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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Theosophical Society, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Theosophical Society (Hartley) world - - 5
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 34. "Headquarters of the Theosophical Society (Hartley) are located in Gravenhage, the Netherlands, at the Blavatskyhuis; it has five lodges. "
Theosophical Society International USA - - 75
units
- 1894 Sellon, Emily B. & Renee Weber. "Theosophy and the Theosophical Society " in Modern Esoteric Spirituality (vol. 21 of "World Spirituality: An Encyclopedic History of the Religious Quest "), edited by Antoine Faivre and Jacob Needleman. New York, NY: Crossroad (1992); pg. 316-318. "Upon Blavatsky's death... a schism within the society in 1894. Seventy-five of the American branches seceded from the parent society and formed a new organization under the leadership of Judge. " [Judge died within a year and was replaced by Katherine Tingley; the org. was eventually headquartered at Point Loma, California.]; pg. 318: "The second largest group is the Theosophical Society International (now in Pasadena--formerly in Point Loma)... "
Theosophical Society International world - - 75
units
1
country
1894 Sellon, Emily B. & Renee Weber. "Theosophy and the Theosophical Society " in Modern Esoteric Spirituality (vol. 21 of "World Spirituality: An Encyclopedic History of the Religious Quest "), edited by Antoine Faivre and Jacob Needleman. New York, NY: Crossroad (1992); pg. 316-318. "Upon Blavatsky's death... a schism within the society in 1894. Seventy-five of the American branches seceded from the parent society and formed a new organization under the leadership of Judge. " [Judge died within a year and was replaced by Katherine Tingley; the org. was eventually headquartered at Point Loma, California.]; pg. 318: "The second largest group is the Theosophical Society International (now in Pasadena--formerly in Point Loma)... "
Theosophical Society International world 1,500 - - - 1992 Sellon, Emily B. & Renee Weber. "Theosophy and the Theosophical Society " in Modern Esoteric Spirituality (vol. 21 of "World Spirituality: An Encyclopedic History of the Religious Quest "), edited by Antoine Faivre and Jacob Needleman. New York, NY: Crossroad (1992); pg. 318. "The second largest group is the Theosophical Society International (now in Pasadena--formerly in Point Loma), which has a worldwide membership of about fifteen hundred with headquarters in Altadena, California. "
Theosophy Australia 1,423 0.01% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census.
Theosophy Poland - - - - 1992 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 243-244. "In Poland he found (Maxwell, 1992:37) the following NRMs: 22 Zen Buddhist organizations; 13 Hindu orgs.; 2 Theosophical orgs; Hawaiian Kahuna, a magic movement; Ordo Lux, a Pagan occult movement; 2 esoteric Yoga groups; a Sikh group; a Bahai' group; a Rastafarian gorup. " [these are number of organizations, not necessarily be number of "units "]
Theosophy United Kingdom: Britain 1,200 - - - 1999 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... Theosophy: Britain: Theosophical Society (1999) about 1,000, plus 200 in other Theosophical groups (Tingay's estimate)... "
Theosophy USA 5,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 230. "No accurate report of membership seems possible among these groups, but it is estimated that there are some 40,000 Theosophists worldwide, perhaps 5,000 in the United States. "
Theosophy USA 5,000 - - - 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). "40,000 Theosophists worldwide, perhaps 5,000 in the U.S. "
Theosophy world 40,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 230. "No accurate report of membership seems possible among these groups, but it is estimated that there are some 40,000 Theosophists worldwide, perhaps 5,000 in the United States. "
Theosophy world 37,700 - - - 1992 Sellon, Emily B. & Renee Weber. "Theosophy and the Theosophical Society " in Modern Esoteric Spirituality (vol. 21 of "World Spirituality: An Encyclopedic History of the Religious Quest "), edited by Antoine Faivre and Jacob Needleman. New York, NY: Crossroad (1992); pg. 318. "The Theosophical Society, whose international headquarters are at Adya..., now has a membership of around 35,000... The 2nd largest group is the Theosophical Society International..., which has a worldwide membership of about 1,500... The United Lodge of Theosophists has about 1,200 associates... " [Membership of these 3 groups adds up to 37,700, which would be a minimal number of Theosophists worldwide.]
