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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Tu, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Tuareg Africa 1,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 432-433. "Tuaregs: Location: Saharan and Sahelian Africa (mostly Niger, Mali, Algeria, Libya, and Burkina Faso); Population: About 1 million; Language: Tamacheq; Religion: Islam, combined with traditional beliefs and practices "; "The Tuareg, a seminomadic, Islamic people, are best-known for their men's practice of veiling the face with a blue, indigo-dyed cloth. Hence, early travel accounts often referred to them as 'the Blue Men' of the Sahara Desert... "; Pg. 433: "Most Tuareg are Muslim, adhering to Islam. But their pre-Islamic belief system, with its own worldview and rituals, interweaves and overlaps with official Islam.. "
Tuareg world 300,000 - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 24. "The Tuareg are a white-skinned peple whose home is the middle Sahara and its southern fringe. They are believed to be the descendents of Berber immigrants, who were forced to embrace a nomadic life in the Sahara when they were displaced by the Bedouin Arabs in the eleventh century. There are now about 300,000 Tuareg, and small numbers of them are scattered over all parts of the desert. Most of the Tuareg, howeer, no longer live in the Sahara proper, but have settled in the Sudan and Air regions on the outskirts of the desert. "
Tuareg world 400,000 - - 3
countries
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 152-156. "Tuareg: Population: 400,000; Location: Algeria, Mali, and Niger; Languages: Tamahaq, Arabic "; Pg. 154: "Although they retain some vestiges of their earlier Christian faith--their favorite decorative motif is the cross--for the most part, the Tuareg have abandoned their ancestral way of life and have adopted that of the Muslims. "; Pg. 156: "Unlike other Muslim peoples, the Tuareg men take just one wife... "
Tubatulabal North America - Pacific Coast 1,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Tubatulabal world 1,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Tubu Niger - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Tugen Kenya - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Tujia China 5,720,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 780. "Tujia: Alternate Names: Bizika, Turan, and Tuming; Location: China; Population: 5.72 million; Religion: Polytheism and ancestor worship "; "The Tujia population amounted to 5.72 million in 1990. They dwell mainly in a vast area at the juncture of Hunan, Hubei, Sichuan, and Guizbou provinces. "
Tuken Kenya - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Tukuler Senegal 756,000 9.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 59. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Tukulor Mauritania - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Tukulor Senegal - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Tukulor world - - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; "Senegal, Mauritania "
Tunica North America - Southeastern Woodlands 2,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Yazoo tribe.
Tunica world 2,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Yazoo tribe.
Tupi Brazil - - 2
units
1
country
1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 205, 210. "...the country of the Rio Xingu, a major waterway that rises in the sandstone plateaus of Brazil and flows northward to the might Amazon... "; Pg. 210: "Anthropologist Kalervo Oberg was one of the fortunate few to gain a permit to study the Xingu tribes. Working with the Smithsonian Institution, he entered the area in the late 1940's and emerged some months later with a report that is still the main source of our knowledge about the Indians. While studying all four of the language groups in the area--the Carib, the Arawak, the Tupi, and the Trumai--Oberg concentrated intensively on a single village, that of the Camayura, one of the two Tupi-speaking groups in the area. "
Tupinamba Brazil - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "
Turk Bulgaria 1,000,000 11.28% - - 1992 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 245. "There are about a million ethnic Turks in the country [Bulgaria], about 800,000 of whom are Moslem. "
Turk Macedonia 77,455 4.00% - - 1994 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 370-371. "Macedonia... Population: 1,936,377 (July 1994)... Other minorities include Turks (4%), Romanies (Gypsies, 2.3%), and Serbs (2%). "
Turkana Kenya - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Turkish Orthodox Church USA - - 14
units
- 1967 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 74. -
Turkish Orthodox Church USA - - 14
units
- 1969 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 135. "Turkish Orthodox Church... Membership: In 1969 the church reported 14 churches and 6 mission parishes. "
