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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Shakers, world

Shakers, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Shakers world 6,000 - 20
units
- 1840 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 674. "Among those affected by Revivalism the [Shaker] movement spread [from New York] to much of New England and then to Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana. The Shakers reached their apogee between 1830 and 1850, with roughly six thousand members in twenty communities, and have since declined to the point of virtual extinction. "
Shakers world 6,000 - - - 1840 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 188. "They [Shakers] numbered about 6000 in 1840, but now have less than 100 members in five surviving communities. "
Shakers world - - 18
units
1
country
1840 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 11. "At one time they numbered in the thousands, their membership peaking in the decades just before the Civil War, with Shaker villages spread from Maine to western Indiana... [in] eighteen villages... "
Shakers world - - 1
unit
- 1847 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "SHAKERS: originating in a QUAKER REVIVAL meeting in 1847... They came under the leadership of... ANN LEE... She eventually emigrated to America with her followers in 1774 where they established several colonies... Among their many achievements is the invention of the washing machine. "
Shakers world 3,000 - - - 1850 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 499. "Despite celibacy, the Shakers recruited sufficiently from the outside world to continue through the 19th century and into the 20th. They can rarely have numbered more than 3000 at any one time and there probably cannot have been more than about 16,500 of them altogether during the movement's entire life. "
Shakers world 3,489 - - 1
country
1860 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997). [Orig. source: Steven J. Stein in The Shaker Experience in America: A History of the United Society of Believers (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1992), pg. 203, 243.]; pg. 37. "The number of Shakers on the membership list slipped from 3,627 in 1840, to 3,489 in 1860, to 1,849 in 1880, and only 855 at the turn of the century. "
Shakers world 1,849 - - 1
country
1880 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997). [Orig. source: Steven J. Stein in The Shaker Experience in America: A History of the United Society of Believers (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1992), pg. 203, 243.]; pg. 37. "The number of Shakers on the membership list slipped from 3,627 in 1840, to 3,489 in 1860, to 1,849 in 1880, and only 855 at the turn of the century. "
Shakers world 855 - - 1
country
1900 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997). [Orig. source: Steven J. Stein in The Shaker Experience in America: A History of the United Society of Believers (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1992), pg. 203, 243.]; pg. 37. "The number of Shakers on the membership list slipped from 3,627 in 1840, to 3,489 in 1860, to 1,849 in 1880, and only 855 at the turn of the century. "
Shakers world - - 6
units
1
country
1925 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 38. "By 1925, only six Shaker villages remained: the original settlement near Albany (by this time known as Watervliet) and the settlements at New Lebanon [New York]; Hancock [Massachusetts]; Canterbury, New Hampshire; Alfred, Maine; and Sabbathday Lake, Maine. "
Shakers world 100 - 5
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 188. "They [Shakers] numbered about 6000 in 1840, but now have less than 100 members in five surviving communities. "
Shakers world - - 4
units
1
country
1946 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 93. "In 1947, New Lebanon, now known as Mount Lebanon, closed, its sisters moving to Hancock, Massachusetts. The Great Depression of the 1930s hastened the difficult situation of the sect, and Canterbury in New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake were the only other remaining Shaker villages. "
Shakers world - - 3
units
1
country
1947 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 93. "In 1947, New Lebanon, now known as Mount Lebanon, closed, its sisters moving to Hancock, Massachusetts. The Great Depression of the 1930s hastened the difficult situation of the sect, and Canterbury in New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake were the only other remaining Shaker villages. "
Shakers world 40 - - 1
country
1952 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 93. "There were forty Shakers left in the early 1950s, two of whom were brothers. "
Shakers world - - 1
unit
- 1965 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 499. "By the mid-1960s only a few old ladies remained, still living together in the last surviving Shaker community. "
Shakers world - - 2
units
- 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 674. "...Shakers... communities remaining only in Canterbury, New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake, Maine. "
Shakers world - - 2
units
1
country
1991 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 97. "the community at Canterbury [New Hampshire] closed in 1992, today Sabbathday Lake [Maine] is joined by two other young male converts; the eight community members there are headed by Frances Carr... "
Shakers world 7 - - - 1992 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) Today there are seven women living in small sections of the Canterbury, New Hampshire and Sabbath Day Lake, ME community. At their peak membership between 1830 and 1840, there were 6,000 Shakers in 19 communities (Melton 1992)
Shakers world - - 1
unit
1
country
1992 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 97. "the community at Canterbury [New Hampshire] closed in 1992, today Sabbathday Lake [Maine] is joined by two other young male converts; the eight community members there are headed by Frances Carr... "
Shakers world - - 1
unit
- 1993 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. v. "The last Shaker at the Canterbury, New Hampshire, branch died in September 1992, at the age of ninety-six. The remaining branch in Sabbathday Lake, Maine, has only a handful of members. "
Shakers world 6 - 1
unit
1
country
1995 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 38. "By the mid-1990s, only Sabbathday Lake [Maine] remained as an active community, with only a half dozen living as Shakers there. "
Shakers world 8 - - 1
country
1997 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 11. "Today there are eight Believers in the Society [I.e., the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, I.e. the Quakers], still living in what was once considered the least of the eighteen villages, at Sabbathday Lake, Maine. "
Shakers world 8 - 1
unit
1
country
1997 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 97. "the community at Canterbury [New Hampshire] closed in 1992, today Sabbathday Lake [Maine] is joined by two other young male converts; the eight community members there are headed by Frances Carr... "
Shakers world 7 - - - 1998 Guiness Book of World Records 1999. New York: Guiness Publishing Group (1998); pg. 91. Listed in Guiness Book of World Records as "World's Smallest Christian Sect " with 7 members left.