Theosophy world 40,000 - - - 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). "40,000 Theosophists worldwide, perhaps 5,000 in the U.S. "
Theosophy world - - - 10
countries
1998 *LINK* official organization web page Counted national sections listed on web page
Theravada Buddhism Asia - - - - -200 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 299. "Hinayana. The pejorative name applied to all the early schools of Buddhism by an emergen, radical group (ca. 200 B.C.) which referred to itself as Mahayana (lit. 'large vehicle...'). Hinayana thus became a general designation for the two major early schools of Buddhism, the Sthaviras and Mahasanghikas, and their subschools (including the Theravadins). "
Theravada Buddhism Asia - - - - 1966 Welty, Paul Thomas. The Asians: Their Heritage and Their Destiny (Revised Edition). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (1966); pg. 72. "Hinayana... is sometimes referred to as Southern Buddhism because it is stressed in Ceylon, Burma, and Thailand. Southern Buddhists prefer to use the term Theravada instead of Hinayana... "
Theravada Buddhism Asia - Southeast - - - - 1966 Welty, Paul Thomas. The Asians: Their Heritage and Their Destiny (Revised Edition). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (1966); pg. 291, 295. "The religion of the vast majority of people in the countries of Burma, Cambodia, and Laos is Buddhism in the form called Theravada... "; Pg. 295: "The only word that properly describes the role of Buddhism in the countries of Burma, Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand is pervasive. There is no aspect of a person's life in these countries which is not affected by Buddhism... "
Theravada Buddhism Cambodia 6,800,000 85.00% - - 1975 The Peoples and Cultures of Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam, Washington, D.C.: Center for Applied Linguistics/Language and Orientation Resource Center (1981); pg. 15, 18. Pg. 15: "The population of Cambodia was estimated at 7.1 million in 1972 and 8 million in 1975. "; pg. 18: "Theravada Buddhism has been the official religion in Cambodia and is followed by nearly 85% of the population. "
Theravada Buddhism Cambodia - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 51. "The first inscription in Pali is from the yar 1309; it makes clear that the Theravada was under the protection of the royal house. Since that time it has been the dominant form of Buddhism in Cambodia. Toward the end of the 19th century the Dhammayut school of Thailand gained a foothold in Cambodia. "
Theravada Buddhism Cambodia 7,300,000 - - - 1987 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies In 1987 estimates vary from 6.3 to 7.3 million [total pop.]. Religion: Theravada Buddhism, suppressed by Khmer Rouge, revived but controlled under successor regime.
Theravada Buddhism Cambodia 10,605,668 95.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Theravada Buddhism 95%, other 5%; Total population: 11,163,861.
Theravada Buddhism Cambodia 8,550,000 95.00% - - 1998 *LINK* tourism page: "Cambodia - A Hidden Kingdom " [Jason's Domicile] RELIGION: Theravada Buddhism (official religion) : 95% of population Muslims : 500,000; Christians : 60,000 ; POPULATION Total: Approximately 9 million
Theravada Buddhism China - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 45. "Today there are Buddhists among the Han Chinese, the Mongols, Tibetans, Manchus, Tu, Qiang and Dai (Hinayana Buddhists) peoples. "
Theravada Buddhism Laos 3,610,000 95.00% - - 1988 Diamond, Judith. Laos (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1989); pg. 120. "Population: Estimated 1988 population - 3,800,000... Religion: About 95% of the people adhere to Therevada Buddhism. Animism is practiced among the Lao Theng, and 1.5% are Christian. "
Theravada Buddhism Laos - - - - 1994 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies 1994 approximately 4.7 million [total pop.]. Provision for religious freedom in constitution; almost all Laotians Buddhist. Theravada Buddhism predominant among Lao Loum and some Lao Theung; animist beliefs widespread.