Turkish Orthodox Church USA - - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 135. "Turkish Orthodox Church... Membership: In 1969 the church reported 14 churches and 6 mission parishes. Remarks: The Turkish Orthodox Church continued to exist throughout the 1970s but during the early 1980s, Archbishop Cragg moved to Chicago and opened a health clinic. His stationary carried the title, American Orthodox Church, Diocese of Chicago and North America. "
Turkomans Afghanistan 1,450,000 10.00% - - 1989 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Afghanistan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1989); pg. 40, 42. "About 14.5 million people live in Afghanistan... "; Pg. 42: "Turkomans and Uzbek [ethnic groups]--whose territories Afghanistan and the Soviet Union share--live in the north. The Turkic language they speak is not related to the Indo-European family, and these groups represent less than 10% of Afghanistan's population. Most of these Turkic-speakers are farmers, although some have moved to urban centers, where they can find better schools and higher-paying jobs. "
Turkomans Iraq - - - - 1990 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Iraq ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1990); pg. 40. "Iraq's population of 18.1 million people includes several ethnic groups. Arabs make up about 75% of the total, and Kurds--the largest non-Arab group--compose about 20%. Small numbers of Turkomans, Assyrians, Armenians, and Iranians also live in Iraq. "
Turkomans Iraq 2,500,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "There are between 2 and 2.5 million Turkomans in Iraq. Most of them live in the northern and central parts. They have, historically, constituted a border between the Arabs in the south and the Kurds to the north. Since the Gulf War, when a demilitarised zone for the Kurds was established in the northern part of Iraq, the Turkoman population has been geographically separated. The Turkomans have suffered greatly from the fighting in the Kurd dominated areas. "
Turkomans Jordan - - - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999); pg. 67. "The North Jordan Valley contains a small community of Turkomans and Bahais, who moved from Iran to Jordan in 1910. They settle don land in Jordan that was bought in 1879 by Abdul Baha Abbas, the leader of the Bahia Faith. "
Tuscarora North America 3,245 - - - 1991 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 252. "The total population of Iroquois today is over 60,000 (according to the US Census of 1990 and Canadian Census of 1991). " Table showing tribes of the Iroquois nation (Mohawk, Oneida, Seneca, Tuscarora, Onondaga, Cayaga), and population of the tribe. [NOTE: This is a measure of tribal affiiation. Most Iroquois today are Christian.]
Tuscarora North America - Southeastern Woodlands 5,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Tuscarora world 5,000 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Tutsi Africa - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 443, 445. "Tutsi: Location: Rwanda, Burundi, northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire); Population: About Approximately 13 million; Religion: Christianity (with aspects of traditional belief) "; Pg. 445: "Most people in modern-day Rwanda and Burundi are Christians, but aspects of traditional belief survive. " [NOTE: This statistic is a measure of tribal/ethnic affiliation and not how many people practice traditional Tutsi religion.]
Tutsi Burundi 560,000 16.00% - - 1973 Carpenter, Allan & Matthew Maginnis. Burundi (series: Enchantment of Africa). Chicago: Childrens Press (1973); pg. 90. "Total Population - 3,500,000... Population Distribution (by ethnic group): Hutu: 83%; Tutsi: 16%; Twa: less than 1%; Foreigners: less than .5% "
Tutsi Burundi 826,000 14.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 86. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Tutsi Rwanda 1,022,000 14.00% - - 1993 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Batwa (Rwanda) " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "Before the genocide and war of 1994, there were 7.3 million inhabitants in Rwanda?the Hutu and Tutsi comprised 85% and 14% respectively of the total population. "
Tutsi Rwanda 711,000 9.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 89. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Tutsi world 690,000 - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 158, 161. "Tutsi: Population: 690,000; Location: Rwanda and Burundi; Languages: Rwand and Rundi; Pg. 161: "The religious practices of the Tutsi are a combination of Christianity, which was adopted during colonial times, and old Bantu customs. They believe in several gods and in spirits of the dead... "
