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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to affiliated - full communicant, New York

affiliated - full communicant, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
affiliated - full communicant North Carolina 3,004,855 45.30% 11,331
units
- 1990 Ramos, Mary G. (ed). 1996-1997 Texas Almanac. Dallas, TX: Dallas Morning News (1995). [Source: Glenmary: "Churches & Church Membership in the U.S., 1990 "]; pg. 325. Table: "Texas Leads the Nation in Number of Churches, Members "; "Data based on reports from reports from church bodies. "; "Members " in this study includes only communicant, confirmed members with full membership status.
affiliated - full communicant Ohio 2,278,892 21.01% 11,086
units
- 1990 Ramos, Mary G. (ed). 1996-1997 Texas Almanac. Dallas, TX: Dallas Morning News (1995). [Source: Glenmary: "Churches & Church Membership in the U.S., 1990 "]; pg. 325. Table: "Texas Leads the Nation in Number of Churches, Members "; "Data based on reports from reports from church bodies. "; "Members " in this study includes only communicant, confirmed members with full membership status.
affiliated - full communicant Pennsylvania 2,471,624 20.80% 13,284
units
- 1990 Ramos, Mary G. (ed). 1996-1997 Texas Almanac. Dallas, TX: Dallas Morning News (1995). [Source: Glenmary: "Churches & Church Membership in the U.S., 1990 "]; pg. 325. Table: "Texas Leads the Nation in Number of Churches, Members "; "Data based on reports from reports from church bodies. "; "Members " in this study includes only communicant, confirmed members with full membership status.
affiliated - full communicant Texas 5,282,341 31.10% 16,961
units
- 1990 Ramos, Mary G. (ed). 1996-1997 Texas Almanac. Dallas, TX: Dallas Morning News (1995). [Source: Glenmary: "Churches & Church Membership in the U.S., 1990 "]; pg. 325. Table: "Texas Leads the Nation in Number of Churches, Members "; "Data based on reports from reports from church bodies. "; "Members " in this study includes only communicant, confirmed members with full membership status.
affiliated - full communicant Texas 5,282,341 31.10% - - 1990 Ramos, Mary G. (ed). 1996-1997 Texas Almanac. Dallas, TX: Dallas Morning News (1995). [Source: Glenmary: "Churches & Church Membership in the U.S., 1990 "]; pg. 325-327. Table: "Religious Groups, Members/Adherents, In Texas, 1990 "; pg. 7: Texas pop. (1990 U.S. census): 16,986,335; "Data based on reports from 133 church bodies. "; This figure is from MEMBERS column ( "Members " in this study includes only communicant, confirmed members with full membership status), not the more inclusive "adherents " column.
Africa Evangelical Church Botswana - - - - 1999 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "We [SIM International] are now working with the Africa Evangelical Church (AEC) to reach the San (Bushman) people of the Kalahari Desert, distribute Bibles and Christian literature through Lesedi Christian Center, and train leaders both locally and at the Shashe Bible Training College. "
Africa Evangelical Church Malawi - - - - 1999 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Africa Evangelical Fellowship missionaries have been serving in Malawi since 1900. Today, most of our missionaries work directly with the Africa Evangelical Church in evangelism and leadership training ministries, while others are involved with evangelism among the unreached Yao people and at the Likubula Bible Institute in Blantyre-a vital ministry in the training of pastors. "
Africa Evangelical Church Swaziland - - - - 1999 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "AEF began its ministry in Swaziland in 1890. An important emphasis of the early work was schools, which are now managed by the Africa Evangelical Church. "
Africa Evangelical Church Zimbabwe - - - - 1997 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "The Africa Evangelical Church (the autonomous association of churches that has grown out of the work of AEF) held its centenary in 1997. "
Africa Evangelical Fellowship Africa - - - - 1998 *LINK* "Merger - On Vision, One Mission " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "On October 1, 1998, SIM entered into a historic merger with Africa Evangelical Fellowship (AEF), the third major merger in SIM's 105-year history. But maybe merger isn't the best word to describe these three transactions. Perhaps 'marriage' would be a better choice, because in each case, the two truly became one. "