Theravada Buddhism Malaysia - - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Malaysia Homepage " (Mimos Berhad); section: "Malaysia Religion "; web page: "Buddhism " (viewed 15 April 1999). "(C) 1997 MIMOS Berhad " [Orig. source: The Information Malaysia Yearbook (1996)] "Most non-Chinese Buddhists follow the Theravada School. It is practised by the Malaysian-Thais to be found particularly in the border states of Kelantan, Kedah and Perlis which have been subject to Thai infiltration over the past three centuries. There are numerous Thai Buddhist temples, monasteries and other foundations in Kelantan The extremely beautiful Wat Putharamaran at Repek, Pasir Mas, Kelantan is the administrative centre of Thai Buddhism in that state. Kedah also boasts a good number of Thai temples and institutions and Alor Setar is the natural centre. There are also a number of Thai Buddhist temples in Perlis and important temples in Kuala Lumpur, Pulau Pinang, Ipoh and Taiping as well. "
Theravada Buddhism Myanmar - - - - 1050 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 50-51. "After the 5th century, there is evidence of a flourishing Buddhist life in Burma. Activity of the Theravada and that of another school (probably the Sarvastivada)... can be documented. In the 7th century both Hinayana and Mahayana (especially in the north) coexisted. In the following century, Buddhist Tantrism penetrated Burma. In the 11th century the entire country was converted to Theravada under the rule of King Anaratha. This spelled the end of Mahayana in Burma. The Theravada gradually assimilated the indigenous folk belief in spirits called nats and gave it a Buddhist sense. "
Theravada Buddhism Myanmar - 80.00% - - 1988 Kusy, Frank & Frances Capel. Thailand & Burma; Chester, Connecticut: The Globe Pequot Press (1988); pg. 282. "80% of the Burmese people, including virtually all Burmans, are Theravada Buddhists... it is an integral part of its peoples' lives... You will find a Buddha room, or a shrine, or a simple Buddha image... in most Burmese homes. "
Theravada Buddhism Myanmar 34,000,000 85.00% - - 1990 Noss., David S. & John B. Noss. A History of the World's Religions. Macmillian (1990).; pg. 227-228. "Burma's recent population is etimated to be nearly forty million, approximately 85% Buddhist. About 5% could be described as animist, 4% Hindu, 4% Muslim and 2% Christian... The Burmese of today are profoundly Theravadin... "
Theravada Buddhism Myanmar 29,700,000 99.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 142-143. "Location: Myanmar; Population: 30 million; Religion: Theravada Buddhism "; "The Burmese people are close to 100% Theravada Buddhists... Burma has over one million Buddhist temples. "
Theravada Buddhism Sri Lanka 11,481,393 69.00% - - 1988 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Est. 16,639,695 [Total pop.] (1988). n: Theravada Buddhist, 69 percent; Hindu, 15 percent; Christian, 8 percent; Muslim, 8 percent
Theravada Buddhism Sri Lanka 12,489,000 69.00% - - 1995 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 706-707. "Location: Sri Lanka; Population: 18.1 million... (1995 estimate) "; Pg. 707: "Most, though not all, Sinhalese are Buddhists, who make up 69% of the population. Buddhism in Sri Lanka is of the southern type, Theravada Buddhism... The Buddhist Sangha, or order of monks, is an important element in Sri Lankan society. "
Theravada Buddhism Thailand - - - - 1987 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Est. 53 million [total pop.] (1987). Almost all core Thai, some other Tai speakers, Khmer, and Mon practice Theravada Buddhism. Islam represented chiefly among Malay. Christians found among hill peoples and Vietnamese.
Theravada Buddhism Thailand - 95.00% 28,000
units
- 1988 Kusy, Frank & Frances Capel. Thailand & Burma; Chester, Connecticut: The Globe Pequot Press (1988); pg. 38-39. "professed religion of 95% of Thais is Theravada Buddhism. The greatest of all Thai institutions... some 300,000 monks, novices and nuns currently support Thailand's 28,000 or so Buddhist temples. "
Theravada Buddhism world - - - - -200 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 150. "Buddhist Sectarianism... By around 200 B.C., a movement began... referred to itself as Mahayana... while branding the earlier Buddhist sects, which included primarily the Sthaviras, Mahasanghikas, Pudgalavadins, and Theravadins as Hinayana... "
Theravada Buddhism world - - - - -150 B.C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 129. "The Hinayana enumerates the traditions of 18 schools that developed out of the original community... Two other schools that splintered from the Sthaviras are the Sarvastivada, out of which, around 150 B.C.E., came the Sautrantikas, and the Vibhajyavadins, who see themselves as orthodox Sthaviras. Out of this last school arose the Theravada, Mahishasakas, and Kashyapiyas; from the Mahishasakas came the Dharmaguptakas. "
Theravada Buddhism world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 758. "Theravada. The sole remaining active member of the group of schools collectively referred to (by Mahayanists) as Hinayana. It flourishes today in Sri Lanka, Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia, and is the most widely researched of all the early schools of Buddhism. "
Theravada Buddhism world 100,000,000 - - - 1984 Cousins, L. S. "Buddhism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 279. "Theravada Buddhism, has about 100 million adherents, most of whom live in the five countries of Sri Lanka, Burma, Cambodia, Laos and Thailand. Smaller numbers are found in parts of Vietnam, Bangladesh and India, and as emigrants to the U.S.A. "
Theravada Buddhism world - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 50. "Today Hinayana Buddhism of the Theravada school is to be found in Ceylon (Sri Lanka), Thailand, Burma, & Cambodia; Mahayana in China, Japan, Vietnam, and Korea; Vajrayana in Tibet, Mongolia, and Japan. "
Theravada Buddhism world 126,920,000 2.28% - - 1993 *LINK* web page: "Buddhism Diverged "; web site: "Supporting Materials: Culture " (Slippery Rock Univ., PA). (viewed 31 Aug. 1999). Last Revised: 10-25-95. "Buddhism diverged... Theravada Buddhism (38%): periods of service, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia; Mahayana Buddhism (56%): personal meditation; China, Korea, Japan, Vietnam; Lamaism (6%): monasteries; Tibet. " [Other page this site indicates 334 million Buddhists, 6% of world pop., in 1993.]
