Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Separatists, Europe

Separatists, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Separatists Massachusetts - - - - 1620 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 21. "In many ways the history of America was shaped by the actions of groups that could legitimately be defined as cults. The people who called themselves the Pilgrims, who came from Europe aboard the Mayflower and landed in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in the fall of 1620, were a small, radical religious group better known as the Separatists. In the eyes of their contemporaries these Separatists were religious fanatics who fled their homeland to the wilderness so they could practice their own peculiar brand of religion away from the temptations of civilization. "
Separatists Massachusetts 102 - - - 1620 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 347-348. "Puritans. Some membes of the Church of England felt the English Reformation did not go far enough toward purging the ceremonies of the Roman Catholic Church... A small group of radical Puritans insisted on disassociating themselves from the Church of England altogether. Few in number, these Separatists were punished by the Crown and even criticized by some Puritan preachers. In 1620, a group of 102 Separatists known as the Pilgrim Fathers left for America to create a new England and settled in Plymouth, Massachusetts. "
Separatists United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1581 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 405. "The first really conspicuous advocate of Sepaist views in England was Robert Browne (1550-1633), a student in Cambridge in the troublous time of Cartwright's brief professorship, and a graduate there in 1572. At first an advanced Presbyterian Puritan, he came to adopt Separatist principles by about 1850, and in connection with a friend, Robert Harrison, founded an independent gathered congregation in Norwich in 1851. "
Separatists United Kingdom: England - - - - 1620 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 347-348. "Puritans. Some membes of the Church of England felt the English Reformation did not go far enough toward purging the ceremonies of the Roman Catholic Church... A small group of radical Puritans insisted on disassociating themselves from the Church of England altogether. Few in number, these Separatists were punished by the Crown and even criticized by some Puritan preachers. "
Separatists USA 102 - - - 1620 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 347-348. "Puritans. Some membes of the Church of England felt the English Reformation did not go far enough toward purging the ceremonies of the Roman Catholic Church... A small group of radical Puritans insisted on disassociating themselves from the Church of England altogether. Few in number, these Separatists were punished by the Crown and even criticized by some Puritan preachers. In 1620, a group of 102 Separatists known as the Pilgrim Fathers left for America to create a new England and settled in Plymouth, Massachusetts. "
Separatists USA - - 27
units
- 1776 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); [Orig. source: Paullin (1932)]; pg. 25. Table 2.1: "Numbers of Congregations per Denomination, 1776 "; Listed in table as "Separatist and Independent "
Separatists world - - 1
unit
1
country
1581 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 405. "The first really conspicuous advocate of Separatist views in England was Robert Browne (1550-1633), a student in Cambridge in the troublous time of Cartwright's brief professorship, and a graduate there in 1572. At first an advanced Presbyterian Puritan, he came to adopt Separatist principles by about 1850, and in connection with a friend, Robert Harrison, founded an independent gathered congregation in Norwich in 1851. "
Sephardic Judaism Israel - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 671. "Sephardim have persisted as a dwindling but prosperous and recognizable minority among Western Jews. Those of Arab lands, however, suffered from the cultural and economic decline of their locale and, after 1948, from growing Arab hostility to the State of Israel. Anticipating little future in the Muslim world, masses of these Jews emigrated to Israel. The preponderant majority were absorbed, though integration efforts have resulted in tensions difficult to alleviate because of Israel's beleagered status. Some measure of success has been lately attained, yet disparities between Western and Oriental Jews remain one of Israel's pressing problems. "
Sephardic Judaism Israel 2,017,692 49.20% - - 1983 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986); pg. 148-151. "Population: 4,101,000 "; "Although the Sephardim represent 60% of Israel's Jewish population... " [Other sources indicate Jewish population of Israel for this time at 82%. 60% of 82% = 49.2%]
Sephardic Judaism Israel 935,000 21.25% - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Israel ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 38-39. "Jews now make up about 85% of Israel's 4.4 million people... Nearly 50% of Israel's Jews were born in the country. Another 25% were born in Europe and are referred to as Ashkenazim, or European Jews. The rest--generally called Sephardic Jews--came from other Middle Eastern or North African countries. Most of the first immigrants to Israel came from Europe, bringing with them Western culture... After 1950, however, most of the Jewish immigrants came from the surrounding Arab-dominated world... Like Israel's Arab minority, the Sephardim are generally less educated and have a lower economic status than the Ashkenazim... Since the late 1970s, more Sephardim have held both local and national government positions, and their standard of living has begun to improve. "
