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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

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Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Teda Chad - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Tehuelche Argentina - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "
Teisei Kyo Japan - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 136. "Sect Shinto consists of a wide range of sects with very different philosophies and practices. 13 are officially recognized, from the so-called pure sects of Shinto Honkyoku, Shinri Kyo, and Taisha Kyo to the overtly Confucian-influenced sects Shusei Ha and Teisei Kyo. "
Teke Congo, Republic of the (Brazzaville) 433,500 17.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 98. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.; Republic of Congo
Tekesta North America - Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps 1,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Tekesta (1650): 1,000 (?) "
Tekesta world 1,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Tekesta (1650): 1,000 (?) "
televangelism USA 13,500,000 - - - 1980 Diamong, Sara. Not by Politics Alone: The Enduring Influence of the Christian Right. New York: The Guilford Press (1998); pg. 22. "...in 1980, a coalition of groups that included evangelicals, mainline Protestant denominations, and Catholics, as well as the National Religious Broadcasters, jointly paid for a study... The research indicated that viewers of Christian TV tended to be active churchgoers and generous contributors to their churches. In other words, religious television was an adjunct to, not a substitute for, genuine church involvement... The overall audience size was estimated at about thirteen and a half million people who watched at least 15 minutes of Christian TV on a weekly basis. "
televangelism USA 20,000,000 - - - 1980 Fichter, Joseph. The Holy Family of Father Moon. Kansas City, MO: Leaven Press (1985); pg. 8. "The rising power of the televangelists is well documented by Jeffrey Hadden and Charles Swan, who reported that 66 syndicated programs in 1980 reached a combined audience of over 20,000,000 viewers. "
televangelism USA 13,000,000 - - - 1984 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 196. "By 1984, estimates of the total number of regular viewers of religious television programs were placed conservatively at approximately 13 million. "
televangelism USA - - - - 1987 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 279-280. "A 1987 poll showed 63 percent of Americans called TV evangelists 'untrustworthy,' while 23 percent voted them 'trustworthy.' Since the PTL, Swaggart, and Oral Roberts scandals, TV evangelists have lost a staggering amount of support. From February 1986 to July 1988 Jimmy Swaggart's viewers in the United States went from 2.3 million to 836,000, according to the Arbitron Ratings Company, while Jerry Falwell's dropped from 700,000 to 284,000. "
televangelism USA - 45.00% - - 1991 Wolfe, Alan. One Nation, After All: What Middle-Class Americans Really Think About.... New York, NY: Viking Penguin (1998); pg. 44-45. "...a 1991 study by Andrew Greeley... Americans... 51% claim to pray every day, and 45% watch or listen to religious programming on television or radio. "
televangelism USA 60,000,000 - - - 1994 Baines, John. The United States (series: Country Fact Files). Austin, Texas: Raintree Steck-Vaughn Publishers (1994); pg. 23. "Churches run 200 television stations and 3 networks, and their programs are seen by 60 million people a week. "
televangelism USA - - - - 1998 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 380. "Moreover, millions of Christians support television evangelists such as Jesse Duplantis, Joyce Meyer, Bishop T.D. Jakes, and Marilyn Hicks, each of whom heads a worldwide, multimillion-dollar operation regularly broadcast on local, national, and international cable stations. "
televangelism world - - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 279-280. "Fundamentalism's most visible strength is its effective use of the media, an outlandish, incongruous, perfect balance: the hard edge of technology in service to the high touch of religion.

- Before falling from grace, Jimmy Swaggart had broadcast in 140 countries weekly and in fifteen different languages. He claimed to reachone third of the planet. Jim and Tammy Bakker's PTL cable TV network reached 12 million households.

- Jerry Falwell's TV shows reached 610,000 households in 168 markets across the U.S.; his 1987 TV income: $91 million.

