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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Taara, Estonia

Taara, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Tabasaran Russia: Dagestan 98,000 - - - 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 294-295. Table with 2 columns: "Ethnic Group " [not religious groups] & "Population "; Pg. 295: "Aside from the Mountain Jews and the Christian Cossacks, the peoples of Dagestan are almost exclusively Muslim. "
Taejonggyo Japan - - - - 1988 *LINK* Takafumi,Iida. "Folk Religion Among the Koreans in Japan The Shamanism of the 'Korean Temples' " in Japanese Journal of Religious Studies June-September 1988 15/2-3. (Viewed on JJRS web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "Other Korean sects include the Taego sect, which has a number of temples [in Japan]. "
Taejonggyo Korea - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "Korea, since the 1960s, has seen the emergence of religious movements seeking to rediscover the indigenous Korean religion, that ancient religion which is believed to have prevailed prior to the importation of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Christianity. These movements include... the Tae Jong Church, the Han Il Church, the Chun Do Church, and countless small groups of folk religionists. "
Taejonggyo Korea, South - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 415. "At Sindo-an village in the foothills of Keiryong Mountain near Taejon, a number of indigenous sects have their center. This is popularly regarded as the site of the future capital of the country, under a leader of the Chong family, as foretold in a sixteenth century messianic text, the Chonggam-nok. "
Taejonggyo Korea, South - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "A Window on Korea "; web page: "Taejonggyo: The Oldest Religion in Korea " (viewed 23 Jan. 1999) "Korea's oldest religion, other than nature worship, is Taejonggyo. Called Koshindo until the early 20th century, it embodies a myth of national foundation comparable to other nations. There are few adherents of this belief today, but it has obviously influenced later religious developments... By the 15th century, this cult had practically disappeared. However, the resurgence of Korean nationalism and a spirit of independence in the late 19th and early 20th centuries led to the appearance of several sects claiming to represent a revival of this ancient cult. "
Taensa North America - Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps 500 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Taensa world 500 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Tagbanua Philippines 14,000 - - - 1985 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 729. "Tagbanua: Location: Philippines; Population: 14,000 (1980s); Religion: Indigenous beliefs; some Catholicism and Protestantism "
Tai Asia - Southeast - - - 2
countries
1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 709. "For the most part these tribal people live in village-based societies, but a few groups--e.g., the Tai of northern Laos and northern Vietnam--have been organized, at least until recently, into chiefdoms. "
Tai Vietnam 2,000,000 2.79% - - 1994 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Vietnam ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1994); pg. 37, 39. Pg. 37: "...Vietnam's 71.8 million people... "; Pg. 39: "In the mountains of northern Vietnam, the largest ethnic groups are the Tai (2,000,000), the Muong (550,0000), the Hmong Meo (200,000), and the Zao (200,000). Tai speech is similar to the language spoken in Thailand... "
Tai-ping China - - - - 1865 Wilson, Bryan. "Traditional Religion Divides Society " in Enduring Issues in Sociology (Lynn Barteck & Karen Mullin, editors). San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press (1995). [Originally source: Religious Sects: A Sociological Study. New York: McGraw-Hill (1970)]; pg. 215. "At first glance, sects may appear to be marginal and incidental phenomena in history... Yet, at times, sects have had an immense significance for the course of history... The Mahdi movement in the Sudan in the 1880s, or the Tai-ping movement in China a couple decades earlier, each significantly affected the history of their own peoples and that of people far from the places where these sects arose... "
Taino Puerto Rico 40,000 100.00% - - 1500 C.E. Perl, Lila. Puerto Rico: Island Between Two Worlds. New York: William Morrow and Company (1979); pg. 29, 32. Perl, Lila. Puerto Rico: Island Between Two Worlds. New York: William Morrow and Company (1979), pg. 29, 32.
