Adherents.com Home Page

Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Urantia Book Readers, Fellowship of, Zambia

Urantia Book Readers, Fellowship of, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Ute Colorado 2,500 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 69. "Ute... Numbering 4,500 in 1845, today the population is about 2,500 in Colorado. "
Ute North America 4,500 - - - 1845 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 69. "Ute... Numbering 4,500 in 1845, today the population is about 2,500 in Colorado. "
Ute North America - Great Basin 4,500 - - - 1845 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 389. Table: "The Great Basin: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Ute USA 7,273 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Ute world 4,500 - - - 1845 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 389. Table: "The Great Basin: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Utilitarianism United Kingdom: England - - - - 1850 Osborne, Richard. Philosophy for Beginners. New York, NY: Writers and Readers Publishing (1992); pg. 131. "Back in England, where empiricism and a profound disinterest in European philosophy were rife, the effect of Hegel was practically nil. Instead, what was being developed was that peculiarly English common-sense philosophy: utilitarianism. It dominated the thinking of most Englishmen for most of the 19th century. One critic said that utilitarianism was no more than empiricism attempting to hold off the 20th century by imitating the 18th, whatever that means... Utilitarianism holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness... By happiness is intended pleasure & the absence of pain. By unhappiness, pain & the privation of pleasure. "
Uwaysi world - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Naqshbandi.net "; web page: "A 30-Second Guide to Sufi Orders Found in North America " (viewed 10 Feb. 1999). [Orig. source: GNOSIS Magazine #30 (Winter 1994)] "Uwaysi (founder: Uways al-Qarani [7th century]). A tendency mainly found in Iran, the Uwaysi follow inner links to Uways al-Qarani, a contemporary of the Prophet, rather than a formal tariqa. An Uwaysi tendency founded by Mir Qutb al-Din Muhammad Angha in the early 20th century and formalized by his son, Shah Maghsoud Sadegh Angha, has spread to the West. "
Uygur China - - - - 1984 McLenighan, Valjean. China (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1984); pg. 117. "The Uighurs, though not strict in the practice of their religion, maintain contact with the rest of the Muslim world. They consider getting married and raising a family to be a religious duty. The Uighurs live by intensive farming. "
Uygur China 7,018,000 0.58% - - 1996 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 8-9. "Population: 1,210,000,000 (1996)... Ethnic Groups: Han Chinese, 92%; Zhuang, 1.33%; Mancu, .75%; Hui, .67%; Miao, .67%; Uygur, .58%; Yi, .57%; Tibetan, .42%; Mongol, .42% "; Pg. 81: "The Uygurs are also Muslims. They live in the Tarim and Junggar basins in the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region. Their language belongs to the Turkic language family of Central Asia rather than to the Chinese language family. The Uygurs are traditionally tent dwellers and camel herders, but today many of them live in modern housing in settled oasis communities, where they have begun to practice gardening and small-scale farming. "
Uygur China: Xinjiang 7,200,000 45.00% - - 1994 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "East Turkistan " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "According to official Chinese statistics 1996, the population of Eastern Turkestan is approximately 16 million, of which the Uighurs number, the indigenous people of Eastern Turkestan, are 7.2 million and the Chineses number is 6.4 million. "
Uygur China: Xinjiang 1,152,000 7.20% - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "East Turkestan is situated in Central Asia, between Mongolia and Tibet. East Turkestan is, since 1949, the Chinese autonomous region Xinjiang, but is lacking actual self-government. 7.2% of the 16 million inhabitants are Uigurs, the indigenous people of East Turkestan. The influx of the Chinese has made the Uigurs a minority and the opposition between the Uigurs and the Chinese are at times violent. Another problem is the nuclear testing China is conducting in East Turkestan, against the will of the Uigurs. "
Uygur China: Xinjiang - 45.00% - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 41. "In the autonomous region of Xinjiang, Uighurs remain the largest existing ethnic group, but make up only 45 percent of the population. "