Africa Evangelical Fellowship Africa - - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Christian Missions "; web page: "SIM History " (viewed 6 July 1999). "The most recent addition occurred in 1998 when AEF (Africa Evangelical Fellowship) merged with SIM. AEF officially began its work in Cape Town, South Africa, in 1889 as the South Africa General Mission under the leadership of Andrew Murray, Mrs. Osborne, Spencer Walton, and George Howe. Starting from urban South Africa, missionary efforts spread into many of the other countries and people groups of southern Africa. "
Africa Evangelical Fellowship Madagascar - - - - 1987 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Africa Evangelical Fellowship missionaries entered Madagascar in 1987 to work with another mission group in a medical and agricultural ministry. "
Africa Evangelical Fellowship Malawi - - - - 1900 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Africa Evangelical Fellowship missionaries have been serving in Malawi since 1900. "
Africa Evangelical Fellowship Mauritius - - 6
units
- 1999 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Mauritius is a predominantly Hindu country, with evangelical Christians accounting for less than three percent of the population. Africa Evangelical Fellowship was invited to the island in 1969 and has planted churches in Rose-belle, Rose Hill, Flacq, Vacoas, Petit Paquet, and Blue Bay (an English-speaking church, mainly for expatriates), which are registered individually with the government. They are known as the Mauritian Evangelical Churches (MEC). "
Africa Evangelical Fellowship Mozambique - - - - 1936 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "AEF missionaries arrived in Mozambique in 1936, were expelled in 1960, and returned in 1985. "
Africa Evangelical Fellowship Namibia - - - - 1970 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "AEF began its work in 1970 with outreach to youth, especially among the Herero people. This resulted in a flourishing church in Windhoek, the capital city. Work began in northern Namibia in 1981 among Angolan refugees along the northern border. "
Africa Evangelical Fellowship South Africa - - - - 1889 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "The work of Africa Evangelical Fellowship began in 1889, growing from a ministry to military personnel to church planting among both African and Asian people. "
Africa Evangelical Fellowship Swaziland - - - - 1890 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "AEF began its ministry in Swaziland in 1890. An important emphasis of the early work was schools, which are now managed by the Africa Evangelical Church. Though we no longer have missionaries in Swaziland, we maintain contact with the Church for fellowship and further joint ministry should the opportunity or need arise. "
Africa Evangelical Fellowship Zambia - - - - 1910 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Africa Evangelical Fellowship entered Zambia in 1910 and began working among the Kaonde people in the northwest. More than 600 congregations, which now make up the Evangelical Church of Zambia (ECZ), grew out of this ministry. "
Africa Evangelical Fellowship Zimbabwe - - - - 1897 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "The Africa Evangelical Church (the autonomous association of churches that has grown out of the work of AEF) held its centenary in 1997. "
Africa Inland Church Kenya - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 230, 232. "Currently, nearly everyone professes to being a member of some organized religion--either Christianity or Islam. Major Christian sects include the Africa Inland Church (AIC), the Church of the Province of Kenya (CPK), and the Roman Catholic Church. "
Africa Inland Church Namibia - - - - 1999 *LINK* "Southern Africa " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Today, [AEF/SIM's] our missionaries work alongside Africa Inland Mission (AIM) missionaries at the Namibia Evangelical Theological Seminary in Windhoek, the Evangelical Bible Institute at Rundu, with churches along the Caprivi Strip, and in several secondary schools. "
Africa Inland Church Tanzania 180,000 - - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD, 1979); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Denominations 18. Biggest: Lutherans 580,000 adherents; Anglicans 570,000; Moravians 100,000; Africa Inland Church (AIM) 180,000 Evangelicals 9%.
African Baptist Assembly, Malawi Malawi 56,844 - 784
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "; [Listed in table as "African Baptist Assembly, Malawi, Inc. "]
African indigenous churches Africa - - - - 1984 Mbiti, John S. Introduction to African Religion (Second Edition), Heinemann Educational Books: Portsmouth, New Hampshire (1991); pg. 183. "African Independent (or Indigenous) Churches... first appeared in 1819, but.. proliferated to the extent that, in 1984 there were some 7,000 such churches, groups & religious organizations. " Vary from few thousand members to several million members.