- Robert Schuller is the leading TV evangelist. his Crystal Cathedral claims 10,000 members; many more watch the show on TV. "

televangelism world 1,100,000,000 25.90% - 251
countries
1996 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page (1996 list): "Megatrend 6: Mushrooming of radio/TV Christianity " by Justin D. Long. (viewed 12 March 1999) "As 900 Christian broadcasting organizations their 100,000 full-time personnel... have an audience of 452 million regular listeners in 300 languages over Christian stations, with an additional 1.1 billion regular listeners over secular stations (in 3,400 languages & 251 countries). The total: 1.3 billion regular listeners, 25.9% of the world, in 3,500 languages... coverage to non-regular listeners is far more extensive: 4.6 billion can receive Christian broadcasting in their mother-tongue. 900 million Christians regularly listen to Christian radio & TV. Of these, 51 million are bedridden listeners, & 20 million are 'radio/TV believers'čthat is, they have no local church and depend on the broadcasts for discipleship, training and fellowship (4.7 million depending on radio alone). "
televangelism world - 26.00% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "Christian broadcasting " (1996 list); (viewed 10 March 1999), written by Justin D. Long circa 1996. "Today, every country, religion, confession and every large Christian denomination regularly uses it and even produces it. Some 26% of the world's population regularly listen to and/or view Christian programs. A third of these programs are distributed over Christian stations. Nevertheless, distribution of the entire range of Christian broadcasting is very uneven. Some 99.9% is directed at and benefits Christians only. "
Tembu Africa - South - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Teme Sierra Leone - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Templars Europe - - - - 1312 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 12). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1576. "In several European countries the Order was not rigorously persecuted and there were no general confessions; Clement had to issue another Bull to force Edward II of England to use torture on English Templars. In France the Inquisition attempted to force the truth from the Templars for nearly three years. Many died from their ordeals. In 1310 a number of knights came forward to defend the Order, and Philip, unwilling to risk doubt being thrown on the proceedings, had 54 Templars burned to death. All refused to confess. In 1312, the unhappy Clement... had to admit that there was not enough evidence to prove definite heresy. But the Templars' reputation was irretrievably damaged, and he dissolved the Order, stipulating that its funds be transferred to the Hospitallers, a rival crusading order. Templars who had not perished by fire or in jail were allowed to join another order or to revert to the secular state... In Spain, Portugal and Germany... the Order had suffered least... "
Templars Israel - - - - 1119 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 750. "Templars. The Poor Knights of Christ and the Temple of Solomon; a military religious order, originally housed near Solomon's Temple, founded in 1119 by Hugh de Payens, who vowed to protect pilgrims en route from the coast of Jerusalem. The order received vast holdings and established banking centers to support its enlarged purpose of defending the Holy Land. "
Templars world 9 - - - 1188 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 12). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1574. "Knights Templar. Idealism, chivalry and religious fervour inspired the Order of the Temple, founded c. 1188 by Hugh de Payens of Champagne, and eight companions. This militant fellowship of knights dedicated their lives and wealth to the defence of pilgrims and the route to the Holy Land; wish such idealistic aims, they could not have forseen that 250 years later the Templars' honour and renown wuld be destroyed by charges of heresy, unnatural vice and Devil-worship, levelled by a greedy and unscrupulous monarch, implemented by a timorous pope, and put to trial by the torturing hands of the Inquisition. "
Templars world - - - - 1290 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 12). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1574-1575. "Two factors distinguished the Templars from other monastic orders: their devotion to fighting, and the total secrecy surrounding all chapters, ceremonies and initiations... Despite differing language and nationality, the Templars became a closely-knit organization with branches throughout Europe. Only later did individual kings and prelates recognize the potential danger from this independent and strong body... So much confidence was placed in their complex of fortified estates like the Temples of London and Paris, that kings deposited their riches there for safekeeping. The last years of the 13th century witnessed the inglorious finale of the Crusades. The Templars were the last to leave the Holy Land, and their famous Castle Pilgrim between Haifa and Arsuf was the final Christian stronghold to fall. "
Templars world - - - - 1312 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "TEMPLARS: a MONASTIC Order of medieval knights founded in 1118 by Hugh de Payens to protect PILGRIMS visiting the HOLY LAND. They became very influential and wealthy and this led to rivalry with other Orders and eventually to charges of immorality and heresy and eventually suppression by King Phillip of France and the POPE in 1312. "
Temple of Set Australia - - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "While The Temple of Set as an organisation was formally incorporated in 1975 CE... [in California] " [This is a list of 'new' religious groups in Australia, though the text doesn't specifically mention the history of membership of this group in Australia.]