Vadagalai India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 715. "Sri Vaisnava. A South Indian theistic sect... sectarian division between the 'Southern (Tengali) and the 'Northern' (Vadagalai) schools... [Vadagalai] stresses the Sanskritic or Vedic and has in practice little involvement with non-Brahmins. "
Vadagalai India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 780. "Vadagalai (Tamil & Skt.; lit. 'northern or Sanskrit literature and culture'...). The 'Northern School,' a Sri Vaisnava subsect stressing its Sanskritic, Vedic, or Brahmanical heritage relatively more than its 'Southern' or Tamil elements... "
Vadgalai India - - - - 1130 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "VADGALAI: followers of RAMUNUJA who emphasized that human effort is the condition of divine GRACE. Their view became known as the 'Monkey Principle' from the fact that a young monkey clings to its mother as she moves about. Thus it is through striving for SALVATION and by fulfillment of VEDIC religious duties that one attains LIBERATION. "
Vai Liberia - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Vai Sierra Leone - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Vai world - - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; "Liberia, Sierra Leone "
Vailala Papua New Guinea - - - - 1919 Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe. "Religion " in The Future Now: Predicting the 21st Century. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (1998); pg. 64. "The 'Vailala madness' first struck Papua in [1919], when ancestor-spirits prophesied a paradoxical paradise: wealth in shiploads of European cargo for those who rejected Western ways. A similar cargo-cult on Vanuatu... "
Vaisesika India - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "VAISESIKA: one of the six schools of HINDU PHILOSOPHY which expounded an atomistic interpretation of the UNIVERSE. Around the tenth century it merged with the NYYA School to promote a FORM of THEISM based on METAPHYSICS and taught that GOD is the BEING who combines and separates the atoms of the universe. "
Vaishnavism India - - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973); pg. 165. "Vaishnavas, followers of the Hindu god Vishnu, forming one of the main branches of Hinduism. Vaishnava sects and their temples are found in all parts of India. "
Vaishnavism India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 781. "Vaisnavism... Religious groups and theologies having as deity one or another of Vishnu's avatars... These groups may be found in all parts of India... "; Pg. 782: "Although the initial wide-ranging enthusiasm which surrounded early Vaisnavism has died out in most parts of India over the centuries, Vaisnavism remains one of the most powerful forces in the religious and intellectual life of that part of the world. "
Vaishnavism India - - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 194. "There are many different Vaishnava groups all over India. Some of the major ones are the Shrivaishnavas and Dvaitins of southern India, the followers of Vallabha in western India, and several groups following the teaching of Chaitanya in Bengal. The groups in the south mostly worship Vishnu, Rama or Vishnu's consort, whereas the groups in the north usually worship Krishna. "
Vaishnavism India - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "VAISNAVISM: the [worship] of VISHNU which emphasizes BHAKTI and the WORSHIP of GODS like KRISHNA. It is credited with producing the BHAGAVAD-GITA and an extensive devotional literature rich in MYTH and SYMBOLISM. Its chief rival in the HINDU TRADITION is SAIVISM which arose around the same period of time--300 B.C. to 300 A.D. "
Vaishnavism India - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 54. "The largest modern Hindu sect, Vaishnavism, prevailed in the north of India (although today members of the three major sects mostly live side by side)... The sect spread to the south after the 11th century... "
Vaishnavism world 546,382,912 9.56% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Hinduism:Vaishnavite:
"Hindus. 70% Vaishnavites, 25% Shaivites, 2% new-Hindus and reform Hindus. " Hinduism world total: 780,547,000. Total world population: 5,716,425,000.
Vaishnavism world 555,152,512 9.56% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Hinduism:Vaishnavite:
"Hindus. 70% Vaishnavites, 25% Shaivites, 2% new-Hindus and reform Hindus. " Hinduism world total: 793,075,000. Total world population: 5,716,425,000.
