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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Shafii Islam, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Shaftsbury Baptist Association USA - - - - 1781 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 110. "In 1781 the Shaftsbury Association brought together a number of Baptist churches in southern Vermont, western Massachusetts and the eastern areas of New York state. In 1785 the Groton Conference was organized to serve many of the Baptist churches of Connecticut. "
Shaiva-Siddhanta India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 641. "Saiva Siddhanta (Sanskrit.; lit. 'the Tenets of the Devotees of Shiva). An influential medieval school of Hinduism, concentrated primarily in south India (especially in Medras State) and represented primarily through the medium of Tamil language and literature. This is one of the four Saiva sects which follow either the Vedas or the Sanskrit and Tamil Agamas ('traditional' texts) or both. "
Shaiva-Siddhanta India - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 312. "Shaiva-Siddhanta, Skt., lit. 'the highest goal of the Shaivas'; name given to the South Indian movement Shaivism, which resembles the Vishishtadvaita-Vedanta (qualified nondualism) of Ramanuja... "
Shaiva-Siddhanta India - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 312. "Shaivism, or Shivaism; one of the three major devotional movements in modern-day Hinduism. The other two are Vaishnavism and Shaktism. Shaivas view Shiva as the supreme being... Shaivism in South India is called Shaiva-Siddhanta; Shaivism in Kashmir is called Pratyabhijna. "
Shaiva-Siddhanta world 750,000 - - - 1994 *LINK* "Saivism: Six Schools " in Hinduism Today International (March 1994) "Today there are perhaps 750,000 adherents of Siddha Siddhanta Saivism, who are often understood as Shaktas or advaita tantrics. "
Shaiva-Siddhanta world - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 53. "The most important Shaivite subsect, Shaiva-Siddhanta, founded in the 13th century, emphasized divine grace and the conditional split between Brahman and Atman. Its main text is the Shaiva-Siddhanta-Shastra. "
Shaivism Cambodia - - - - 1250 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 51. "An inscription from the year 791 found in the neighborhood of Angkor Wat bears witness to the existence of the Mahayan in Cambodia. The country was also under the influence of Shaivism. The synthesis that developed out of the mixture of the two religions was characterized by the cult of the bodhisattva Lokeshvara, a fusion of Avalokiteshvara and Shiva. Later the Shaivite element seems to have been eliminated. However, again in the 13th century an upsurge of the Shiva cult took place, in the course of which the Buddhist sangha was exposed to severe persecution. "
Shaivism India - - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973); pg. 165. "Shaivas or Saivas, members of that branch of Hinduism which looks on the god Shiva as ultimate... They are divided into several sects, and their temples are found all over India, but they are strongest in the peninsula, especially in Madras State and Kashmir. "
Shaivism India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 642. "Saivism... The English designation for a number of distinct but related communities in India who worship Shiva (Siva) in his many forms as the chief among the gods or as a Supreme Deity. Since the word refers to a loosely allied network of cults and not to a single religious community, there is no equivalent term in any Indian language. Saivism is predominant in south India, particularly in Madras State. "
Shaivism India - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 312. "Shaivism, or Shivaism; one of the three major devotional movements in modern-day Hinduism. The other two are Vaishnavism and Shaktism. Shaivas view Shiva as the supreme being...Shaivism in South India is called Shaiva-Siddhanta; Shaivism in Kashmir is called Pratyabhijna. "
Shaivism India - - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 194. "Shaivism is a more coherent entity than Vaishnavism, but there are several different schools with their own teachings, in particular the monistic school of Kashmir Shaivism and the south Indian school of Shaiva Siddhanta... Another separate group is represented by the Virashaivas or Lingayats ('lingam-bearers') of Karnataka, founded in the twelfth century CE. "
Shaivism India - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "SAIVISM: the WORSHIP of SIVA in HINDUISM... appears to have roots in the INDUS VALLEY CIVILIZATION before the ARYAN invasions. "
Shaivism India: Madras - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 642. "Saivism is predominant in south India, particularly in Madras State. "
Shaivism India: Tamil Nadu - - - - 1000 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 51. "By the 7th century AD, a great revival of Shiva worship led to a lessening of Buddhist and Jain influence in India, a process that was aided by the poet-saints of the 7th to 11th centuries... The southern Indian state of Tamilnadu became the stronghold of Shiva worship, or Shaivism, perhaps because of the strong Dravidian presence. "
Shaivism world 195,136,752 3.41% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Hinduism:Shaivite:
"Hindus. 70% Vaishnavites, 25% Shaivites, 2% new-Hindus and reform Hindus. " Hinduism world total: 780,547,000. Total world population: 5,716,425,000.