Taino Puerto Rico 4,000 - - - 1520 C.E. Perl, Lila. Puerto Rico: Island Between Two Worlds. New York: William Morrow and Company (1979); pg. 32. Perl, Lila. Puerto Rico: Island Between Two Worlds. New York: William Morrow and Company (1979), pg. 32.
Taino Puerto Rico - - - - 1600 Perl, Lila. Puerto Rico: Island Between Two Worlds. New York: William Morrow and Company (1979); pg. 79. Perl, Lila. Puerto Rico: Island Between Two Worlds. New York: William Morrow and Company (1979), pg. 79.
Taino Puerto Rico - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "
Taiwanese - Aboriginal Taiwan 357,600 1.70% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Taiwan " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The number of the population is about 21 million consisting of the first aboriginal inhabitants (including nine major tribes consisting of over 357,600 people), 'mainlanders who immigrated from China after 1949, and the majority 'native Taiwanese', descendants of Chinese who came to Taiwan between 17th and 19th centuries. "
Taize France 70 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 731. "Taize (Christian). An interdenominational and international monastic community founded at Taise (SE France) in 1940 by its present prior, Roger Schutz (b. 1915). Originally founded as a form of monasticism within Protestantism, the community of more than seventy men with vows of celibacy, submission to authority, and common property is engaged chiefly in promoting Christian unity. Close ties are maintained with the World Council of Churches, Constantinople, and Rome. Small groups of brothers work at many different tasks in Latin America and Africa. "
Tajik Afghanistan 3,625,000 25.00% - - 1989 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Afghanistan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1989); pg. 40, 42. "About 14.5 million people live in Afghanistan... "; Pg. 42: "Tajiks, Afghanistan's second largest ethnic group, make up 25% of the population and generally live in the northeast. Many also reside in the west near the city of Heart and in the northwest. They all speak dialects of Dari, an Indo-European langage related to Farsi, which is spoken in Iran. "
Takelma North America - Pacific Coast 500 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Latgawa
Takelma world 500 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Latgawa
Tamil India 67,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 746. "Tamils... Population: 67 million in India; 3 million in Sri Lanka "; "Tamils are mostly Hindus, although there are some Tamil Muslims and Christians. " [NOTE: These statistics are of Tamils as a cultural/ethnic group, NOT a distinct religion.]
Tamil Sri Lanka 1,000,000 10.00% - - 1966 Welty, Paul Thomas. The Asians: Their Heritage and Their Destiny (Revised Edition). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (1966); pg. 54-55. "Ceylon has a population of approximately 10 million, the great majority of whom are Singhalese... The Tamils, who make up about 10% of the population, came to Ceylon at a later date from South India... "
Tamil Sri Lanka 2,970,000 18.00% - - 1988 Zimmermann, Robert. Sri Lanka (series: "Enchantment of the World "). Chicago: Childrens Press (1992); pg. 18-19. An ethnic group. "Sri Lanka's population had reached over 16.5 million in 1988... "; Pg. 19: "...The other [cultural] groups are the Tamils, 18%; the Moors, 7%; and very small groups (Eurasians, Burghers, Malays, Pakistanis, Europeans, and Veddahs), 1%. "
Tamil Sri Lanka 3,325,000 19.00% - - 1997 Russell, Malcom B. The Middle East and South Asia 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 204. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Tamil Sri Lanka 3,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 746. "Tamils... Population: 67 million in India; 3 million in Sri Lanka "; "Tamils are mostly Hindus, although there are some Tamil Muslims and Christians. " [NOTE: These statistics are of Tamils as a cultural/ethnic group, NOT a distinct religion.]
