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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Stoicism, world

Stoicism, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Stoneites world 12,940 - - - 1827 Spence, Hartzell. The Story of America's Religions; New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1960) [1st printing 1957]; pg. 187. "By 1827, the Stoneites [one of groups that was a precursor of today's Christian Churches (Disciples of Christ)] numbered 12,940, from Kentucky and Tennessee to Missouri. "
Student Volunteer Movement world 8,000 - - - 1919 Oxtoby, Willard G. The Meaning of Other Faiths. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press (1983); pg. 65. "19th-century Protestantism in Europe & America also saw a massive outpouring of missionary energy. The Student Volunteer Movement is only one example of this. It drew strength from some Protestants' expectations of the second coming of Christ... With huge quadrennial missionary conventions over the years 1891 to 1919, the SVM recruited more than 8,000 missionaries. "
Subud Australia 600 - 10
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The World Subud Association, known in Australia as Subud Australia Inc, originated in Yogyakarta, Central Java, Indonesia in 1947, and came to Australia in 1958... In Australia there are ten Subud centres and approximately 600 members. "
Subud Indonesia - - - - 1921 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 719. "Subud. Movement started in Indonesia after World War I by Muhammad Subuh (b. 1901)... "
Subud United Kingdom: Britain 2,000 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; All members are in full-time column.
Subud United Kingdom: Britain 1,794 - - - 1999 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Orig. source: Immanuel Craig, Administrator, Subud Britain.] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... Subud: Britain: 1,794 (1999)... "
Subud USA - - 70
units
- 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 458. "...more than 70 Subud Centers in the U.S? "
Subud world - - - 60
countries
1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 458. "...Subud?The practices of Bapak Muhammad Subuh (b. 1901), have been adopted by members in over 60 countries, including more than 70 Subud Centers in the U.S?After growing slowly in Java [Indonesia], the movement began spreading to Europe and America in 1957. Muslims, Christians, Hindus, Jews, and Buddhists practice the latihan, but formal membership in Subud precludes formal membership in any other sacred tradition, including Islam. "
Subud world 12,000 - - 80
countries
1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The World Subud Association... Founded by Bapak Muhammad Subuh Sumohadiwidjojo, the movement now has between ten and twelve thousand members worldwide. Subud is established in over eighty countries but the exact number of centres is unknown. "
Subud world - - 385
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site Subud:
There are some 385 Subud groups in various communities throughout the world.
Subud world 12,000 - - - 1999 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Orig. source: Raymond Harding-Cox, Subud Britain Webmaster.] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... Subud:... World: 12,000 (1999)... "
Sudan Interior Church Sudan: Khartoum - - 25
units
- 1999 *LINK* "Standing with the Church in Sudan " in SIM NOW, April 1999 (vol. #86); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "'The Sudan Interior Church has grown because of the problems we've had,' he says. 'In Khartoum, we have 25 churches, 19 of which are organized and 6 that are in developing stages.' "
Sudan Interior Church world 11,000 - 109
units
- 1999 *LINK* "Eastern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "In 1988, all but two of the churches located in the south were destroyed. Today, including Sudanese refugees in other countries, the SIM-related Sudan Interior Church (SIC) is composed of 56 fully organized churches and 53 developing churches, with nearly 11,000 baptized members, 28 pastors, and 30 evangelists. "
Sudan Interior Mission Ethiopia 125,000 - - - 1972 Marty, Martin E. Protestantism (History of Religion Series). New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1972); pg. 12. "Ethiopia, a Christian (Coptic) exception in North Africa, does include a 125,000-member Protestant group, the Sudan Interior Mission, and Sudan itself has a rather strong Anglican (80,000-member) diocese. "
Sudan Interior Mission Sudan 3 - - - 1902 *LINK* web site: "Christian Missions "; web page: "SIM History " (viewed 6 July 1999). "...the Sudan Interior Mission. It began when three dedicated young men landed at Lagos, Nigeria. The oldest was only 25. But each man burned with a desire to establish a Christian witness among the 60 million unreached people of what was then known as the Soudan in sub-Saharan Africa. Unable to interest established missions - most of which said reaching the Soudan was impossible and possibly outside God's will - the three set out following God alone... In 1902, the party successfully established a base 500 miles inland. From this base, the work of SIM began in Africa. "