Vaishnavism world - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 93-94. "Banias: Alternate Names: Vania; Location: India (Rajasthan, Gujarat, and Maharashtra states); Singapore; Malaysia; Fiji; Hong Kong; elsewhere in the Middle East; Population: 45-55 million "; "The term [Banias] is widely used to identify members of the traditional mercantile or business castes of India... "; "Hindu Banias are almost exclusively Vaishnavas, i.e., they worship the god Vishnu. "
Vaisya India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 782. "Vaisya. A generic term for members of the third division of traditional Hindu society. Initially Vaisyas were traders and husbandmen, but today most do not engage in agricultural work, though they may own land or be involved in commerce and banking. Like Brahmins and Ksatriyas, the Vaisyas are among the Twice Born castes, and they tend to be strict in the observance of caste rules and dietary prescriptions. Hence, vegetarianism is a hallmark of the majority of Vaisyas. "
Vaisya India - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "VAISYA: the lowest of the three TWICE BORN within the CASTE system of HINDUISM. They are the acceptable workers, traders and merchants and from whose labors the members of the other castes live. "
Vajradhatu world 5,500 - - - 1993 *LINK* Religious Requirements & Practices of Certain Selected Groups: A Handbook for Chaplains (1993) - (online ed. - 1998); contract #: MDA903-90-C-0062 w/ Dept. of Defense; J. Gordon Melton, Project Director & James Lewis. Nat'l Headquarters: Boulder, CO... International HQ: Halifax, N.S... "MEMBERSHIP: Approx. 5,500 worldwide. HISTORICAL ORIGIN: Vajradhatu, the largest of the several Tibetan Buddhist groups in the U.S., is a representative of the Kagyupa sect founded by Lama Mar pa of Lhagyupa in the eleventh century... Vajradhatu was created as an umbrella organization in 1973. "
Vajrayana Buddhism Tibet - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "VAJRAYNA: the final phase in the development of Indian MAHYNA BUDDHISM... It was eventually carried to Tibet where it became the dominant FORM of Buddhism. "
Vajrayana Buddhism world - - - - 500 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 391. "Vajrayana - Skt., lit. 'Diamond Vehicle'; a school of Buddhism that rose, primarily in northeast and northwest India, around the middle of the first millenium. It developed out of the teachings of the Mahayana and reached Tibet, China, and Japan from Central Asia and India along with the Mahayana... These teachings became firmly established as part of Buddhims around the time it was being transmitted to Tibet... "
Vajrayana Buddhism world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 782. "Vajrayana (H & B -- Skt.; lit. 'thunderbolt or diamond vehicle'). A label for a North Indian school of Tantrism of the sixth century A.D. and for one form of Tibetan Buddhism that arose in the seventh century... Tantrayana and Mantrayana are alternative names for Vajrayana. "
Vajrayana Buddhism world 10,000,000 - - - 1984 Cousins, L. S. "Buddhism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 279, 335. "Northern Buddhism, current in Tibet, Mongolia, Himalayas, parts of China & USSR... with perhaps 10 million adherents... Tibetans sometimes argue that their teaching includes all three vehicles: Hinayana, Mahayana & Vajrayana. "
Vajrayana Buddhism world - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 50. "Today Hinayana Buddhism of the Theravada school is to be found in Ceylon (Sri Lanka), Thailand, Burma, & Cambodia; Mahayana in China, Japan, Vietnam, and Korea; Vajrayana in Tibet, Mongolia, and Japan. "
Vajrayana Buddhism world 10,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance "Northern Buddhism has perhaps 10 million adherents in parts of China, Mongolia, Russia and Tibet. " [NOTE: I've seen "Northern Buddhism " used to describe, as here, the third Lamaistic/Tantric/Vajrayana school. But I've also seen "Northern Buddhism " used to refer to Mahayana. So I'm listing it under "Vajrayana " here.]
Valentinians world - - - - 150 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 277. "Gnosticism... In addition to numerous scattered groups, two main schools of systematic Gnostic thought seem to have existed in the second century--the Basilideans and the Valentinians, the latter divided into Eastern and Western branches. "
Vallabhacharya world - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 93-94. "Banias: Alternate Names: Vania; Location: India (Rajasthan, Gujarat, and Maharashtra states); Singapore; Malaysia; Fiji; Hong Kong; elsewhere in the Middle East; Population: 45-55 million "; "The term [Banias] is widely used to identify members of the traditional mercantile or business castes of India... "; "Hindu Banias are almost exclusively Vaishnavas, i.e., they worship the god Vishnu. Most follow the Vallabhacharya sect of Hinduism, in which Krishna (an incarnation of Vishnu) is seen as the supreme deity. This sect is also known as pushti-marga ('abundance way')... "
Valley Cathedral Church Arizona: Phoenix 2,500 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. -