Temple of Set California - - - - 1975 Harvey, G. "Satanism in Britain Today " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 3, October 1995; pg. 285. "The Temple of Set (TS) is an international organisation which was incorporated as a non-profit Church in California in 1975, receiving state and federal recognition and tax-exemption later that year. "
Temple of Set United Kingdom 50 - - - 1995 Harvey, G. "Satanism in Britain Today " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 3, October 1995; pg. 285. "...Trevor Thomas of the TS... was concerned that I might be given false information regarding Satanism and the TS. After some correspondence the TS agreed (with some enthusiasm) to distribute a questionnaire specifically designed for its membership in Britain. Both the senior British TS initiate, David Austen, and the TS's High Priest, Michael Aquino, are said to have been keen that members responded to that questionnaire... I received 11 responses to the questionnaire... I was also able to interview David Austen, according to whom the TS has gained many more members since my questionnaire was distributed. If so, my respondents represent approximately twenty percent of the approximately 50 current UK members. (In turn, I estimate that this is about 50% of the Satanists in organized groups in Britain)... There are TS members in Cheshire, Yorkshire, and Lancashire (with 3 in Manchester), London, Essex and the Isle of Man. "
Temple of Set United Kingdom - - - - 1995 Harvey, G. "Satanism in Britain Today " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 3, October 1995; pg. 284. "...there are Satanists in Britain. There are six groups who between them have less than 100 members... Most of my discussion is devoted to the Temple of Set, numerically the largest group, which permitted me more access to their membership and literature than the other groups. I begin with the Temple of Set for those reasons alone and not because it is the 'most representative' or 'authentic' Satanist group in existence. "
Temple of Set world 2,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) Estimated to be around 2000.
Temple of the Vampire Australia - - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The Temple of the Vampire is the only Vampire religion federally-registered with the US government in the world today. The membership is international with a Priesthood dedicated to the service of Undead Gods Who rule this earth (not to be confused with non-physical entities or forces). Its primary focus is that of a unique religion which is devoted to enabling candidate humans to achieve the Vampiric Condition and to promote the spread of authentic Vampirism as it serves the desires of the Undead. " [This is a list of 'new' religious groups in Australia, though the text doesn't specifically mention the history of membership of this group in Australia.]
Temple of the Vampire world - - - - 1998 *LINK* web page: "Temple of the Vampire " (1998) "The Temple is the only authentic international church in the world devoted to and authorized by the Vampire religion, legally registered since December 1989 with the U.S. federal government. We have a worldwide membership and a dedicated Priesthood. We are a secret society in the sense that we maintain absolute confidentiality regarding our membership... "
Temple ov Psychick Youth United Kingdom: London - - - - 1993 "Information about Thee Temple ov Psychick Youth " tract (OPPOSING viewpoint). Published by INFORM (Information Network Focus on Religious Movements, supported by 'mainstream Churches' in U.K.), London, UK. "The London group has at present only twelve individuals who are actively involved, although it has been estimated that several hundred buy the Temple Bulletin. "
Temple ov Psychick Youth world - - - - 1993 "Information about Thee Temple ov Psychick Youth " tract (OPPOSING viewpoint). Published by INFORM (Information Network Focus on Religious Movements, supported by 'mainstream Churches' in U.K.), London, UK. "Thee Temple ov Psychick Youth (sic) is also called TOPY, or TOPYUK. Male members are called Eden and female members Kali. In the USA, male members are known as Koyotes. TOPY members say everyone is a member though they do not realise it... The movement sees itself as made up of individuals without a leader. When Genesis P Orridge left the pop group Throbbing Gristle in 1981, he began a new musical project called Psychic TV, and TOPY also came into existence. It used to be through the music of Psychic TV that people came to hear abot the movement whereas now it is mainly through magazines, exhibitions and art. Members stress that although Genesis used to be a central figure in TOPY, he is no longer connected... "
Temple ov Psychick Youth world - - - 4
countries
1993 "Information about Thee Temple ov Psychick Youth " tract (OPPOSING viewpoint). Published by INFORM (Information Network Focus on Religious Movements, supported by 'mainstream Churches' in U.K.), London, UK. "TOPY has more male than female members and the average age at present is 27. They are mainly caucasians and unmarried... They are working-class and middle-class... Affiliation seems to be fairly fluid, members losing contact as they grow older. TOPY currently has three 'Stations (Europe, UK, USA) and one main 'access' point in the UK in Sheffield... TOPY also exists in Germany and Sweden... As a matter of policy, TOPY has no structured organisation. There are no set rules, no official leaders... People working at the offices on a voluntary basis organise TOPY events and answer letters... "
Temple Riders USA 200 - - 1
country
1999 *LINK* Wolfson, Hannah (AP). "Mormons Ride Hogs, Hand Out Their Scripture " in Salt Lake Tribune, 3 July 1999 (viewed online 4 July 1999). "They don't drink, they don't smoke, and they carry extra copies of the Book of Mormon in their saddlebags. But the Temple Riders are as proud of their big bikes and black leather as any other motorcycle gang. Sure, most of the riders are Mormons, and many have been members of the faith's lay clergy. Yet they still log thousands of miles each year and attend the big biker rallies... There are about 95 bikes at the biggest meetings, almost all ridden by couples... About half of the planned rides include a visit to a Mormon temple... the Temple Riders -- who claim members in Idaho, Texas and California as well as all over Utah... "