Sudra India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 719. "Sudra. A generic term for members of the lowest rank of the traditional fourfold Hindu social structure. Most of the agricultural and artisan castes (jati) are of Sudra status, and although ritually inferior to the Twice Born castes, Sudras seldom suffer from any social discrimination and often enjoy great political power. "
Sufi Order in the West USA - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 450. "Hazrat Inayat, who belonged to the Chisti order in India, later married the niece of Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of Christian Science; the offspring of that union was Pir Vilayat Inayat Khan (b. 1916). Pir Vilayat went on to become a prominent Sufi teacher in America and the formal spiritual successor to his father, founding a community known as the Abode of the Message in New Lebanon, New York, in 1974. The Abode is currently the national headquarters of the Sufi Order in the West, Pir Vilayat's universalist vision of Sufism that teaches respect for all the world's great religious traditions... it does not embrace orthodox Islamic laws and practices, such as the daily prayers, and so is not considered to be genuine Sufism by many Muslims. "
Sufism Bosnia and Herzegovina - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 71-72. "Location: Bosnia and Herzegovina; Population: 4.5 million (1992) "; Pg. 72: "About 44% of Bosnians today are Muslim. Sufism (mystical Islam) also became established in Bosnia. "
Sufism Chechnia - - - - 1980 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 96. "Islam is the traditional Chechen religion. Despite efforts of the atheistic Soviet regime to eradicate the practice of Islam, the Chechens continued to adhere strongly to their relgion throughout the years of Soviet power. However, because the practice of Islam was not permitted during these years, many conventions if Islam, particularly pubic prayers, were not maintained. Instead, a sect of Islam called Sufism gained strength in Chechnia. Because Sufism emphasized secrecy and mysticism, it was well-suited to the need to observe religion in secrecy during the Soviet period. "
Sufism Chechnia 500,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* Originally published in Religious Studies News, Sept. 1995, Vol. 10, No. 3., p. 10. The Religious Roots of Conflict: Russia and Chechnya, An Essay by David Damrel. just under a million Muslim Chechens... Reliable membership figures are impossible to establish, but a 1975 Soviet survey in Chechnya claimed that half of the Muslim population there belonged to local Sufi orders
Sufism Egypt - - 60
units
- 1968 Nyrop, Richard F., et al. Area Handbook for Egypt (3rd Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975); pg. 119. "Sufism exists in a number of forms, most representing an original tariqa (discipline or way; pl., turuq) developed by an inspired founder, or shaykh... At leat until the end of the 18th century, this organized mysticism was central to Islam... The turuq, however, have proven unequal to the challenge of modernism and have lost much of their prestige with the educated... In the latter third of the 20th century, therefore, the major strength of turuq lies with the illiterate rural population... The level of popular Sufi devotions has therefore been declining... Observers have nonetheless noted an apparent increase in interest in mysticism among the educated... The approximately sixty orders existing in the late 1960s therefore continued as a focus for personal loyalty but as a force with negligable national influence. "
Sufism Germany 10,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Sufi-Gemeinschaften " in table. Source: REMID.; Listed in 'Islam' section.
Sufism Iran - - - - 1999 Lyle, Garry. Iran (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 87. "Members of a few other Islamic sects live in Iran. Sufism, a school of Islamic mysticism, had many followers in medieval Persia, and a few Iranians still practice its rituals... "
Sufism Mauritania - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 296. "In Mauritania, as in much of West Africa, Islamic Sufi brotherhoods, known as tariqas, gained importance around the 13th century... The brotherhoods transcended ethnic and tribal lines, thus helping to develop a broad national identity beyond that of separate clans and ethnic groups. Mauritania has two major and some minor brotherhoods. The major ones are the Qadiriyya and Tijaniyya orders. "
Sufism New Zealand 231 0.01% - - 1986 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1986 NZ population: 3,263,228.
Sufism New Zealand 327 0.01% - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1991 NZ population: 3,373,853.
Sufism New Zealand 150 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1996 NZ population: 3,616,633.