Shakers (Squaxin) Oregon - - - - 1900 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2172. "...peyotism... met the opposition of the Department of Indian Affairs at an early date, and the consumption of the drug was prohibited by a number of states... In response... the votaries of peyote saw the necessity of organizing themselves as a recognized Church, a pattern that had been successfully established by the Indian Shaker Church in Oregon some years before. A group... registered... in 1914... "
Shakers (Squaxin) USA - - - - 1881 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 8). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1091. "...the Ghost Dance was foreshadowed by a number of similar movements which had flourished and died throughout the 19th century. Among its forerunners were... the Shakers (not related to the sect of English origin with the same name) founded among the Squaxin tribe in the early 1880s. "
Shaktism India - - - - 1300 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 53. "Alongside Shaivism, especially in the provinces of Bengal, Assam, and Orissa, developed the worship of Shakti--'power' or 'energy' embodied in the female form. Shaktism, also called Tantrism, may extend back to the ancient worship of the Mother Goddess and was expouned in esoteric texts called Tantras. "
Shaktism India - - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 24. "Besides the major Hindu sects of Vishnu and Shiva, there are many minor ones. The strongest, in numbers and influence, is... of Shakti whose followers worship 'God in the aspect of mother.'... divided into two main groups, the Dakshinamargis... and Vamamargis... Some of Hinduism's greatest saints and sages, Shankara, Ramakrishna and Vivekananda among them, have been devotees of Shakti, the Divine Mother. "
Shaktism India - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 313. "Shaktism, also called Tantrism; one of the major traditions of worship in modern Hinduism. The other two are Vaishnavism and Shaivism. Shaktas worship Shakti and revere her as the force that makes all life possible and maintains the universe. "
Shaktism India - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 54. "The center of Shaktism today is Kamarupa in the province of Assam. "
Shaktism India: Assam - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 54. "The center of Shaktism today is Kamarupa in the province of Assam. "
shamanism Korea, North - - - - 1944 Belke, Thomas J. Juche: A Christian Study of North Korea's State Religion. Bartlesville, OK: Living Sacrifice Books Co. (1999); pg. 3. "Before 1945, Korean religion was dominated by a mixture of Confucian thought, Buddhism, and shamanism... "
shamanism Korea, South 70,000 - - - 1985 *LINK* web page: "Fortunetelling in Korea, Inc. " (viewed 15 April 1999). Author: Alexander Cho. "Stockholm School of Economics & EIJS, 1997 " "Shamanism underwent a revival during the 1980s and a national Shaman-association registered 70,000 due paying members in the mid 80s. Chun Do Hwan, the Korean president during 1980-1988 stressed the preservation of ancient cultural traditions. "
shamanism Korea, South 2,230,000 5.00% - - 1994 *LINK* Web site: "Council for World Mission "; web page: "Presbyterian Church of Korea (PCK) " (viewed 31 May 1999). "Population (1994 United Nations estimate): 44.6 million... Main religions: Christianity (20%), Buddhism (30%), Shamanism (5%), Confucianism (5%), non-religious and culturalised Confucianism (40%)... "
shamanism Korea, South - 10.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "
shamanism Korea, South - - - - 1998 Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 210. "If one could peer into the souls of Korean people, one would find fascinating elements of shamanism, the folk worship of a pantheon of household, village and animate and inanimate forces of nature. Koreans, like other Asians, maintain ancient traditions such as the kut, or exorcising ceremonies. These practices have not been fully institutionalized into a religion, but shamanism has been kept very much alive in Korea--as in the deification of Sanshin, a non-Buddhist mountain god, who has found his way into special shrines located within the courtyards of Buddhist temple complexes. "
shamanism Scandinavia - - - - 1800 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 12). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1605. "Perhaps the most striking Lappish cult -- certainly the best known -- was what we call shamanism. The noaide or shaman acted as an intermediary between the world of man and the supernatural... By the 19th century it had virtually disappeared but a number of examples are preserved in Scandinavian museums. "