Tuvans Russia 235,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 383, 385. "Tuvans: Location: Russia (southern Siberia); Population: 235,000; Religions: Shamanism; Buddhism "; "The ancient religion of the Tuvans is shamanism... The Tibetan variety of Buddhism was brought to Tuva by Mongolian lamas... during the 18th century & soon claimed many converts. Instead of abandoning shamanism, however, the Tuvans continued to practice it along with the new religion... During the 1930s, the Tuvan government... destroyed the monasteries & imprisoned or killed many Tuvan lamas & shamans. Tuvan religious practiced emerged from underground in the 1980s when the [Gorbachev] put an end to the Soviet government's war on religion. Since then, several young Tuvans have gone to Mongolia's buddhist monasteries for religious training, & Tuvan Buddhists have made plans to rebuild some of the destroyed monasteries. "
Tuvans Russia: Tuva 300,700 97.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Tuva " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The republic of Tuva lies at the upper reaches of the Siberian Yenisey river. Population: Of the population of approximately 310,000 people 97% are Tuvans. Other Tuvans live in Mongolia and the Peoples Republic of China. Tuvans are one of the oldest peoples to inhabit Central Asia with a unique culture. The mixture of cultural roots of ancient Tuvans, Uigurs and Kyrgyzians formed a the basis of the culture of the present-day. "
Twa Burundi 35,000 1.00% - - 1973 Carpenter, Allan & Matthew Maginnis. Burundi (series: Enchantment of Africa). Chicago: Childrens Press (1973); pg. 90. "Total Population - 3,500,000... Population Distribution (by ethnic group): Hutu: 83%; Tutsi: 16%; Twa: less than 1%; Foreigners: less than .5% "
Twa Burundi - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Twa Burundi 59,000 1.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 86. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.; "Twa, or Pygmies (1%) "
Twa Rwanda 29,000 - - - 1993 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "Before the genocide in 1994 the 29,000 Twas were disbursed all over [Rwanda], often in the outskirts of the Hutu and Tutsi villages. "
Twa Rwanda 20,000 0.40% - - 1994 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Batwa (Rwanda) " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "BATWA (RWANDA)... Batwa is situated in Central East Africa. In the north Rwanda borders Uganda, in the east Tanzania, in the west Dem. Rep. Congo and in the south Burundi... The Batwa are indigenous inhabitant of Rwanda. The present Batwa population, based on a provisional census carried out by UNPO in late 1994, is between 10,000 - 20,000. Ethnic Diversity: Before the genocide and war of 1994, there were 7.3 million inhabitants in Rwanda. The Batwa made up 0.4%, some 20,000 people, the Hutu and Tutsi comprised 85% and 14% respectively of the total population. Languages: Like all Rwandans, the Batwa speak Kinyarwanda. Organisations: The Association for the Promotion of Batwa (APB) represents the Batwa population in UNPO. The Community of Indigenous People of Rwanda (CAURWA) is uniting three existing Batwa organisations, including APB. "
Twa Rwanda - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Twa Rwanda 39,500 0.50% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 89. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.; "Twa, or Pygmies (1%) "
Twa Rwanda 10,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "Only about 10,000 Twa remain today. It is estimated that about ten thousand Twas were killed and the same number is living as refugees. "
Twa Rwanda - 0.40% - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "The Twa People, sometimes also called the Batwa People, are pygmies and the indigenous population of Rwanda. They constitute only 0.4 % of the population of Rwanda. "
Twelvers Afghanistan - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 16-17. "Afghanistan is one of the most solidly Muslim countries in the world... About 10-20% of Afghanis are Shi'ah Muslims, of both the Imami and Ismaili sects. "
Twelvers Bahrain - 51.00% - - 1993 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993); pg. 5. "The largest Shi'ite roup, known as the Imamis or Ithna 'Asharis ('Twelvers')... constitute most of present-day Iran, over half of Bahrain & Iraq, large minorities in Kuwait, Suadi Arabia, & Dubai... "
Twelvers Iran 7,000,000 - - - 1969 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969); pg. 469. "In Iran, where some seven million Twelvers live... "
Twelvers Iraq - - - - 1736 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 434. "By the 16th century, Twelver doctrine became the state religion of Persia, and under the Safavidts (1502-1736), two horses were kept saddled and ready at all times, pending the return of the Mahdi and Jesus? "