Tamil world 40,000,000 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 733. "Tamil. A language of the Dravidian family, whose presence in the Indian subcontinent evidently predates the arrival of the Aryans. Spoken since the earliest historical times in the southernmost portion of India, Tamil is the oldest historically attested language of this family (third-second century B.C. cave inscriptions) and has a literary tradition older than that of any other language of India except Sanskrit and perhaps Pali. Unlike these, however, it continues in use to this day as the mother tongue of over forty million people. The main importance of Tamil as a religious language is its role in the development of Hindu devotionalism, which since the seventh or eighth century has been the major orientation of religious thought in south India, eventually spreading to much of the rest of India (see Bhakti Hinduism). "
Tamil world 70,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 746. "Tamils... Population: 67 million in India; 3 million in Sri Lanka "; "Tamils are mostly Hindus, although there are some Tamil Muslims and Christians. " [NOTE: These statistics are of Tamils as a cultural/ethnic group, NOT a distinct religion.]
Tan Goon Church Korea - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "Korea, since the 1960s, has seen the emergence of religious movements seeking to rediscover the indigenous Korean religion, that ancient religion which is believed to have prevailed prior to the importation of Confucianism, Buddhism, and Christianity. These movements include the Tan Goon Church, named after Tan Goon, the ancestor of the Korean people; the Tae Jong Church, the Han Il Church, the Chun Do Church, and countless small groups of folk religionists. "
Tana Bhagat India - Oraons - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 605. "There are a number of Hinduized cults, known as bhagats, found within traditional Oraon society... The Kabirpanthi sect (followers of the 15th-century reformer Kabir) and the Tana Bhagat are two of the more important of these Hindu groups among the Oraons. Census returns show that nearly 60% of Oraons are now Hindu. "
Tanana Alaska 415 - - - 1910 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 86. "Tanana... They lived on the lower part of the Tanana River in Alaska... They numbered 415 in 1910. Later estimates are very uncertain. "
Tangun Korea, South - - - - 1945 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 415. "The veneration of Tangun as center of a national cult was promoted by Na Ch'ol (1864-1916), but it could not operate freely in the Japanese era. After 1945 it was revived and regional centers of worship were built, but the religion lacked popular appeal. "
Tantrism world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 735. "Tantrism (Hindu, Buddhist & Jain -- Skt.; lit. 'that which extends, spreads'). 1. In a general sense, a non-Vedic practice, including rites open to women and persons not of the Brahmin caste. It also includes the worship of deities for the purpose of specific religious merit or worldly gain. 2. In a narrower but more popular sense, an esoteric, radical way to achieve Moksa... It includes a large body of scriptural and oral lore, parallel, and in Hinduism and Jainism, marginal to official scriptures... Types of tantrism. First is the clandestine, often eroticized versions of yoga. In Tibetan Buddhism it is synonymous with the 'diamond vehicle' (see Vajrayana) and is part of mainstream doctrine and practice. In Hinduism, however, it is peripheral and antagonistic to orthodoxy and orthopraxis. Second, tantrism on the Indian subcontinent is largely identified with shamanistic behavior... Third, a learned convention among Hindu scholars calls all non-Vedic practice tantric... "
Taoism Africa - 0.00% - - 1981 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983). [Source: 1981 Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 433. Table: Membership in the Major Religions of the World "
Taoism Asia 31,260,000 - - - 1981 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983). [Source: 1981 Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 433. Table: Membership in the Major Religions of the World "
Taoism Asia 30,260,000 1.16% - - 1982 Robertson, Ian. Sociology (2nd ed.); New York, NY: Worth Publishers (1981 2nd edition; updated since 1977 1st ed.). [Orig. source: Encyclopaedia Britannica Book of the Year, 1982]; pg. 405. Table: "Estimated membership of the principal religions of the world "
Taoism Australia 2,980 0.02% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census.
