. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 211-212. "Haitian anthropologist... Michel Laguerre... 1976 [met] peasants who had been invited to join secret societies, [but later] converted to Protestantism & hence were willing to talk. There were... secret societies in all parts of the country, & each one maintained control of a specified territory. Names varied from region to region but included Zobop, Bizango, Vlinblindingue, San Poel, Mandingue, &... Macandal... quasi-political arm of the vodoun society charged above all with the protection of the community... "
Vlinblindingue Haiti - - - - 1985 Davis, Wade. The Serpent and the Rainbow. New York: Simon & Schuster (1985); pg. 273. "Vlinblindingue: A name of a secret society (also vinbringingue). "
Vodoun Benin 3,460,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; listed as: "Voodoo (traditional beliefs) "
Vodoun Dominican Republic 60,000 0.77% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 161-163. "Location: Dominican Republic...; Population: 7.8 million in the Dominican Republic "; "Followers of spirit worship and Voodoo (introduced into the country by Haitian immigrants) are thought to number about 60,000. "
Vodoun Haiti - - - - 1979 Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: Operation World 1979; URL: http://www.calebproject.org/nance/n577.htm; viewed Aug. 1998. Haiti profile now no longer online at the site: http://www.calebproject.org/) Roman Catholicism 70%, the state religion, but considerable compromised by close contacts with Voodooism. Voodooism is really the national religion -- an outgrowth of African spiritism and witchcraft.
Vodoun Haiti - - - - 1988 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Latin America 1988 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 105. "Religion: Officially, Roman Catholic Christianity, but a majority of Haitians practice Voodoo, a variety of animism similar to African native religions, but with a greater emphasis on mysticism. "
Vodoun Haiti - - - - 1989 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Est. 6.1 million [total pop.] (1989). Roman Catholicism official religion according to 1860 Concordat with Vatican. Voodoo more widely practiced than Catholicism and could be considered national religion.
Vodoun Haiti - - - - 1993 Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 2. "Yoruba religion also entered Haiti to compose there, along with Kongo-Angolan and Dahomeyan practices, the kaleidoscope that is the religion of Vodun. "
Vodoun Haiti - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 358. "But in the Caribbean and South America, where slave owners were mainly Catholic, the religion of the slaves retained much more of their African ancestral beliefs, concealed by or integrated with those of the slavemasters. The most widespread and influential of these religions--sometimes called diasporan in reference to the forced Diaspora of the Jews from their homeland--are Vodou in Haiti, Candomble in Brazil, and Santeria in Cuba. "
Vodoun Haiti 5,930,100 90.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 215, 219. "Location: Haiti; Population: 6,589,000 "; "Religion is an integral part of Haitian life and culture. Vodou (a mixture of African animism and Christianity, also known as Voodoo) and Roman Catholicism are the two main religions. Over 90% of Haitians participate in Vodou religion. Because Vodou is nonexclusive, 80% of Haitians are also Roman Catholic, and Protestants of various denominations account for the other 20%, many of whom do not generally participate in Vodou. All three religious sectors are organized at the national level and are officially organized. "
Vodoun world 50,000,000 - - - 1979 Davis, Rod. American Voudou: Journey Into A Hidden World. Denton, Texas: University of North Texas Press (1998); pg. 7. "It will certainly change the shape of American culture well into the next century, as population increases among the developing nations in which voudou variations may, by some estimates, involve up to fifty million adherents (Gert Chesi, Voodoo, 1979). "
Vodoun world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 799. "Voodoo... religion of African origin practiced by autonomous cult groups. Voodoo is one of a number of Afro-American religions which have preserved African religious traditions within a Western setting. The religion developed largely from Dahoman sources, incorporating elements from other West African traditions, as well as elements of Catholicism. The major centers of Voodoo practice have been located in Haiti... before spreading via emigration to Cuba and finally to New Orleans. Similar religious systems can be found in other areas which had West African slave populations, particularly Brazil. "
Vodoun world 60,000,000 - - - 1991 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (also: Voodoo, Sevi Lwa)
Vodoun world - - - - 1998 Davis, Rod. American Voudou: Journey Into A Hidden World. Denton, Texas: University of North Texas Press (1998); pg. 9. "In different areas, voudou has different rituals and doctrines, running a sectarian range roughly comparable to that from Judaism through Protestantism to Catholicism. In Haiti, the religion metamorphosed into vodun or vaudoux; in Cuba, santeria, in Brazil, candomble; in Trinidad, Shango Baptist; in Mexico, curanderismo; in Jamaica, obeah. In the American South, it became voodoo and, in the most extreme caricature, hoodoo... "
Vodoun world 50,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web page: "An Introduction to Vodun " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999); "Last revised 2/22/98 " Worldwide, vodun has fifty-million followers.