Valley of the Dawn Brazil - - - - 1997 Heinrichs, Ann. Brazil ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997); pg. 98. "In a suburb of Brasilia live several thousand people who expect to survive the end of the world. They belong to a religious movement called the Valley of the Dawn. Their community, with its huge temple, is also named the Valley of the Dawn. A retired truck driver named Aunt Neiva founded the sect in 1959. She taught that a lot of ordinary people are mediums--people who can communicate with the spirit world. Mediums are easily to spot in the Valley of the Dawn--male mediums wear black shirts and the women wear long robes with star-shaped sequins. Aunt Neiva also predicted that the world would end at the end of the millennium and that only a chosen few would survive. Residents of the Valley believe they are among the chosen. Hundreds of worshipers come into town for Sunday services. They, too, hope to prevail beyond the last days. "
Vamamargis India - - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 24. "Besides the major Hindu sects of Vishnu and Shiva, there are many minor ones. The strongest, in numbers and influence, is... of Shakti whose followers worship 'God in the aspect of mother.'... divided into two main groups, the Dakshinamargis, or followers of the right-hand way, and Vamamargis, or left-handed worshipers. The first take the usual path of renunciation of the world, the second the unusual path toward enjoyment of life. The Dakshinamargis do openly what they profess, the Vamamargis keep their rituals secret. "
Vamamargis India: West Bengal - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 53-54. "In Shaktism or Tantrism... Some of these texts relate esoteric practices divided into Vamachara, or left-handed path, and Dakshinachara, or right-handed path... to experience the Ultimate Reality by following the Vamachara practices, shaktas indulge in the Five M's: madya (alchohol), mamsa (meat), matsya (fish), mudra..., and maithuna (sexual intercourse either with one's spouse or promiscuously)... some Tantric groups still practice Vamachara in Bengal (although, of necessity, they remain secret). "
vampire USA 300 - - - 1989 Ramsland, Katherine. "Hunger for the Marvelous: The Vampire Craze in the Computer Age " in Psychology Today (Nov. 1989); pg. 34. "Stephen Kaplan, director of the Vampire Research Center since 1972, has been counting vampires systematically since his first census in 1981. For the 1989 census, he sent a 99-item questionnaire to people who had contacted him... Kaplan puts his vampires in 3 categories: 1) fetishists...; 2) vampire imitators...; 3) true vampires... Kaplan counts at least 50 true vampires in the U.S. now & estimates that there are 300 or more vampires of all kinds in the U.S. and 500 worldwide. "
vampire world 500 - - - 1989 Ramsland, Katherine. "Hunger for the Marvelous: The Vampire Craze in the Computer Age " in Psychology Today (Nov. 1989); pg. 34. "Stephen Kaplan, director of the Vampire Research Center since 1972, has been counting vampires systematically since his first census in 1981. For the 1989 census, he sent a 99-item questionnaire to people who had contacted him... Kaplan puts his vampires in 3 categories: 1) fetishists...; 2) vampire imitators...; 3) true vampires... Kaplan counts at least 50 true vampires in the U.S. now & estimates that there are 300 or more vampires of all kinds in the U.S. and 500 worldwide. "
vampire - true USA 50 - - - 1989 Ramsland, Katherine. "Hunger for the Marvelous: The Vampire Craze in the Computer Age " in Psychology Today (Nov. 1989); pg. 34. "Stephen Kaplan, director of the Vampire Research Center since 1972, has been counting vampires systematically since his first census in 1981. For the 1989 census, he sent a 99-item questionnaire to people who had contacted him... Kaplan puts his vampires in 3 categories: 1) fetishists...; 2) vampire imitators...; 3) true vampires... Kaplan counts at least 50 true vampires in the U.S. now & estimates that there are 300 or more vampires of all kinds in the U.S. and 500 worldwide. "
Vandal Africa - North - - - - 450 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 325. "Arianism. Arius (c. 256-366)... Vandals in North Africa, Visigoths in Spain and lower Gaul, Ostrogoths in Italy were Arians. "
Vatsiputriya Buddhism world - - - - -280 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 151. "From the Sthaviras, the first sects appear to be the Pudgalavadin group [i.e. 'Vatsiputriya'] (around 280 B.C.)... "
Vatsiputriya Buddhism world - - - - -240 B.C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 129. "The Hinayana enumerates the traditions of 18 schools that developed out of the original community... the Vatsiputriyas (also called Pudgalavadins) separated themselves from the Sthaviras around 240 B.C.E. The Vatsiputriya had 4 subdivisions: Dharmottariya, Bhadrayaniya, Sammatiya, and Sannagarika (or Sandagiriya). "
Vatsiputriya Buddhism world - - - - -200 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 150. "Buddhist Sectarianism... By around 200 B.C., a movement began... referred to itself as Mahayana... while branding the earlier Buddhist sects, which included primarily the Sthaviras, Mahasanghikas, Pudgalavadins [i.e. 'Vatsiputriya'], and Theravadins as Hinayana... "
Vaupes Colombia - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 434. "Vaupes: Location: Colombia (along the Vaupes River); Language: A variety of Amerindian or mixed langauges and dialects, including Tukano and Lingua Geral; Spanish; Portuguese; Religion: Indigenous beliefs... The vaupes Indians of Colombia comprise several major tribes, including the Caribes, the Cubeos, the Uananas, the Karapanas, the Tucanos, and the Macus. Another tribe, the Arawaks, live further north along the Isana river. "