Taoism Cambodia 108,610 1.00% - - 1999 Canesso, Claudia. Cambodia (in "Major World Nations " series), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 63, 73, 75. Pg. 63: "Of Cambodia's estimated population of 10,861,000, about 90% are... Khmer. "; pg. 73: "Today, about 1 percent of the country's people are ethnically Chinese, and they live mostly in Phnom Penh and other large towns. "; pg. 75: "...almost all of the Chinese are Taoist... "
Taoism Canada 1,720 - - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "Toronto Consultants on Religious Tolerance "; web page: "Taoism " (viewed 2 March 1999) "Taoism currently has about 20 million followers, and is primarily centered in Taiwan. About 30,000 Taoists live in North America; 1,720 in Canada (1991 census). "
Taoism China - - - - -206 B.C.E. Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 43. "The ordinary people were not particularly attracted by the abstract concepts and metaphysical reflections of Daoism. Even at the beginning of the Han period (206 BC - AD 220), there were signs of both a popular and religious Daoism. As Buddhism also became more and more popular, it borrowed ideas from Daoism, and vice versa, to the point where one might speak of a fusion between the two. "
Taoism China - - - - -200 B.C.E. Rice, Edward. Ten Religions of the East. New York: Four Winds Press (1978); pg. 94. "By the second century B.C., four centuries after Lao Tzu, the tenets of 'pure' Taoism were followed by a few, but Taoism itself had been taken over by the wonder workers, for its mysticism implied great occult powers for the initiate. "
Taoism China - - - - 150 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Taoism; pg. 183. "During the 2nd century AD, famine and plagues caused great turmoil and led hundreds of thousands of Chinese to embrace Taoism, which offered a more personal and emotionally appealing form of religion than state Confucianism. The Han dynasty's oppressive rule added to the peasants' suffering and helped accelerate the swing. "
Taoism China - - - - 184 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Taoism; pg. 183-184. "In 184, the government took steps to stem the flood of conversions [to Taoism], which led to a reaction among the Taoists. Some 360,000 of them put yellow cloth on their heads on the same day as a show of solidarity... The rebellion... was suppressed and Chang Chueh executed, but the Taoist Church had been established; it continued to function alongside the other currents of Philosophical Taoism and individual Taois magicians and sorcerers. "
Taoism China - - - - 1949 Rice, Edward. Ten Religions of the East. New York: Four Winds Press (1978); pg. 95. "In 1949 Mao Tse-tung formally proscribed all secret organizations, including the Taoist sects, and arrested those who did not abandon their beliefs. "
Taoism China - - - - 1957 Rice, Edward. Ten Religions of the East. New York: Four Winds Press (1978); pg. 95. "In 1949 Mao Tse-tung [banned all] Taoist sects... But curiously in 1957, under the formal auspices of the Communist government, the Chinese Taoist Association was organized at Peking, its first meeting brought together former monks and nuns from all over the country. "
Taoism China - - - - 1970 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 191-192. "the People's Republic of China was established along Communist lines in 1949. The Marxist government discouraged religion but did not ban it outright; that prohibition occurred during the disastrous period of the Great Cultural Revolution, 1966-78. Then, many Buddhist and Taoist temples and shrines were closed or destroyed and the clergy forced into labor. The same thing happened to the Catholic, Protestant, and Islamic clergy and places of worship that had been established in China. "
Taoism China - 6.00% - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 192. "the state now sanctions Taoism and Buddhism, along with Western religion. The latter account for only a small percentage of the population, and official statistics say that 6% practice Taoism openly -- a figure challenged by many outside observers, who feel the number should be much higher. Inner alchemy, feng shui, augury, tao-yin and ancestor worship (although not specifically Taoist) still flourish among the populace, as does belief in the traditional dieties such as San I, Tsao-chun, the Queen Mother of the West, and the Pole Star Deity. "
Taoism China - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Taoism; pg. 190. "Today there are at least 86 sects of Taoism, including many lay societies that, apart from their religious beliefs, have a history of opposing autocratic or tyrannical rule. "
Taoism China - - 15,000
units
- 1997 Breuilly, Elizabeth, et al. Religions of the World: The Illustrated Guide to Origins, Beliefs, Traditions & Festivals. Facts on File Inc.: New York, NY (1997); pg. 10 to 11. "There are 15,000 Taoist priests, both male and female, in China, with numbers growing rapidly. " NOTE: It may or may not be not be accurate at all to equate Chinese Taoist priests with "congegations, " as I've done here, but I wanted to include this stat.