African indigenous churches Africa 32,000,000 - - - 1986 *LINK* web site: "University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg "; web page: "The African Initiated Churches - Affirming the Identity, Channelling the Power " (Viewed 2 Feb. 1999); Author: Godfrey Ngumi. [Orig. source: Mbiti, S. J. Bible Theology in African Christianity, Nairobi: Oxford University Press (1986).] "In spite of the fact that African Initiated Churches command a following of over 32 million members [Mbiti: 1986], their history, structure, and impact on Christian theology is still underscored. "
African indigenous churches Africa - - - - 1994 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994); pg. 245. "There are now over 5,000 independent Christian denominations, all born in the twentieth century, and all bearing the familiar marks of pentecostal spirituality, plus many distinctive qualities of their own. "
African indigenous churches Africa - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "AFRICAN INDEPENDENT CHURCH: since the late nineteenth century thousands of NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS have developed in Africa all of which claim to be CHRISTIAN yet they reject traditional MISSIONARY Churches and attempt to incorporate many TRADITIONAL African BELIEFS and practices into their WORSHIP and THEOLOGY. Most of these Churches are thoroughly Christian although some are clearly closer to AFRICAN TRADITIONAL RELIGIONS than to CHRISTIANITY. "
African indigenous churches Africa - - 8,000
units
- 1999 Shillinger, Kurt (Globe Correspondent). "Africans embrace Christian faith, with native touch " in Boston Globe (page A01, 01/03/99). [Posted to Nurel-l newslist by Frank Kaufmann]; Dateline: Harare, Zimbabwe. "Between 5,000 and 8,000 indigenous African churches are spread across sub-Saharan Africa. All were started this century. Six of those congregations worship in a small field here [dateline = HARARE, Zimbabwe], each under its own tree, as often as three times a week. "
African indigenous churches Africa - - - - 2000 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994); pg. 246. "In addition to the several thousand denominations, ranging in size from a few thousand to millions of members, there are also innumerable unaffiliated congregations. At present rates of growth, by the year 2000 these churches will include more members in Africa than either the Roman Catholic Church or all the Protestant denominations put together. "
African indigenous churches Africa - East - - - - 1986 East Africa (series: Library of Nations). By the editors of Time-Life Books. Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1986); pg. 136. "In addition to their Catholic and Protestant communities, East African cities have also witnessed a remarkable flowering of independent Christian churches, formed almost entirely by charismatic preachers who have split away from the missions. They offer a form of Christianity geared towards traditional African life. They often accept polygamous marriages... Rejecting Western culture, they often avoid the prosperous city centres... "
African indigenous churches Africa - sub-Saharan 15,000,000 6.75% - - 1980 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 178. "By 1980 there were about 100 million Christians in sub-Saharan Africa... Christians now number between 40 and 45 percent of the total population of this area. The fastest growing churches are called 'African Independent Churches' because their origins lie within Africa rather than outside. These churches now account for 10 to 15 percent of all Christians south of the Sahara and must be seen in part as a product of the ambiguous colonial alliance of cross and sword. On the one hand are those Independent Churches with nationalist origins which separated from mission churches because the foreign missionary personnel resisted the relinquishing of power to African leadership. These churches retain many characteristics of missionary Christianity. More numerous, on the other hand, are those Independent Churches which resulted from prophetic visions on the part of extraordinary African personalities. "
African indigenous churches Angola - 5.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; listed as "Indigenous Sects "
African indigenous churches Benin - 2.30% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
African indigenous churches Botswana 170,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; listed as "African Christian "
African indigenous churches Botswana - 5.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site; (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) African Independent Churches (16) 5%. Protestants 26%. Community 172,000. Denominations 16. Largest -Congregational (LMS) 20,000. Lutheran 50,000; Dutch Reformed Church in Africa (DRC) 21,000; Assemblies of God 3,000; Baptists 800. Evangelicals 3%.
African indigenous churches Botswana - 35.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
African indigenous churches Central African Republic - 1.00% - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: STL Publications, P. O. Box 48, Bromley, Kent, England 1979); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total Population: 2,370,000. African Independent Churches 1%.