Theravada Buddhism world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "THERAVADA BUDDHISM... dominant in Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand and Cambodia. "
Theravada Buddhism world 123,079,720 2.15% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. "Buddhists. 56% Mahayana, 38% Theravada (Hinayana), 6% Tantrayana (Lamaism). " Buddhism world total: 323,894,000. Total world population: 5,716,425,000.
Theravada Buddhism world 123,604,496 2.13% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. "Buddhists. 56% Mahayana, 38% Theravada (Hinayana), 6% Tantrayana (Lamaism). " Buddhism world total: 325,275,000. Total world population: 5,804,120,000.
Theravada Buddhism world 100,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance "Southern Buddhism (known as Theravada Buddhism) has 100 million followers, mainly in Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Sri Lanka and Thailand, and parts of Vietnam. It started in Sri Lanka when Buddhist missionaries arrived from India. "
Theravada Buddhism - monastic Myanmar 800,000 - - - 1988 Kusy, Frank & Frances Capel. Thailand & Burma; Chester, Connecticut: The Globe Pequot Press (1988); pg. 286. "Only about one eighth of the 800,000 monks--or pongyis--in Burma have dedicated their entire lives to monkhood. These have renounced the world and devote their time to meditation and teaching the scriptures. "
Theravada Buddhism - monastic Thailand 165,000 - - - 1969 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969); pg. 125. "This has meant governmental support, but often also a large measure of governmental control for the 165,000 [Theravada Buddhist] monks in 20,000 Thai monasteries. "
Theravada Buddhism - monastic Thailand 300,000 - - - 1988 Kusy, Frank & Frances Capel. Thailand & Burma; Chester, Connecticut: The Globe Pequot Press (1988); pg. 38-39. "professed religion of 95% of Thais is Theravada Buddhism. The greatest of all Thai institutions... some 300,000 monks, novices and nuns currently support Thailand's 28,000 or so Buddhist temples. "
Theravada Buddhism - occasional temple-goers Thailand - 20.00% - - 1988 Kusy, Frank & Frances Capel. Thailand & Burma; Chester, Connecticut: The Globe Pequot Press (1988); pg. 40. "Bangkok Post recently reported... survey of 20,000 families throughout the country showed that only 4.5% of those living in municipal areas went to Buddhist temples regularly...; 20% said they went occasionally; & 75% said not at all... "
Theravada Buddhism - regular temple-goers Thailand - 4.50% - - 1988 Kusy, Frank & Frances Capel. Thailand & Burma; Chester, Connecticut: The Globe Pequot Press (1988); pg. 40. "Bangkok Post recently reported... survey of 20,000 families throughout the country showed that only 4.5% of those living in municipal areas went to Buddhist temples regularly...; 20% said they went occasionally; & 75% said not at all... "
Theurgists Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1928. "During the Hellenistic period... very little is heard about Mysteries. But at the time of the Roman Empire such religions suddenly sprang up. The best-known are the Mysteries of Isis and Mithras. However, there were also groups... The fire cult of the theurgists had a Mystery character... theurgists had a sacred book, the Chaldean Oracles. "
Theurgists Roman Empire - - - - 50 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1928. "The various Mysteries appealed to sociologically different strata of society... theurgy was accessible only to a few philosophically educated people, being something quite exclusive. "
Third Century Publishers USA - - - - 1976 Diamong, Sara. Not by Politics Alone: The Enduring Influence of the Christian Right. New York: The Guilford Press (1998); pg. 61. "Unbeknownst to most Christians, by 1976, Bright and a handful of others were also working on a project called Third Century publishers. Their goal was to prompt born-again Christians to become active in politics during the United States' bicentennial anniversary year, and beyond. Third Century published manuals explaining how Christian leaders could begin to recruit people into home study groups, with an eye toward influencing Congressional races. "
Thompson North America 5,000 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 71. "Thompson. Their name was given to them by Europeans, referring to the Thompson River. The people called themselves ntlakyapamuk, meaning unknown... They inhabited the Thompson and Fraser River valleys, British Columbia... The Thompson were decimatd by an onslaught of miners into their territory in 1858 and by smallpox epidemics in subsequent years. The Thompson still live on narrow pieces of land in this vicinity. There may have been as many as 5,000 in 1780... "