Taoism China - - - - 1998 Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998); pg. 49. "Taoists... Illustration: Taishan, on Mt. Tai, China, is the most famous mountain shrine... "
Taoism Europe - 0.00% - - 1981 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983). [Source: 1981 Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 433. Table: Membership in the Major Religions of the World "
Taoism Hong Kong - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter author: Marjorie Topley; pg. 459. "Today in Hong Kong elderly men to whom Taoism seems especially to appeal, and some women climb mountains early in the morning, or perform the careful slow movements of Chinese boxing in quiet spots in the city. Some, in order to be in tune with Nature, keep little birds in cages. "
Taoism Hong Kong - - - - 1998 Kagda, Falaq. Hong Kong (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1998); pg. 67. "Most Hong Kong Chinese practice a mix of Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism... In all, there are more than 600 Buddhist and Taoist temple in the territory. "
Taoism Korea, South - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 210. "Daoism has been practiced in Korea for more than 1,300 years, but active examples of its presence ar rare these days. Though Daoist texts were often studied in thepast, and though some of Korea's Buddhist temples temporarily served as Doist temples, few remnants of early Daoist art survive today. Daoism achieved its greatest height in Korea during the Unified Silla dynasty (AD 668-918). Practitioners aren't so dedicated today, but Daoism is experiencing something of a renaissance as a number of modern schools draw on its teachings. "
Taoism New Zealand 189 0.01% - - 1986 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1986 NZ population: 3,263,228.
Taoism New Zealand 324 0.01% - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1991 NZ population: 3,373,853.
Taoism New Zealand 567 0.02% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1996 NZ population: 3,616,633.
Taoism North America - 0.00% - - 1900 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long. Table: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions, 1900-2025 "; "North America, defined by the U.N. to include Bermuda, Canada, Greenland, St. Pierre & Miquelon & U.S. "; listed in table as: "Taoists "
Taoism North America - 0.00% - - 1925 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long. Table: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions, 1900-2025 "; "North America, defined by the U.N. to include Bermuda, Canada, Greenland, St. Pierre & Miquelon & U.S. "; listed in table as: "Taoists "
Taoism North America - 0.00% - - 1950 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long. Table: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions, 1900-2025 "; "North America, defined by the U.N. to include Bermuda, Canada, Greenland, St. Pierre & Miquelon & U.S. "; listed in table as: "Taoists "
Taoism North America - 0.00% - - 1975 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long. Table: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions, 1900-2025 "; "North America, defined by the U.N. to include Bermuda, Canada, Greenland, St. Pierre & Miquelon & U.S. "; listed in table as: "Taoists "
Taoism North America 16,000 - - - 1981 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983). [Source: 1981 Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 433. Table: Membership in the Major Religions of the World "; North America in this table "includes Central America and West Indies. "
Taoism North America 16,000 0.00% - - 1982 Robertson, Ian. Sociology (2nd ed.); New York, NY: Worth Publishers (1981 2nd edition; updated since 1977 1st ed.). [Orig. source: Encyclopaedia Britannica Book of the Year, 1982]; pg. 405. Table: "Estimated membership of the principal religions of the world "
Taoism North America 30,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance -
Taoism North America - 0.00% - - 2000 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long. Table: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions, 1900-2025 "; "North America, defined by the U.N. to include Bermuda, Canada, Greenland, St. Pierre & Miquelon & U.S. "; listed in table as: "Taoists "; [Year 2000 projection made circa 1997]
Taoism North America - 0.00% - - 2025 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check "; web page: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions " (viewed 25 Feb. 1999), written by Justin D. Long. Table: "North America: Decline & Fall of World Religions, 1900-2025 "; "North America, defined by the U.N. to include Bermuda, Canada, Greenland, St. Pierre & Miquelon & U.S. "; listed in table as: "Taoists "; [Year 2025 projection made circa 1997]


Taoism, continued

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