shamanism world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 677. "When by narrow definition shamanism is restricted to Asia, scholarly concern has been focused upon its origin. Philogists have speculated that the Tungusic word saman may have derived from the Pali samana through the Chinese sha-men... suggest[ing] that shamanism in Siberia may have derived from... south Asia and India. This was discounted for a while, but recent research has revived this possibility. Other evidence suggests that some of the symbolism of Tungus shamanism has been influenced by Buddhism... In terms of the broader definition of shamanism which does not restrict it to Asia, other striking factors must be considered... shamanic ideologies & techniques are documented among nonliterate peoples all over the world. For example, there are remarkable similarities in certain elements of the shamanic mythologies and techniques of the peoples of Australia, Siberia, South America, & many other areas which have had no likelihood of contact for millennia. "
shamanism world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 674-675. "Shamanism. Commonly used to refer to the ideas, practices & beliefs associated with individuals (...shamans) who show evidence of magical or spiritual powers... 'shaman' is derived through Russian from the Siberian Tungusic saman, and... there are in the languages of many of the peoples indigenous to Siberia and Central Asia cognate words denoting specific magico-religious practices... In a technical sense shamanism is a specific form of religious practice confined to this geographic area. An enormous amount of study has been directed to these practices, primarily by Russian ethnologists and philologists... In Western scholarship, particularly that concerned with the study of religion, Eliade's definition of shamansim as 'techniques of ecstasy' has become broadly accepted.... permits the term 'shamanism' to refer to certain magico-religious elements found in the religions of many nonliterate peoples and in world religions that arose in both the East and the West. "
shamanism world - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "Shamanism is widespread in most traditional religions. The shaman is specially gifted with the ability to communicate with the spiritual world. Since the unseen spiritual forces are recognized as in control of many phenomena on earth, a shaman may be called upon to heal physical and mental illness, to ferret out criminals, or to discover the reason for bad luck. The shaman may go into a trance for many hours, accompanied by dancing and the presentation of ritual objects. Other participants may join in the trance as well, as they try to cure the afflicted soul. "
shamanism world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "SHAMANISM: the indigenous RELIGION of Northern Eurasia where trance and the control of SPIRITS by exceptional individuals or SHAMEN who negotiate between this world and the spirit world is a central feature. Shamanism is found among hunting peoples and presupposes a BELIEF in a multiplicity of spirits and the survival of the SOUL after death. As a coherent religious system it is practically extinct although a REVIVAL of interest in Shamanism has occurred in various NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS including the UNIFICATION CHURCH and, in a certain sense, SCIENTOLOGY. "
shamanism world 12,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998) [Original sources: J.W. Wright, Editor, The Universal Almanac, 1996, Andrews & McMeel, Kansas City. Greg H. Parsons, Executive Director, "U.S. Center for World Mission, " Pasadena, CA; quoted in Zondervan News Service, 1997-FEB-21.] Table: "Number of Adherents of World Religions "; listed in table as "Shamanists "
Shambaa Tanzania - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Shambaa Tanzania 445,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 377-378. "Shambaa: Alternate Names: Shambala (Bantu people); Location: Shambaai (West Usambara mountain range -- northeastern Tanzania); Population: 445,000; Religion: Traditional Shambaa beliefs (healing the land and the body), Mufika (ancestor worship), Christianity, Islam "; Pg. 378: "The Protestant and Catholic faiths are both well established in Shambaai... It has brought changes to traditional Shambaa beliefs and practices, which have been weakened and adapted to the newer Christian beliefs. Islam was spread in Shambaai by the Zigua, mainly in the trading towns. "
Shan Myanmar 4,000,000 8.89% - - 1996 *LINK* Website: New Internationalist Magazine; webpage: "A Kaleidoscope of peoples " (viewed 17 April 2005). New Internationalist Magazine, Issue 280. Copyright: New Internationalist 1996 "Burma... population of around 45 million...

Ethnic nationality: Shan.