Sufism Ottoman Empire - 50.00% - - 1700 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 722. "3. Modern Sufism. The time of greatest influence for the Sufi orders coincided with the regional hegemony of the Ottoman and Mogul empires, spanning approximately three centuries, 1500-1800. The number of Muslims affiliated with Sufi brotherhoods during this period was certainly not less than half the population and may have been as high as 80 percent. "
Sufism Turkey - - - - 1993 Sheehan, Sean. Turkey (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1993); pg. 75. "Today, a performance of the dance is officially allowed in Konya during the annual Mevlana Festival. The dancers are not only Turks but include Sufi adherents from neighboring Moslem countries as well... The town of Konya [in Turkey] has become the center of Sufic mysticism in the Middle East. Within Turkey, it has a reputation as a place of religious zeal and conservatism. "; Pg. 76: "Konya is the repository of the illuminated Mathnawi, the poetical work of Ar-Rumi... The museum also contains many of the priceless gifts received by Ar-Rumi during his lifetime... "
Sufism USA - - - - 1925 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 449. "Sufism in America has sometimes taken a different shape from its Middle Eastern and Asian versions. The Indian-born Sufi master Hazrat Inayat Khan (1882-1927), the first major Sufi figure to come to the West, brought his teachings to the U.S. in the 1920s. Hazrat Inayat, who belonged to the Chisti order in India, later married the niece of Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of Christian Science... "
Sufism USA - - - - 1993 *LINK* Religious Requirements & Practices of Certain Selected Groups: A Handbook for Chaplains (1993) - (online ed. - 1998); contract #: MDA903-90-C-0062 w/ Dept. of Defense; J. Gordon Melton, Project Director & James Lewis. "The Sufi Order is the largest of some 10 Sufi groups [in the U.S.], most of which have arisen in the 20th century. Recent immigration has brought a number of Sufi groups especially those based in Turkey & Iran. The Habibiyya Shadiliyya Order is a classic dervish group. Sufism Reoriented organizes the followers of modern Sufi Master Meher Baba. Other groups are built around Sufi teachers G.I Gurdjieff, Pak Sabuh, E.J. Gold, and Guru Bawa. "
Sufism world - - - - 990 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 719-720. "Sufism; Tasawwuf. The name most often applied to Islamic Mysticism consisting of three overlapping but distinct historical periods: classical, medieval, and modern. 1. Classical Sufism. The origins of the Sufi movement are obscure. Some hold that Sufism was intrinsic to primitive Islam...By the late tenth century theorists attempted to consolidate and synthesize the elements of Sufi teaching. The handbooks they produced abound in correlations... "
Sufism world 9,000,000 0.42% - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 101, 117. Pg. 101: "Islam... Today its adherents, 300 million strong, encompass nearly one seventh of the total population of the earth. "; Pg. 117: "Today about 3 percent of Moslems are Sufis, who are divided into uncounted orders and fraternities. More than 70 of these orders are comprised of fakirs or dervishes... "
Sufism world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 723. "During the twentieth century other Sufi orders have shared the fate of the Sanusiyya. Nowhere in the Muslim world today does organized Sufism have political leverage comparable to that which it exercised for much of the last century. On the one hand, there are isolated manifestations of the traditional forms of authority and teaching in some orders: Ahmad al-'Alawi of the North African Darqawiyya, for instance, has influenced many Europeans, including the British orientalist M. Lings, while other neo-Sufi shaikhs, such as Idries Shah, Pir Vilayet Khan, and Sam Lewis, have tried to introduce Sufism to Westerners unacquainted with Islam. "
Sufism world - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 447. "By the 9th-11th centuries, specific Sufi orders began to take shape around the teachings of individual shaykhs. With some notable exceptions, these brotherhoods descended from Sunni founders. Structurally, the orders patterned themselves on the craft guilds that flourished in the Near East, with hierarchies, secret initiations, and oaths similar to those of the guilds, themselves often loosely tied to a Sufi tariqa. There are 400 major Sufi orders... "
Sufism world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 245. "Sufism: The Islamic ascetic and mystical movement which, it has been conjectured, was partly influenced by the Jewish Midrashic literature but which certainly, in turn, exercised considerable influence on Jewish mystical and ethical literature on Jewish mystical and ethical literature. But the most marked influence on Sufism on Jewish thought is found in Bahya, Ibn Pakudah's Duties of the Heart, where the very title and the ideas behind it belong to Sufism. Bahya gives examples of Hasidim who are not Jews and are probably Sufi saints. The arrangement of the material in the form of Ten Gates in Bahya's work also owes much to Sufi treatises. Some of the titles of these 'Gates' to piety are the titles used in Sufic works. In Gate Nine, on the theme of abstinence, Bahya quotes sayings of the Sufis whom he calls Perushim ('Separatists' or 'Abstainers') in the sense of ascetics, although he takes issue with the extreme ascetism followed by the Sufis. "
Sufism world - Kurds - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 414-415. "About one-fifth are Shi'ite, especially in Iran. Many Kurds also belong to Sufi (Islamic mystic) brotherhoods and meet to chant and dance together to worship Allah. The Sufi brotherhoods are very important in Kurdish village life. "
Suhrawardi India - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 448. "The main [Sufi] order of India and Pakistan is the Chisti, now prominent in South East Asia. Founded by Muin ad-din Hasan Chisti (c. 1142-1236), it focuses largely on the recitation of the dhikr. Although Shaykh Chisti was influenced by the writings of Dia ad-din Abu Njib al-Suhrawardi (1097-1168), whose Suhrawardi order is also influential in India, the Chisti order is distinct from it. "
Suhrawardi India - north - - - - 1300 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 722. "The time of greatest influence for the Sufi orders... Ottoman and Mogul empires... 1500-1800. The number of Muslims affiliated with Sufi brotherhoods during this period was certainly not less than half the population and may have been as high as 80 percent... From the thirteenth century on, North India was populated with the convent-tomb complexes of the Chishtiyya and the Suhrawardiyya. "
Suiga Shinto Japan - - - - 1682 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 189. "Suiga shinto: Or suika shinto. 'Conferment of benefits Shinto' or 'Descent of divine blessing Shinto'. A Neo-Confucian, anti-Buddhist school of thought and Shinto lineage founded by Yamazaki, Ansai (1616-1682)... "
Sukama Tanzania - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Sukyo Mahikari Australia 668 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census.