African indigenous churches Cote d'Ivoire - 4.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
African indigenous churches Gabon 120,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; listed as "African Christian "
African indigenous churches Ghana 2,408,000 14.00% - - 1994 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies 17.2 million [total pop.] (mid-1994).1985 est.: 62% Christian, 15% Muslim, 22% indigenous or nonbelievers. Christians: Protestants (25%, esp. Methodists & Presbyterians), Roman Catholics (15%), Pentecostals (8%), & Independent African Churches (about 14%)
African indigenous churches Ghana 4,960,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; listed as "African Christian "
African indigenous churches Ghana - 16.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
African indigenous churches Kenya 4,620,000 - - - 1986 East Africa (series: Library of Nations). By the editors of Time-Life Books. Amsterdam: Time-Life Books (1986); pg. 8. "In Kenya, for example, almost one in three of the nation's 14 million Christians belongs to one of 200 or so African independent churches. "
African indigenous churches Kenya - - - - 1986 Mazrui, Ali A. The Africans: A Triple Heritage. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Company (1986); pg. 155. "Kenya and Uganda also contain a variety of syncretist churches, founded by prophets, rejecting foreign guidance and emphasising African cultural practices. "
African indigenous churches Kenya 5,130,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; listed as "African Christian "
African indigenous churches Kenya - 11.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
African indigenous churches Lesotho - 11.00% - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD, 1979 edition.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total pop.: 1,100,000. African Independent Churches (210) 11%.
African indigenous churches Lesotho - 13.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
African indigenous churches Liberia - 13.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
African indigenous churches Malawi - 19.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
African indigenous churches Mozambique - 5.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
African indigenous churches Namibia - 6.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
African indigenous churches Nigeria 8,990,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; listed as "African Christian "
African indigenous churches Nigeria - - - - 1998 *LINK* Atansuyi, H. Olu. "Gospel and Culture from the Perspective of African Instituted Churches " in Cyberjournal for Pentecostal Charismatic Research (viewed 11 March 1999). "Barely a century ago, African Instituted Churches, a sacred people of God, came to bear witness of the Light, that, through them, people of their race might believe. In Nigeria, these African Instituted Churches are: Cherubim and Seraphim, founded by St. Moses Orimolade Tunolase; Church of the Lord (Aladura), founded by Primate Dr. Josiah Olunowo Oshitelu; Christ Apostolic Church, founded by Pastor/Prophet Joseph Ayo Babalola; Celestial Church of Christ, founded by Revd/Pastor Samuel B.J. Oshofa. "
African indigenous churches Nigeria 11,840,200 10.60% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 330. "Location: Nigeria; Population: 111.7 million "; "Nigerians widely hold to their traditional African religious beliefs in addition to subscribing to various branches of Islam and Christianity... Muslims now constitute 45% of the population... Currently, Protestants account for 26.35%, Catholics 12.1%, and African Christian 10.6% of the population. "
African indigenous churches Nigeria - 10.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
African indigenous churches Nigeria: Ibadan 2,000 - - - 1950 Hallett, Robin. Africa Since 1875: A Modern History; Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press (1974); pg. 336. "the mission churches, with more than 8,000 adult members, enjoyed four times more support than the sects. "
African indigenous churches South Africa 1,500,000 - 2,400
units
- 1938 Hallett, Robin. Africa Since 1875: A Modern History; Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press (1974); pg. 656. "separatist churches in South Africa. 20 years later--so rapid had been the process of fragmentation--the number had increased to 2,400, with a total membership of 1.5 million, 20% of African Christians in the Republic. "
African indigenous churches South Africa - - 500
units
- 1938 Hallett, Robin. Africa Since 1875: A Modern History; Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press (1974); pg. 656. "By 1938 there were over 500 separatist churches in South Africa. "
African indigenous churches South Africa 1,000,000 - - - 1968 Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 546. "By the late 1960's it was reported that in South Africa there were over two thousand independent churches with over a million followers. "
African indigenous churches South Africa - 20.00% - - 1978 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD by P. J. Johnstone; STL Publications, P. O. Box 48, Bromley, Kent, England. Published in 1978.); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: 26,100,000. African Independent Churches 20% (approx. 4,500 [churches]).
African indigenous churches South Africa - - - - 1994 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Southern Africa (PCSA) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Country information: Population (1994 United Nations estimate): South Africa: 40.6 million... Main religions: South Africa: Christianity (76.7%). Independent Christianity, drawing on traditional African religion and culture, is growing rapidly... "
African indigenous churches South Africa - 17.50% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
African indigenous churches South Africa - blacks - 33.00% - - 1994 Cox, Harvey. Fire from Heaven: The Rise of Pentecostal Spirituality and the Reshaping of Religion in the Twenty-First Century; New York: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. (1994); pg. 245. "There are now over 5,000 independent Christian denominations, all born in the twentieth century... In South Africa they embrace about 40% of the black population. "; [U.S. gov. World Factbook 1997: South Africa: "Ethnic groups: black 75.2%, white 13.6%, Colored 8.6%, Indian 2.6% "


African indigenous churches, continued

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