Shaivism world 198,268,752 3.42% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Hinduism:Shaivite:
"Hindus. 70% Vaishnavites, 25% Shaivites, 2% new-Hindus and reform Hindus. " Hinduism world total: 793,075,000. Total world population: 5,716,425,000.
Shakers Maine - - 2
units
- 1925 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 38. "By 1925, only six Shaker villages remained: the original settlement near Albany [New York] (by this time known as Watervliet) and the settlements at New Lebanon [New York]; Hancock [Massachusetts]; Canterbury, New Hampshire; Alfred, Maine; and Sabbathday Lake, Maine. "
Shakers Maine - - 1
unit
- 1946 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 93. "In 1947, New Lebanon [New York], now known as Mount Lebanon, closed, its sisters moving to Hancock, Massachusetts. The Great Depression of the 1930s hastened the difficult situation of the sect, and Canterbury in New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake [Maine] were the only other remaining Shaker villages. "
Shakers Maine - - 1
unit
- 1947 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 93. "In 1947, New Lebanon [New York], now known as Mount Lebanon, closed, its sisters moving to Hancock, Massachusetts. The Great Depression of the 1930s hastened the difficult situation of the sect, and Canterbury in New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake [Maine] were the only other remaining Shaker villages. "
Shakers Maine - - 1
unit
- 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 674. "...Shakers... communities remaining only in Canterbury, New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake, Maine. "
Shakers Maine - - 1
unit
- 1991 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 97. "the community at Canterbury [New Hampshire] closed in 1992, today Sabbathday Lake [Maine] is joined by two other young male converts; the eight community members there are headed by Frances Carr... "
Shakers Maine - - 1
unit
- 1992 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 97. "the community at Canterbury [New Hampshire] closed in 1992, today Sabbathday Lake [Maine] is joined by two other young male converts; the eight community members there are headed by Frances Carr... "
Shakers Maine - - 1
unit
- 1993 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. v. "The last Shaker at the Canterbury, New Hampshire, branch died in September 1992, at the age of ninety-six. The remaining branch in Sabbathday Lake, Maine, has only a handful of members. "
Shakers Maine 6 - 1
unit
- 1995 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 38. "By the mid-1990s, only Sabbathday Lake [Maine] remained as an active community, with only a half dozen living as Shakers there. "
Shakers Maine 8 - - - 1997 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 11. "Today there are eight Believers in the Society [I.e., the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, I.e. the Quakers], still living in what was once considered the least of the eighteen villages, at Sabbathday Lake, Maine. "
Shakers Maine 8 - 1
unit
- 1997 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 97. "the community at Canterbury [New Hampshire] closed in 1992, today Sabbathday Lake [Maine] is joined by two other young male converts; the eight community members there are headed by Frances Carr... "
Shakers Massachusetts - - 1
unit
- 1925 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 38. "By 1925, only six Shaker villages remained: the original settlement near Albany [New York] (by this time known as Watervliet) and the settlements at New Lebanon [New York]; Hancock [Massachusetts]; Canterbury, New Hampshire; Alfred, Maine; and Sabbathday Lake, Maine. "
Shakers Massachusetts - - 1
unit
- 1946 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 93. "In 1947, New Lebanon [New York], now known as Mount Lebanon, closed, its sisters moving to Hancock, Massachusetts. The Great Depression of the 1930s hastened the difficult situation of the sect, and Canterbury in New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake [Maine] were the only other remaining Shaker villages. "
Shakers Massachusetts - - 1
unit
- 1947 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 93. "In 1947, New Lebanon [New York], now known as Mount Lebanon, closed, its sisters moving to Hancock, Massachusetts. The Great Depression of the 1930s hastened the difficult situation of the sect, and Canterbury in New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake [Maine] were the only other remaining Shaker villages. "
Shakers Massachusetts: Tyringham 17 - - - 1874 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 84. "Charles Nordhoff had counted only seventeen residents at Tyringham [Massachusetts] in 1874. "
Shakers New Hampshire - - 1
unit
- 1925 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 38. "By 1925, only six Shaker villages remained: the original settlement near Albany [New York] (by this time known as Watervliet) and the settlements at New Lebanon [New York]; Hancock [Massachusetts]; Canterbury, New Hampshire; Alfred, Maine; and Sabbathday Lake, Maine. "
Shakers New Hampshire - - 1
unit
- 1946 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 93. "In 1947, New Lebanon [New York], now known as Mount Lebanon, closed, its sisters moving to Hancock, Massachusetts. The Great Depression of the 1930s hastened the difficult situation of the sect, and Canterbury in New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake [Maine] were the only other remaining Shaker villages. "