Temple Society Australia 678 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Listed in table as "Temple Society "]
Tendai China - - - - 575 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 750. "Tendai (Jap.); T'ien-T'ai (Chin.). An academic school of Buddhism organized in sixth century China by Chih-I on T'ien-t'ai Shan ('Heavenly Terrace Mountain') and carried to Mount Hiei in Japan by the Japanese monk Saicho in the early ninth century. "
Tendai China - - - - 575 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "T'IEN-T'AI: an influential branch of Chinese BUDDHISM founded in the sixth century by CHIH-I which based its teachings on the LOTUS SUTRA and the teachings of NAGARJUNA who emphasized the totality of BEING thus identifying the parts with the whole. It declined as a result of persecution in the ninth century but not before it has spread its message to Korea and Japan. "
Tendai China - - - - 597 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 372-373. "T'ien-t'ai school - Chin., lit. 'School of the Celestial Platform'; school of Buddhism that received its definitive form Chih-i (538-97). Its doctrine is based on the Lotus Sutra, thus it is often called the Lotus school... The school was brought to Japan in the 9th century by Saicho, a student of the 10th patriarch, Tao-sui. There it is known under the name Tendai and is one of the most important Buddhist schools. "
Tendai China - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 752. "Tendai... The Contemporary scene. Buddhism in modern China has been largely eclectic, and so Tendai has continued to play a role, often in concert with Ch'an (Zen) practices. T'en-hsu, who founded several monasteries from 1921 to 1932, belonged to the Tendai set by Dharma lineage, and Ch'an by tonsure. The situation of Tendai, as of Buddhism generally under the communist government, is problematic, although visiting Japanese Buddhists have gone on pilgrimage in recent years to do homage to the mummified body of Chih-i on Mount T'ien-t'ai and have been impressed by the care given the site. "
Tendai Japan - - - - 805 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "TENDAI BUDDHISM: the leading Japanese school of BUDDHISM founded by Dengyo Daishi in 805, on the basis of the LOTUS SUTRA and centered on the Monastery at Mount Hiei near Kyoto, teaching that the historical BUDDHA is a manifestation of the eternal BUDDHA-NATURE which is the fundamental ESSENCE of the UNIVERSE. As a result the Buddha becomes an object of FAITH enabling individuals to realize their own ultimate Buddha-nature thus attaining ENLIGHTENMENT. "
Tendai Japan 101 - - - 807 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 750. "Tendai (Jap.); T'ien-T'ai (Chin.). An academic school of Buddhism organized in sixth century China by Chih-I on T'ien-t'ai Shan ('Heavenly Terrace Mountain') and carried to Mount Hiei in Japan by the Japanese monk Saicho in the early ninth century. "; Pg. 752: Saicho studied Tendai in China during the year 804 and, upon returning to Japan, introduced it at his temple, Enryakuji, on Mount Hiei. With the emperor's support, he ordained a hundred disciples in 807. Maintaining a strict discipline on Hiei, his monks lived in seclusion for twelve years of study and meditation. "
Tendai Japan - - - - 822 C.E. Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 200. "Tendai sect: The sect of Buddhism founded by Dengyo Daishi (Saicho). Based at Enryakuji on Mt. Hiei, it based its doctrine and eclectic practices including esoteric rituals on the Lotus sutra (hokkekyo). "
Tendai Japan - - - - 975 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 752. "In the tenth century, succession disputes between Tendai monks of the line of Ennin and Enchin (814-891) led to opposing Tendai centers at Mount Hiei, the sammon ('Mountain Order') and at Miidera, the jimon ('Church Order'). Warrior monks (sohei) were employed in such disputes, and Tendai leaders began to hire mercenary armies who threatened rivals and even marched on the capital to enforce monastic demands. Centuries later, in 1571, Shogun Nobunaga ended this Buddhist militancy by burning the temples on Mount Hiei and destroying the monastic communities. "
Tendai Japan 2,141,000 - 4,438
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 109. "In Japan, where it was founded in 804 by Dengyo Daishi (Saicho, 767-822), the School (Tendai) has three branches (Sammon, Jimon, and Shinsei) with 4,438 temples and 2,141,000 followers. "
Tendai Japan 750,000 - 4,000
units
- 1969 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969); pg. 272. "The Tendai Buddhism which Saicho founded continues as a living form in Japan today. Statistics for the period since World War II show some four thousand temples and 750,000 adherents. "
Tendai Japan - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 752. "Tendai... The Contemporary scene... In modern Japan, the 'new religions,' Jodo, Jodo Shin-shu, Nichiren sects, and Zen sects far outnumber Tendai in adherents, though mergers of Tendai groups have occurred with the hope for future revivals. In both China and Japan the chief contribution of Tendai has ben its impressive synthesis of Buddhist doctrines and its ability to provide the impetus for new and vital sects and movements. "
Tendai Japan 31,427,310 25.20% - - 1993 O'Brien, J. & M. Palmer. The State of Religion Atlas. Simon & Schuster: New York (1993); pg. 26-27. "Shares of Buddhist sect membership in Japan, 1981: Tendai: 30%; Nichiren: 30%; Pure Land: 18%; Shingon: 10%; Zen: 8%; Nara: 4%. " Percentages and numbers made using est. of 84% of Japan being Buddhist, total pop. of country: 124,711,551 (1993).