Voice of the Nazarene Assocation of Churches world - - 8
units
- 1967 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Glenn Griffith Movement; pg. 228. "Voice of the Nazarene Assocation of Churches... It is strongly opposed to Communism, the National Council of Churches, and the Roman Catholic Church. Membership: Not reported. In 1967 there were 8 member congregations (plus 18 cooperating congregations) and 31 Association evangelists. "
Volunteer Rescue Army Illinois: Chicago - - - - 1913 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 115. "1913... A.E. Kimball... wrote [about] 'present difficulty we have in connection with so many Armies.'... Chicago produced the Redeemer's Army, the Christian Army, and the Samaritan, Saved, and Volunteer Rescue Armies. These agencies, which used uniforms, flags, and brass bands wherever they could muster them, caused great confusion to the public, who naturally mistook them for The Salvation Army... "
Volunteers of America Maryland: Baltimore - - - - 1915 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 115. "In December 1913, Brigadier A.E. Kimball... wrote in despair to the national chief secretary, pleading for 'some way out of the present difficulty we have in connection with so many Armies.'... In Baltimore there were the American Rescue Workers and the Volunteers of America -- both of which were legitimate concerns, descendant from the Army schisms of 1884 and 1896... "
Volunteers of America USA - - 400
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 248. "Volunteers of America (VOA) is a Christian church and social-welfare organization... Today VOA is one of the nation's largest multipurpose human-care agencies, offering more than 400 programs in 200 communities across the U.S... "
Volunteers of America world - - 104
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 816. "Volunteers of America: A religious and philanthropic organization founded in 1896 by Ballington Booth... [split from Salvation Army]... 104 stations or mission posts. "
Wa China - - - - 1999 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 82. "The Yi (also called the Lolo) live in Sichuan and Yunan provinces. They are farmers and herders, and their language and customs are related to those of the Tibetans. Less easily absorbed are the Wa, a small but distinctive population along the border of Myanmar. The Wa are related to the tribespeople of Myanmar. They live in small villages in the jungle-covered mountains and maintain a traditional way of life based on hunting. "
Wa Myanmar - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 712. "The Wa of northern Burma took heads which they placed on gates entering their villages. The ghosts of those whose heads were taken were believed to serve as guardians of the community... "
Wa Myanmar 900,000 2.00% - - 1997 Leibo, Steven A. East, Southeast Asia, and the Western Pacific 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 91. "Population: 45 million... Ethnic Background:...Wa (2%), a very primitive group along the Chinese border... "
Waco North America - Southern Great Plains 350 - - - 1824 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Waco world 350 - - - 1824 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 333. Table: "Southern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wahhabi Sunni Arabia - - - - 1792 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 436. "The most reactionary of all major Muslim sects, the Wahhabis refuse any innovation in Quranic law. The movement was begun in 18th-century Arabia by Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab (1703-92), a Hanbalite who recognized only the Quran and sunna as authoritative in determining Muslim law. Like the Protestant Reformers, he favored predestination over the concept of earning salvation by good works... "
Wahhabi Sunni Asia - - - - 1799 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 800. "Dar'iya soon became a theocratic state and the center of an increasingly vast territory. Ibn Sa'u's able son, Abd al-'Aziz, continued military conquests, with Ibn 'Abd al-Wahhab as religious guide. After the reormer's death the fortunes of the Sa'udi dynasty continued to advance. It's territorial dominion eventually included all of the Hejaz and Najd, and much of the rest of the Arabian Peninsula from the Red Sea to the Persian Gulf. The Wahhabis even went beyond Arabia in attacks on Damascus in Syria and Najaf in Iraq. Later there was a significant branch of the movement in India. "
Wahhabi Sunni Middle East - - - - 1925 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 436. "The Wahhabis expanded into Iraq and Syria until, in 1925, King Ibn Saud, descended from the Saudi family that had been consolidating power since the 18th century, captured the holy cities of Mecca and Medina and most of the Arabian peninsula. The Wahhabis rule Saudi Arabia today by the strict Hanbalite code... "
Wahhabi Sunni Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 224. "Wahhabis: A conservative Sunni Muslim sect founded in the Arabian peninsula in the second half of the 18th century. It emphasizes the oneness of God, and accepts only what is written in the Koran and the early scriptures. Veneration of saints, luxuries, and decoration of moseques are banned. With Ibn Saud's conquest of the Nejd and the Arabian peninsula early in the 20th century, Wahhabism was formally established in the area, but in practice some of its edicts were modified. "
Wahhabi Sunni Qatar - - - - 1992 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Islam:Sunni:Wahhabi:
484,387 [total pop.] (1992). Most Qataris follow Wahhabi interpretation of Sunni Islam. Of remaining Muslims, Arabs, Pakistanis, and Afghans are Sunni, while Iranians are mainly Shia. Other religious groups include Hindus (mostly Indian) and Christians.