Thompson North America 1,776 - - - 1906 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 71. "Thompson... They inhabited the Thompson and Fraser River valleys, British Columbia... The Thompson still live on narrow pieces of land in this vicinity. There may have been as many as 5,000 in 1780; they numbered 1,776 in 1906. "
Thugee India - - - - 1850 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1555. "Certainly the most ardent and extreme of Kali's worshippers were the members of the once widespread secret society called Thugs... terrorized the Indian highways for centuries... The practice of thuggee remained an accepted part of the dangers of travel in India into the 19th century. "
Thugee India - - - - 1850 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 24. "The lower classes, in their fear of the dreadful Kali, have sometimes gone to morbid extremes to please her. From the 13th to the 19th Centuries, devotees known as thugi, from which the English word thug comes, went around the countryside strangling human victims in the belief that a human sacrifice would satisfy Kali's thirst for blood for a thousand years. Even with approval of the Brahmans, who discouraged blood sacrifices, the British authorities had great difficulty in suppressing the thugi, and some Kali votaries still kill animals in her name. "
Thugee India - - - - 1875 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 759. "Thug. A member of a secret hereditary cult devoted to human sacrifice, which flourished in Northern and Central India from ancient times until the late nineteenth century. The thugs were devotees of the goddess Bhavani, a form of Kali... "
Tibetan Tibet 6,000,000 44.44% - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "Tibet has 13.5 million inhabitants, of which 6 millions are ethnic Tibetans. The majority of the population is Chinese settlers. Tibet was invaded by China in 1949 and is, since 1951 an autonomous region in the Peoples republic of China. The land area of Tibet is about the same as the one in the European Union. The predominant religion is Lamaism, a special form of Buddhism. The religious leader of Tibet, Dalai Lama, lives in exile in India but travels much of the time in order to gain international support for the Tibet's struggle for freedom. "
Tibetan Tibet - 98.00% - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 36. "Within China, only in Tibet is a natinoal minority group actually the majority, with 98 percent of the population. "
Tibetan Tibet 6,000,000 44.44% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Tibet " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "Tibet has an estimated population of about 6 million Tibetans and 7.5 million Chinese settlers. "
Tibetan Buddhism China 9,680,000 0.80% - - 1999 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 8-9, 82. "Population: 1,210,000,000 (1996)... Ethnic Groups: Han Chinese, 92%; Zhuang, 1.33%; Mancu, .75%; Hui, .67%; Miao, .67%; Uygur, .58%; Yi, .57%; Tibetan, .42%; Mongol, .42% "; Pg. 83: "The principal buildings throughout Tibet are Buddhist temples and monasteries because most Tibetans are Buddhists. The Mongolians also practice Tibetan Buddhism. Most Chinese Mongolians live in the Inner Mongolian autonomous region... "
Tibetan Buddhism India - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 12). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1589. "...the Dalai Lama; now in exile, he recently announced his intention of establishing a miniature Tibet in India for the preservation of his country's religion... "
Tibetan Buddhism Kansas: Wichita 12 - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Lewis, Brian. "Rise of Buddhism " in Wichita Eagle, 16 Oct. 1999 (v. online). "...in Wichita... two recent Buddhist groups have started and are attracting people who were not born in Buddhist cultures... Smith's Tibetan group has between six and 12 members. "
Tibetan Buddhism Mongolia - - - - 1989 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies 2,125,463 [total pop.] (1989). Predominantly Yellow Sect of Tibetan Buddhism (Lamaism); about 4 percent Muslim (primarily in southwest), some shamanism.
Tibetan Buddhism Mongolia - - - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 2,538,211. predominantly Tibetan Buddhist, Muslim 4% note: previously limited religious activity because of communist regime
Tibetan Buddhism Tibet - - - - 1419 C.E. Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 45. "In the seventh century AD, another type of Buddhism, called Tantric Buddhism or Lamaism, was introduced into Tibet from India. With the influence of the monk Padmasambhava, it replaced the indigenous Bon religion, while at the same time taking over some of the elements of this naturalist religion. The monasteries in Tibet developed into centers of intellectual and worldly power, yet there were recurring arguments. Only the reformer Tsongkhapa (1357-1419) succeeded in rectifying conditions that had become chaotic. "


Tibetan Buddhism, continued

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