Sukyo Mahikari Australia 2,000 - 9
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Mahikari arrived in Australia in 1974 and is recognised as a non-profit religious and educational organisation by the Australian Government. There are 9 centres in Australia and about 2000 members... "
Sukyo Mahikari Canada 300 - - - 1999 *LINK* Ross, Rick. OPPOSING VIEW web page: "Mahikari/Sukyo Mahikari " (viewed 4 July 1999). "Mahikari/Sukyo Mahikari, aka American name: 'Church of World Messianity', San Francisco "; Garry Greenwood, former member: "Sukyo Mahikari has around 1,000 plus active core memebrs in the United States with probably a few hundred in Canada. The other second largest faction of Mahikari (Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyodan) also probably has over 500 active members there ".
Sukyo Mahikari Japan - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "The founder of Mahikari, Yoshikazu Okada (1901-1974), was a member of Sekai Kyusei Kyo before receiving his own revelations in 1959... The two sects Mahikari [i.e. Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyodan] and Sukyo Mahikari both practice a nearly identical form of healing called okiyome... "
Sukyo Mahikari USA 1,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Ross, Rick. OPPOSING VIEW web page: "Mahikari/Sukyo Mahikari " (viewed 4 July 1999). "Mahikari/Sukyo Mahikari, aka American name: 'Church of World Messianity', San Francisco "; Garry Greenwood, former member: "Sukyo Mahikari has around 1,000 plus active core memebrs in the United States with probably a few hundred in Canada. The other second largest faction of Mahikari (Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyodan) also probably has over 500 active members there ".
Sukyo Mahikari world 1,000,000 - 1,000
units
100
countries
1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The Mahikari organisation, an international, apolitical, non-denominational organisation, was established in 1959 by Mr. Kotama Okada, generally known as Sukuinushisama. In 1978, the organisation was named Sukyo Mahikari. Beginning in Japan, Tokyo... There are... and hundreds, possibly thousands of centres worldwide. There are probably at least one million members (Sukyo Mahikari has spread to about 100 countries). "
Sukyo Mahikari world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Web page: "What's Sukyo Mahikari? " [Non-academic OPPOSING VIEW page] (viewed 4 July 1999). "Sukyo Mahikari, meaning True Light, has been... founded in 1959 [by] Yoshikazu Okada... Sukyo Mahikari is active and established in most countries of the world (Japan, Australia, United States, North and South America, Europe and Africa). "
Sulaymani Bohras Saudi Arabia - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 223. "Tayyibi Ismailis (the Bohras): Arising out of the disputed Assassins succession in the 12th century, the believe in the concealment of the two year-old al-Tayyib, and that there has been no revealed Imam since 1130. They give authority to the chief missionary, the Dai a-Dua. After persecution in Yemen his seat was moved to Bombay. Following a disputed succession the group divided between the Daudi Bohras who live mainly in India, and the Sulaymani Bohras who live in Najran in Saudi Arabia. "
Sullivanians world 400 - - - 1975 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 106-107. "The Sullivanians were therapists, patients, and their families associated with the Sullivan Institute for Research in Psychoanalysis. The group was named after Harry Stack Sullivan, a well-known psychiatrist who died in 1949. The leader of the group, Saul Newton, had been a student of Sullivan's... In addition to a couple of apartment buildings, the group also owned other valuable real estate in Greenwich Village and upstate New York. At its peak during the 1970s the Sullivanian cult had some 400 members... By the 1980s the community had begun to unravel... Saul Newton finally died in 1991. At this writing, the community, now much reduced in size, still hangs on. But its days are clearly numbered. "
Suma Ching Hai California 2,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) [Orig. source: Dion Nissenbaum's article "Sect Master a No-show, Rumors Had Ching Hai in Lake Elsinore " in The Press- Enterprise, December 31, 1996 p.B01] Buddhism:
She has approximately 2,000 members in California
Suma Ching Hai Taiwan 300,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) Buddhism:
In Taiwan, she reportedly has 300,000 followers. But, when the government closed down her headquarters (it was constructed without a license), the cult produced only 804 names which belies the 6,000 who appeared in Taiwan on Ching Hai Day in October 1995.