Vedanta Societies Australia - - 7
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The Ramakrishna Vedanta Society of Victoria, was established in Melbourne in 1975 on the Vedantic Philosophy of Ramakrishna Math (Monastry) and Ramakrishna Mission, which was founded in Calcutta, India in 1897 by the famous Hindu Monk, Swami Vivekananda. The exact date of the Ramakrishna Vedanta Movement in Australia is unknown. The first European woman devotee came to Australia in the middle of 1897. In the late 1920's more members of the Vedanta movement arrived and since then the movement has continued in Australia. The Vedanta Movement now has seven centres in Australia... "
Vedanta Societies Canada - - 1
unit
- 1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 140. "There are 13 such Centers in the United States and one in Canada. All are under the spiritual guidance of the Ramakrishna Mission, organized by Swami Vivekananda in India. "
Vedanta Societies North America - - 14
units
- 1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 140. "There are 13 such Centers in the United States and one in Canada. All are under the spiritual guidance of the Ramakrishna Mission, organized by Swami Vivekananda in India. "
Vedanta Societies USA - - - - 1897 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 318. "Vivekananda's Ramakrishna Mission (named after his well-known teacher) and his Vedanta Societies, established in 1897, grew rapidly in both India and America; they appealed to an educated and liberal following, including the philosopher and writer Aldous Huxley. "
Vedanta Societies USA - - 15
units
- 1969 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 208. "In 1969 the activities of the Vedanta Societies were carried on in eleven Vedanta Centers, scattered from San Francisco to Boston, in two monastaries, and two convents under the direction of 20 ordained monks of the Rakrishna Order. "
Vedanta Societies USA 2,500 - 13
units
- 1988 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Vedanta Societies. "
Vedanta Societies USA 1,600 - 13
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 247-248. "There are 13 Vedanta centers, three monasteries, and two convents in the U.S.; all are under the management of the Ramakrishna Math and Mission founded by Swami Vivekananda, with headquarters in Belur Math, near Calcutta... There are 1,600 members, about half in the West Coast states. "
Vedanta Societies USA - - 13
units
- 1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 140. "There are 13 such Centers in the United States and one in Canada. All are under the spiritual guidance of the Ramakrishna Mission, organized by Swami Vivekananda in India. "
Vedanta Societies USA - - 13
units
- 1998 *LINK* web site: "New Religious Movements " (University of Virginia); web page: "Ramakrishna Order of the Vedanta Society " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Anne Oelrich For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " [Orig. source: "What is Vedanta " by Vedanta Society of Southern California. Essay on home page of Vedanta Page.] "Size of Group: There are presently thirteen Vedanta Societies in the U.S., and 125 centers governed by the Ramakrishna Order. There are more than 1,000 additional centers that claim the name of either Ramakrishna or Vivekananda. "
Vedanta Societies USA - - 13
units
- 1998 *LINK* web site: "Vedanta Page "; web page: "Vedanta - What is Vedanta " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); Reprinted from "What is Vedanta " by Vedanta Society of Southern California. "There are 13 Vedanta Societies in the United States and 125 Centers in the world managed by the Ramakrishna Order. Over 1,000 more centers bear the names of Ramakrishna and Vivekananda. "
Vedanta Societies USA 3,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998); "last updated October 1998 " Table: "'Other Than Christian' Organizations "; "Some of the following data were estimated from North American figures: "
Vedanta Societies world - except India - - 20
units
- 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 286. "The monks of the Ramakrishna order visit other countries... Usually Vedanta centers or societies spring up around these monks; at present there are aproximately twenty such organizations outside India. "
Veddas Sri Lanka 15,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 801. "Veddas: Alternate Names: Veddhas, Veddahs; Vanniyalato; Location: Sri Lanka; Population: 13,000-15,000; Religion: Traditional religion with elements of Buddhism and Hinduism. "; "The veddas... are a small tribal community in Sri Lanka, the former island... "; "As far as can be determined, the primitive religion of the Veddas was based on spirits (yakku) rather than of any gods... Prolonged contact with Tamil and Sinhalese society has resulted in many Vedda groups absorbing elements of Hinduism and, especially, Buddhism. These groups worship gods as well as spirits... "
Vedic astrologers - full-time USA 50 - - - 1998 *LINK* "Mystic Arts " in Hinduism Today International, Nov. 1998. "Their numbers are not known; guesses range from fifty to several hundred, if priests practicing part-time are included. Serious, full-time American Vedic astrologers probably number about 50 [&] several hundred more are capable amateurs. "


Vedic astrologers - full-time, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus

Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.