Tenetehara Brazil - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 415-416. "The Tenetehara are also known as Guajajara and Tembe when treated as two separate tribes. They seem to have inhabited the northeastern Brazilian region since pre-Columbian times... With the exception of culture heroes, Tenetehara supernatural beings are dangerous... Apart from the spirits, the Tenetehara also have to deal with ghosts (azang)... Because the supernatural world is so menacing, the Tenetehara need their shamans to protect them... "
Tengali India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 715. "Sri Vaisnava. A South Indian theistic sect... sectarian division between the 'Southern (Tengali) and the 'Northern' (Vadagalai) schools, with the former emphasizing the Tamil heritage and making a larger place for non-Brahmin groups... "
Tengali India - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "TENGALAI: followers of RAMANUJA who emphasized his teachings about divine GRACE, known as the 'Cat-principle' and adhered to non-VEDIC SCRIPTURES known as the Prambandham or collected poems of the lvrs. The greatest SAINT of the SECT is Varavara Muni who is regarded as an AVATAR of Ramunuja. "
Tenggerese Indonesia: Java - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 342. "On the slopes of the east Javanese volacano Bromo live the Tenggerese, an archaic Javanese subgroup, who practice a folk religion derived from Majapahit Hinduism and highlighting the honoring of Joko Seger, Bromo's guardian spirit. "
Tenino North America - Pacific Coast 3,600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Tenino (with Tyigh and other bands): 3,600 "
Tenino world 3,600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Tenino (with Tyigh and other bands): 3,600 "
Tenrikyo Argentina - - 12
units
- 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 1 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo 1998 ". Church-supplied data. 12 mission stations
Tenrikyo Australia - - 1
unit
- 1978 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The Tenrikyo religion... is understood that the religion was first brought to Australia from Japan by a sailor missionary who regularly served on a cargo ship trading between Australia and Japan. The first mission in Australia was established in 1978 in Boronia Road, Boronia. This mission later became the first Tenrikyo church in Australia in 1989. "
Tenrikyo Australia 46 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census.
Tenrikyo Australia - - 8
units
- 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 1 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo 1998 ". Church-supplied data. 1 mission centers; 1 churches; 3 mission stations; 3 church's overseas offices
Tenrikyo Brazil - - 388
units
- 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 1 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo 1998 ". Church-supplied data. 1 mission headquarters; 77 churches; 308 mission stations; 2 church's overseas offices
Tenrikyo Canada - - 15
units
- 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 1 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo 1998 ". Church-supplied data. 4 churches; 11 church's overseas offices
Tenrikyo Chile - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 1 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo 1998 ". Church-supplied data. 1 mission stations
Tenrikyo Colombia - - 7
units
- 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 1 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo 1998 ". Church-supplied data. 1 mission centers; 6 mission stations
Tenrikyo Congo, Republic of the (Brazzaville) - - 3
units
- 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 1 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo 1998 ". Church-supplied data. 1 churches; 2 mission stations
Tenrikyo Ecuador - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 1 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo 1998 ". Church-supplied data. 1 mission stations
Tenrikyo France - - 8
units
- 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 1 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo 1998 ". Church-supplied data. 1 mission centers; 1 churches; 3 mission stations; 3 church's overseas offices
Tenrikyo Germany - - 2
units
- 1998 *LINK* official Tenrikyo web site; page: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo: 1 of 2 " (viewed 10 Dec. 1999) Table: "A Statistical Review of Tenrikyo 1998 ". Church-supplied data. 2 church's overseas offices


Tenrikyo, continued

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