Shakers New Hampshire - - 1
unit
- 1947 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 93. "In 1947, New Lebanon [New York], now known as Mount Lebanon, closed, its sisters moving to Hancock, Massachusetts. The Great Depression of the 1930s hastened the difficult situation of the sect, and Canterbury in New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake [Maine] were the only other remaining Shaker villages. "
Shakers New Hampshire - - 1
unit
- 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 674. "...Shakers... communities remaining only in Canterbury, New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake, Maine. "
Shakers New Hampshire - - 1
unit
- 1991 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 97. "the community at Canterbury [New Hampshire] closed in 1992, today Sabbathday Lake [Maine] is joined by two other young male converts; the eight community members there are headed by Frances Carr... "
Shakers New Hampshire 1 - - - 1992 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. v. "The last Shaker at the Canterbury, New Hampshire, branch died in September 1992, at the age of ninety-six. The remaining branch in Sabbathday Lake, Maine, has only a handful of members. "
Shakers New Hampshire 0 - - - 1993 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. v. "The last Shaker at the Canterbury, New Hampshire, branch died in September 1992, at the age of ninety-six. The remaining branch in Sabbathday Lake, Maine, has only a handful of members. "
Shakers New York - - 2
units
- 1787 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 674. "Shakers (Christian). A celibate communistic sect founded by Ann Lee (1736-84). Converted in 1758 in England to the Shaking Quakers... Lee received revelations indicating that... she was to take her small group to the New World to establish the millennial church. Shaker communities came into existence in 1787 at New Lebanon and Watervliet, New York. "
Shakers New York - - 2
units
- 1925 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 38. "By 1925, only six Shaker villages remained: the original settlement near Albany (by this time known as Watervliet) and the settlements at New Lebanon [New York]; Hancock [Massachusetts]; Canterbury, New Hampshire; Alfred, Maine; and Sabbathday Lake, Maine. "
Shakers New York - - 1
unit
- 1946 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 93. "In 1947, New Lebanon [New York], now known as Mount Lebanon, closed, its sisters moving to Hancock, Massachusetts. The Great Depression of the 1930s hastened the difficult situation of the sect, and Canterbury in New Hampshire and Sabbathday Lake [Maine] were the only other remaining Shaker villages. "
Shakers Ohio: North Union 50 - - - 1880 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 87. "In 1889, another village closed, in North Union, Ohio. Once two hundred members strong, it had less than one-fourth that number by 1880. "
Shakers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1760 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 499. "The Shakers are perhaps the most celebrated of all the communistic sects. This sect owes its origin to the preaching of refugee French Camisards in 18th century England. They converted some Quakers in Lancashire... In 1770 a woman named Ann Lee became their leader... "
Shakers United Kingdom: England - - - - 1771 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 17. "Ann... [became leader] of the small radical sect, which included her father and brother. The group's worship services at the Wardleys' home could be heard throughout the neighborhood... By the early 1770s... The group included some socially prominent men and eventually even some converted clergymen... She and eight others emigrated to America [in 1774]. "
Shakers USA 9 - - - 1774 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 11. "There are eight of them following the gospel of Ann Lee, just as there were eight who came to America with her in 1774. " [8 plus Ann Lee herself make 9]
Shakers USA 8 - - - 1774 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 499. "Eight Shakers made the journey to America in 1774. "
Shakers USA - - 9
units
- 1795 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 32. "By the 1790s, just ten years after Mother Ann's death, there were nine Shaker villages, including the only one still in existence today, at Sabbathday, Maine. "
Shakers USA 900 - 9
units
- 1800 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 32. "By the 1790s, just ten years after Mother Ann's death, there were nine Shaker villages... By the year 1800, each village had approx. one hundred members. "
Shakers USA - - 19
units
- 1827 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 32. "By the time Wright died, in 1827, several thousand Shakers lived in no fewer than nineteen separate communities. Most of the Shaker communities were clustered in New England, from southern Maine to eastern and central New York. "
Shakers USA - - 18
units
- 1837 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 69. "...1837... Shaker villages (there were eighteen of them at the time... "
Shakers USA 3,627 - - - 1840 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997). [Orig. source: Steven J. Stein in The Shaker Experience in America: A History of the United Society of Believers (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1992), pg. 203, 243.]; pg. 37. "The number of Shakers on the membership list slipped from 3,627 in 1840, to 3,489 in 1860, to 1,849 in 1880, and only 855 at the turn of the century. "