Twelvers Iraq - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1469. "The Imamites, the main body of the Shia, believe in 12 imams, the first being Ali... At its opening early this century the first parliament in Persia was said to be held under the auspices of the hidden imam. "
Twelvers Iraq - 51.00% - - 1993 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993); pg. 5. "The largest Shi'ite roup, known as the Imamis or Ithna 'Asharis ('Twelvers')... constitute most of present-day Iran, over half of Bahrain & Iraq, large minorities in Kuwait, Suadi Arabia, & Dubai... "
Twelvers Lebanon - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 434. "In Syria and Lebanon, Twelvers are called Matawila ('friends of Ali'), and in Yemen, Zaydites (after a great-grandson of Ali). "
Twelvers Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 219. "Ithna'asharis (Twelvers): The largest Shiite school. It acknowledges a succession of 12 Imams. Ithna'asharis believe that Muhammad publicly designated Ali ibn Abi Talib, his cousin and the husband of his daughter, Fatima, to succeed him. Ithna'asharis believe that the community, in rejecting Ali, committed an act of infidelity. Ithna'asharis believe that each Imam designated his successor until the last known one, Muhammad al-Mahdi, the twlfth in line, who disappeared in 878. They believe he is still alive and will reappear as the Mahdi, a messiah, before the Day of Judgement... After the disappearance... Shiites in Iraq were protected by the Byuids (932-1066)... 'Twelver' Shiism is prominent today in Iran, southern Iraq, southern Lebanon, eastern Arabia, India and Pakistan. "
Twelvers Syria - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 434. "In Syria and Lebanon, Twelvers are called Matawila ('friends of Ali'), and in Yemen, Zaydites (after a great-grandson of Ali). "
Twelvers world - - - - 765 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 433. "In 765, the Shiites split into two sects, the Seveners and the Twelvers (Ithna Asharis or Imami). The moderate Twelvers supported Ali and his 11 directly hereditary successors, imputing to them doctrinal infallibility?Today they embrace the concept of the 12th Imam, based on the historical figure known as Muhammad al-Muntazar ('the Expected')... "
Twelvers world - - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973); pg. 139. "Imamis, the greatest body of Shiites in the 20th century, form the majority of the population of Iran, in both Iranian and Soviet Azerbaidzhan, and southern Iraq, and important minorities in eastern Arabi, northern Syria, northern India, and the Indian Deccan. "
Twelvers world - - - - 1993 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993); pg. 5. "The largest Shi'ite roup, known as the Imamis or Ithna 'Asharis ('Twelvers')... constitute most of present-day Iran, over half of Bahrain & Iraq, large minorities in Kuwait, Suadi Arabia, & Dubai, and significant groups in Lebanon, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Pakistan, India & the Asian republics of the former Soviet Union. "
Twelvers Yemen - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 434. "In Syria and Lebanon, Twelvers are called Matawila ('friends of Ali'), and in Yemen, Zaydites (after a great-grandson of Ali). "
Twi Ghana - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Two-by-Twos world 600,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* OPPOSING VIEW (anti-) web site: "Telling the Truth " (Oklahoma City, OK); "FACT SHEET For The Church Without A Name " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999) Census: No census records of membership available. Member estimates range between 250,000 and 600,000 worldwide. In 1987-88, the USA and Canada listed a total of 1,071 workers. Outreach: Worldwide, except Arab countries.
Two-by-Twos world 150,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Workers, Friends and THE CHURCH WITHOUT A NAME Home Page "; "This site is offered by: VOT [Veterans of Truth]; "This site was last updated on January 23, 1999 "; web page: "Government of this Secretive Group " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999) CENSUS: No census records of membership are available and attempts to estimate the numbers have varied from 35,000 to 600,00 worldwide. [Recent attempts to determine the numbers have indicated 50,000 to 150,000 worldwide.]
Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit Predestinarian Baptists Indiana 24 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 20. [Listed as 'Two-Seed-In-The-Spirit Predestinarian Baptists.']
Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit Predestinarian Baptists Tennessee 10 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 08. [Listed as 'Two-Seed-In-The-Spirit Predestinarian Baptists.']


Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit Predestinarian Baptists, continued

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