Wahhabi Sunni Qatar - - - - 1997 Augustin, Byron & Rebecca A. Augustin. Qatar (series: Enchantment of the World). New York: Children's Press (1997); pg. 86. "In the life of a Qatari citizen, religion is more important than any other factor. Almost all Qataris are followers of the Wahhabit branch of the Sunni sect of Islam. "
Wahhabi Sunni Qatar - - - - 1997 Augustin, Byron & Rebecca A. Augustin. Qatar (series: Enchantment of the World). New York: Children's Press (1997); pg. 37-38. "Sheikh Qasim... converted to the conservative branch of Islam, known as Wahhabit, in his later years. Most Qataris followed him in his conversion, and today Qatar is principally a Wahhabi-Islamic society. "
Wahhabi Sunni Qatar - native 100,000 100.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 646-647. "There are only about 100,000 native-born Qataris. Most people in Qatar live in the cities... "; Pg. 647: "At least 95% of the total population of Qatar is Islamic, and native-born Qataris are 100% Sunni Muslims of the Wahhabi sect. Wahhabis are a fundamentalist and puritanical branch of Islam which is prevalent in Saudi Arabia. A somewhat more moderate form is found in Qatar. "
Wahhabi Sunni Saudi Arabia - - - - 1818 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 800. "The nineteenth century brought reversals to the Sa'ud dynasty, and Ottoman punitive expeditions, under Egyptian command, finally overthrew the first Wahhabi empire in 1818. "
Wahhabi Sunni Saudi Arabia - - - - 1930 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 800. "...early in the present century the Sa'udi's regained their old position under the great 'Abd al'Aziz II, who was crowned king of Hejaz and Najd in 1930. His descendants continue to rule th modern kingdom of Saudi Arabia. "
Wahhabi Sunni Saudi Arabia - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 800. "Wahhabiya. A highly conservative reform movement founded in eighteenth century Arabia by Muhammad Ibn 'Abd al-Wahhab (1703-92)... accepted by the tribal chief Muhammad Ibn Sa'ud of nearby Dar'iya. Religious authority was assumed by Ibn 'Abd al-Wahhab, political and military power by Ibn Sa'ud. This venture determined the future of the movement, which has continued to the present day as a powerful relgio-political combination in Arabia, where the Sa'ud dynasty and Wahhabi fundamentalism dominate absolutely. "
Wahhabi Sunni Saudi Arabia 11,685,000 95.00% - - 1992 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Islam:Sunni:Wahhabi:
"1992: 16.9 million, of whom 12.3 million Saudi nationals, 4.6 million resident foreigners. Strict Wahhabi interpretation of Sunni Islam, the official faith of about 95 percent of Saudis. Remainder are Shia. Public worship by non-Muslims prohibited. "
Wahhabi Sunni USA - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 436. "The Wahhabi influence in American mosques is disproportionately strong, backed by generous Saudi funding, and its narrow interpretations may be pushing American Islam in an extremely conservative direction. "
Wahhabi Sunni world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "WAHHBIS: an eighteenth century REVITALIZATION MOVEMENT in ISLAM owing its origin to Muhammad Abd al-Wahhb... In 1902 Ibn Sa'd, captured Ryad and the HOLY cities of MECCA and MEDINA and in 1925 established a Wahhbi dynasty in Arabia. "
Wailaki North America - Pacific Coast 1,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wailaki world 1,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Wake Forest Baptist Church North Carolina - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Stack, Peggy Fletcher ( "compiler "). "World View... ", subhead: "Baptist Church Breaks Away " in Salt Lake Tribune (March 20, 1999), viewed online 21 March 1999. [Orig. source: Associated Press] "A Baptist congregation in North Carolina has decided to sever ties with the Southern Baptist Convention after years of unhappiness over the denomination's increasingly conservative policies. In a letter sent to the convention, leaders of Wake Forest Baptist Church in Winston-Salem said they were unhappy over the church's stand on women in ministry, targeting Jews and Mormons for evangelism, a literal [inerrant] interpretation of the Bible... "
Waktu Lima Indonesia: Lombok - - - - 1925 *LINK* Cederroth, Sven. "From Ancestor Worship to Monotheism: Politics of Religion in Lombok " in Temenos 32 (1996), 7-36. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999). "In the early decades of the 20th century, waktu lima had spread to most villages in Central Lombok, while the south and the north were still overwhelmingly wetu telu. "
Waktu Lima Indonesia: Lombok - - - - 1996 *LINK* Cederroth, Sven. "From Ancestor Worship to Monotheism: Politics of Religion in Lombok " in Temenos 32 (1996), 7-36. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999). "The island of Lombok is the home of the Sasak people, most of whom are now orthodox Muslims and as such adherents of the waktu lima sect. "
Waktu Lima Indonesia: Lombok - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 672-673. "Most Sasak adhere to Islam, introduced from Java... There is a cleavage between syncretists who combine Islamic and pre-Islamic beliefs and practices, and purists wh conform more strictly to Islamic orthodoxy. The former are referred to as Wetu Telu ('Three Time') Muslims, and the latter as Wetu Lima ('Five Time') Muslims... Due to persecution during the upheavals of 1965-66, exact figure for the Wetu Telu population are elusive; they may number as much as 30% of Lombok's inhabitants and are concentrated in the mountainous northern part of the island... Wetu Lima Muslims, the minority, follow Islamic orthodoxy, such as the five daily prayers... The organization Nahdatul Wahtan has been active since independence in combating Wetu Telu. "


Waktu Lima, continued

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