Population: between 3.5 and 4 million

The Shan are predominantly Buddhist and have played an important role in shaping the mystique of Burma. Living several thousand feet above sea-level, amid the pine forests, waterfalls and freshwater lakes of Shan State, they traditionally favour a life of simplicity and spirituality. Buddhist temples and pagodas dot the crests of their rugged hills. A local subgroup, the Intha people of Inle Lake, are famous for their leg-rowing technique. "

Shan Myanmar 8,000,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "The Shan People consist of 8 million people in eastern Burma in a territory, which borders to Thailand, Laos and China. Just as the case with the Mon and the Karenni, the Burmese central power is the main enemy in the struggle for self-determination. "
Shan Myanmar 2,700,000 6.00% - - 1997 Leibo, Steven A. East, Southeast Asia, and the Western Pacific 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 91. "Population: 45 million... Ethnic Background: Oriental Mongoloid mixtures, including Burman (72%) in the central valley area,... Shan (6% - in the Shan Plateau and Chindwin Valley)... "
Shangaan Mozambique - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Shango Grenada - - - - 1993 Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 2. "...Yoruba-based religious forms that exist in the Caribbean, in Central & South America... Santeria is the Cuban variant of this tradition. Shango in Trinidad and on Grenada, Xango and Candomble in Brazil, and Kele on St. Lucia are other examples... "
Shango Grenada - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 195-196. "Shango, a traditional African religion, is still practiced, generally in combination with Christian beliefs. African practices are especially prominent on Carriacou, and the mingling of Christian and African traditions can be seen in the island's boat-christening ceremonies, which combine holy water, sacrificial goats, and African-derived Big Drum music. "
Shango Trinidad - - - - 1993 Brandon, George. Santeria from Africa to the New World: Dead Sell Memories. Bloomington and Indiana: Indiana University Press (1993); pg. 2. "...Yoruba-based religious forms that exist in the Caribbean, in Central & South America... Santeria is the Cuban variant of this tradition. Shango in Trinidad and on Grenada, Xango and Candomble in Brazil, and Kele on St. Lucia are other examples... "
Shango Trinidad and Tobago - - - - 1998 Davis, Rod. American Voudou: Journey Into A Hidden World. Denton, Texas: University of North Texas Press (1998); pg. 9. "In different areas, voudou has different rituals and doctrines, running a sectarian range roughly comparable to that from Judaism through Protestantism to Catholicism. In Haiti, the religion metamorphosed into vodun or vaudoux; in Cuba, santeria, in Brazil, candomble; in Trinidad, Shango Baptist; in Mexico, curanderismo; in Jamaica, obeah. In the American South, it became voodoo and, in the most extreme caricature, hoodoo... "
Shango Trinidad and Tobago - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 423-424. "There are also religious sects that combine Christianity with African religious beliefs and practices. The best known of these is Shango, based on a religion practiced by the Yoruba tribe in Africa, that embraces both Shango, god of thunder lightning, and Christian saints. Through dance and drumming, its priests, called mogbas, summon spirits known as orishas. "
Shankili Ethiopia - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Shasta North America - Pacific Coast 2,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Shasta world 2,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Shattari Asia - Southeast - - - - 1700 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 722. "The time of greatest influence for the Sufi orders... Ottoman and Mogul empires... 1500-1800. The number of Muslims affiliated with Sufi brotherhoods during this period was certainly not less than half the population and may have been as high as 80 percent... Distant Southeast Asia withstood any wide-scale Islamization until the late sixteenth century. But it as Qadiri and Shattari masters who succeeded in penetrating the complex Hindu-Javanese belief system of the archipelago. " [Different from Shadhili/Shadhiliyaa? "Shadhiliyaa " is mentioned a few sentences prior.]
Shawnee North America - Southeastern Woodlands 3,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Shawnee Oklahoma 2,600 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 31. "Shawnee... Descendants live on a reservation in Oklahoma (pop. 2,600). "
Shawnee USA 6,179 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Shawnee world 3,000 - - - 1650 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Sheilaism USA 1 - - - 1992 Bloom, Harold. The American Religion: The Emergence of the Post-Christian Nation. New York: Simon & Schuster (1992); pg. 25. "In their chapter on religion, Bellah and his colleagues present us with 'Sheilaism,' named for a young nurse they call Sheila Larson. 'Sheilaism' urges us to love ourselves and be gentle with ourselves, a benign doctrine surely. Bellah's group rather gently chides this benignity, since Sheilaism would make us a nation of two hundred and fifty million sects... "
Sheilaism world 1 - - - 1985 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993). [Orig. source: Robert N. Bellah et al., Habits of the Heart: Individualism and Commitment in American Life (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1985), pp. viii, 220-21.]; pg. 45. "An interviewee named Sheila Larson described her faith as 'Sheilaism': 'I believe in God. I'm not a religious fanatic. I can't remember the last time I went to church. My faith has carried me a long way. It's Sheilaism. Just my own little voice.' "
Shen-hsiao China - - - - 1150 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 745. "Between 1100 and 1400 three developments occurred that have helped shape modern Taoism... The second was the rise of anew sect called Shen-hsiao ('Divine Empyrean'), after the new higher heavenly realm and the new age of divine rule that it revealed. The rituals which Shen-hsiao introduced remain among the most popular traditions today. "
Sherbo Africa - West - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Sherente Brazil - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "


Sherente, continued

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