Suma Ching Hai USA 100,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) [Orig. source: "Unusual Cast of Asian Donors Emerges in DNC Funding Controversy " in the Jan 27, 1997 issue of The Washington Post] Buddhism:
According to the article, however, Suma Ching Hai has 100,000 followers in the United States and millions more worldwide.
Suma Ching Hai world 2,000,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) [Orig. source: "Unusual Cast of Asian Donors Emerges in DNC Funding Controversy " in the Jan 27, 1997 issue of The Washington Post]` Buddhism:
According to the article, however, Suma Ching Hai has 100,000 followers in the United States and millions more worldwide.
Summum world 400,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Rayburn, Jim. "Has Ogden created a forum for religion? " in Deseret News, 16 Oct. 1999 (v. online). "A religious group that wants to erect a monument espousing its 'Seven Aphorisms' on the grounds of the Ogden Municipal Building says the city 'created a forum for religious expression' when it allowed the Eagles club more than two decades ago to donate and erect a Ten Commandments monument. Arguing in federal court Friday,... Brian Barnard, representing the religious group Summum, said the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled last year that when Salt Lake County allowed a Ten Commandments monument on its property that it created a 'limited public forum' that allows other similar monuments... Summum, which means 'accumulation of all knowledge,' is a religious organization with several hundred thousand members who believe... The judge also asked Barnard if Summum was really a religious organization or just a philosophical group. The attorney said Summum members worship, meditate and the organization is recognized by state and federal government as a religious organization. "
Sumu Central America 16,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 407-408. "Sumu: Location: Nicaragua; Honduras (Eastern coasts); Population: 13,000-16,000; Religion: Protestantism (Moravian church); Catholicism "; "The Sumu in Nicaragua are mostly adherents of the Moravian Church, a Protestant sect. The Tawahka Sumu in Honduras are mostly Catholic. Although their traditional religion--which involved sun and moon worship and a belief in both benevolent and malevolent spirits--declined with the arrival of Moravian missionaries in the 19th century, some Sumu continue to hold beliefs associated with it. Its holy men, or shamans, were called sukia. "
Sunday Schools United Kingdom: Great Britain 250,000 - - - 1787 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 724. "Sunday Schools... By 1787 such schools had enlisted one quarter of a million students in Great Britain. "
Sunga India - north - - - - -73 B.C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 725. "Sunga. Name of a North Indian dynasty which held power from 185-73 B.C., having its capital at Pataliputra and later at Vidisa. Direct successors to the Buddhist Mauryas, the Sunga were Brahmin reactionaries who instigated a campaign of persecution against the Buddhists. Externally, the dynasty found its main enemy in the Bactrian Greeks, prolonged contact with whom seems to have significantly influenced the art of the period. Plagued by wars with the Greeks and by internal dissolution, the dynasty gave way in 73 B.C. to that of the Kanvas. "
Sunni Afghanistan - 74.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994); pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "
Sunni Afghanistan 19,530,000 90.00% - - 1993 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 15. "Location: Afghanistan; Population: 21.7 million (1993 estimate); Religion: Islam (Sunni, 80-90%; Shi'ah, 10-20%) "
Sunni Afghanistan 19,040,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Sunni Afghanistan 19,939,992 84.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Religions: Sunni Muslim 84%, Shi'a Muslim 15%, other 1%; Total Population: 23,738,085 (July 1997 est.)
Sunni Afghanistan 13,920,000 87.00% - - 1997 Russell, Malcom B. The Middle East and South Asia 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 34. Estimates of % of population in principal religions, & est. 1997 total pop.
Sunni Afghanistan 20,825,596 84.00% - - 1998 *LINK* CIA World Factbook 1998 (viewed June 24, 1999) Religions: Sunni Muslim 84%, Shi'a Muslim 15%, other 1%; Total Population: 24,792,375 (July 1998 est.)
Sunni Algeria - 99.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994); pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "


Sunni, continued

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