Shakers USA 6,000 - 20
units
- 1840 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 674. "...Shakers reached their apogee between 1830 and 1850, with roughly six thousand members in twenty communities... "
Shakers USA - - 18
units
- 1840 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 11. "At one time they numbered in the thousands, their membership peaking in the decades just before the Civil War, with Shaker villages spread from Maine to western Indiana... [in] eighteen villages... "
Shakers USA 3,600 - - - 1845 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 77. "The Shaker population had peaked in the 1840s, with more than 3,600 members who had signed covenants; it began to dwindle steadily after that. "
Shakers USA 6,000 - - - 1850 Marty, Martin E. Pilgrims in Their Own Land: 500 Years of Religion in America. Boston: Little, Brown and Co. (1984); pg. 192. "Despite such severe practices, between 1830 and 1850 the Shakers attracted as many as six thousand members. "
Shakers USA 6,000 - - - 1850 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 66. "By mid-century, the population of Shaker villages totaled 6,000 (though not all had signed covenants). "
Shakers USA 6,000 - - - 1855 Frankforter, A. Daniel. A History of the Christian Movement; Chicago: Nelson-Hall (1978); pg. 264. "By the 1850's, there were nineteen Shaker settlements scattered about the country, and the movement had a total membership of about 6,000. "
Shakers USA 3,489 - - - 1860 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997). [Orig. source: Steven J. Stein in The Shaker Experience in America: A History of the United Society of Believers (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1992), pg. 203, 243.]; pg. 37. "The number of Shakers on the membership list slipped from 3,627 in 1840, to 3,489 in 1860, to 1,849 in 1880, and only 855 at the turn of the century. "
Shakers USA 2,415 - - - 1874 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 83. "In 1874, a journalist named Charles Nordhoff spent much time with the Shakers while he researched his book, Communistic Societies in the United States... Nordhoff's census count of the United Society of Believers was 1,189 women, 695 men, 339 girls, and 192 boys: just over 2,400 SHaker residents total... "
Shakers USA 1,849 - - - 1880 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997). [Orig. source: Steven J. Stein in The Shaker Experience in America: A History of the United Society of Believers (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1992), pg. 203, 243.]; pg. 37. "The number of Shakers on the membership list slipped from 3,627 in 1840, to 3,489 in 1860, to 1,849 in 1880, and only 855 at the turn of the century. "
Shakers USA 855 - - - 1900 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997). [Orig. source: Steven J. Stein in The Shaker Experience in America: A History of the United Society of Believers (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1992), pg. 203, 243.]; pg. 37. "The number of Shakers on the membership list slipped from 3,627 in 1840, to 3,489 in 1860, to 1,849 in 1880, and only 855 at the turn of the century. "
Shakers USA - - 6
units
- 1925 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 38. "By 1925, only six Shaker villages remained: the original settlement near Albany (by this time known as Watervliet) and the settlements at New Lebanon [New York]; Hancock [Massachusetts]; Canterbury, New Hampshire; Alfred, Maine; and Sabbathday Lake, Maine. "
Shakers USA 8 - - - 1997 Williams, Jean Kinney. The Shakers. Danbury, Connecticut: Franklin Watts (1997); pg. 11. "Today there are eight Believers in the Society [I.e., the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, I.e. the Quakers], still living in what was once considered the least of the eighteen villages, at Sabbathday Lake, Maine. "
Shakers USA - Midwest - - 7
units
- 1827 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 32. "By the time Wright died, in 1827, several thousand Shakers lived in no fewer than nineteen separate communities. Most of the Shaker communities were clustered in New England, from southern Maine to eastern and central New York. However, as a result of the tireless work of David Darrow, the Shakers' other great leader during these years of growth, seven new communites were founded in the Midwest--dotted across Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky. "
Shakers world 11 - - - 1774 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997); pg. 29. "Unlike the Anabaptists, however, [the Shakers] were fewer than a dozen in number when they left England for America in 1774. "
Shakers world 3,627 - - 1
country
1840 Andryszewski, Tricia. Communities of the Faithful: American Religious Movements Outside the Mainstream. Bookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1997). [Orig. source: Steven J. Stein in The Shaker Experience in America: A History of the United Society of Believers (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1992), pg. 203, 243.]; pg. 37. "The number of Shakers on the membership list slipped from 3,627 in 1840, to 3,489 in 1860, to 1,849 in 1880, and only 855 at the turn of the century. "


Shakers, continued

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