Sephardic Judaism New York 23 - - - 1654 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 267. "The first wave of Jewish immigration to the New World had begun in 1654, when a party of 23 Sephardic Jews from Brazil arrived in the community tht was known as New Amsterdam under Dutch rule and later as New York. "
Sephardic Judaism USA 23 - - - 1654 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 267. "The first wave of Jewish immigration to the New World had begun in 1654, when a party of 23 Sephardic Jews from Brazil arrived in the community tht was known as New Amsterdam under Dutch rule and later as New York. "
Sephardic Judaism world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 671. "Sephardim... Jews of Spanish or North African ancestry, distinct from those of East or Central Europe, the Ashkenazim. In the Bible (Obad. 1:20) Sepharad refers to Asia Minor, but it was associated with Spain in the Middle Ages. The term has popularly come to include Jews of the Muslim world as well. Sephardi is primarily a cultural or linguistic designation, referring to distinctive religious practice and law... Sephardim have persisted as a dwindling but prosperous and recognizable minority among Western Jews. "
Sephardic Judaism world 2,900,000 - - - 1982 Charing, Douglas. The Jewish World. London, UK: Silver Burdett Co. (1983); pg. 14. "2 main groups in world Jewry: Ashkenasim, & Sephardim... Before 1933 [Ashkenasim] made up 90% of the world's Jews, but now the figure is nearer 80%... Sephardim... describes the Jews from Spain and Portugal who fled to north Africa, Greece and Italy. Jews from the Yemen, and from some other Asian countries, are often called orientals, but they are usually included with the Sephardic Jews, with whom they have much in common. "; Graphic: "...1982. There are about 14.5 million Jews in the world now, which represents less than 1/2% of the world's population. "
Sephardic Judaism world 4,200,000 - - - 1993 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 132. "The Sephardi-Ashkenzai division still exists to a lesser degree in Jewish life today, with Ashkenazim forming more than 70 percent of the Jews in the world...differences... have now faded, but many distinctive customs and traditions still persist. "
Sephardic Judaism world 3,000,000 - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Judaism; pg. 202, 265. "Sephardim: Jews of Spanish or Arabic descent, making up roughly 20% of modern Jewry. They often spoke Ladino, a Jewish form of Spanish that is to Sephardim what Yiddish is to Ashkenazim. "; pg. 202: "their [Jews in general] numbers are relatively small today--only about 15 million "
Sephardic Judaism world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 222-223. "Sephardim: The descendants of Spanish Jewry, as distinct from the Ashkenazim, who are descended from German Jewry. The names Sepharad and Ashkenaz are found in the Bible but were used in the Middle Ages to denote, respectively, Spain and Germany. Spain was the land in which Jewry reached its Golden Age, as this has been called; an age which saw the flowering of Jewish culture and produced such eminent figures as Maimonides, Nahmanides, Judah Halevi, Ibn Gabirol, Abravenl, and many others. After the expulsion from Spain in 1492, Spanish Jews resettled themselves in the land of Israel, the Ottoman Empire, and North Africa and later in America, in Amsterdam, and in other European cities. "
Sephardic Judaism world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 222-223. "Sephardim: ...Sephardim and Ashkenazim are not divided on doctrinal lines and should not be considered as two distinct Jewish sects. The differences, of which there are many, between the two groups are the result of different cultural conditions, local customs, and, especially, the different Halakhic authorities favored by each group. The rivalry between the two groups was often intense in former times, but is less so nowadays. Located, in the nineteenth century, outside Germany, the Sephardim were far less influenced by the Haskalah than the Ashkenazim, which partly accounts for the absence of any organized Reform movement among the Sephardim, except for the comparatively mild form that emerged in London. The popular language of Sephardi Jews is Ladino, as Yiddish is of the Ashkenazi Jews. Because of the differences in law, custom, and ritual between the two groups, Sephardi Rabbis lead Sephardi communities and Ashkeanzi Rabbis Ashkenazi communities. "
Serahuli Gambia - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Serahuli Gambia 140,000 10.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 44. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Serb Bosnia 1,395,000 31.00% - - 1991 Black, Eric. Bosnia: Fractured Region. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co. (1999); pg. 14. "In the country's last census--in 1991--44 percent of Bosnia's 4.5 million people identified themselves as Muslims, 31 percent as Serbs, and 17 percent as Croats... Bosnian Serbs are mostly followers of the Serbian Orthodox Church, Bosnian Croats are mostly Roman Catholics... "
Serb Kosovo - 10.00% - - 1999 Black, Eric. Bosnia: Fractured Region. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co. (1999); pg. 51. "Kosovo lies between the main part of Serbia and Albania. The region's population is 90% ethnic Albanian and 10% Serbian. "
Serbian & Macedonian Orthodox Macedonia 1,320,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; listed in table as "Serbian (Macedonian) Orthodox. " So I've included this statistic 2 times: As 'Serbian & Macedonian Orthodox', and 'Serbian Orthodox'
Serbian & Macedonian Orthodox Yugoslavia - former 11,750,000 50.00% - - 1990 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies Est. 23.5 million [total pop.] (1990). In 1990 Roman Catholic (30 percent), Serbian and Macedonian Orthodox (50 percent), Muslim (9 percent), Protestant (1 percent) and other (10 percent). Estimates of religious faiths vary widely.
Serbian Orthodox Australia 31,568 0.18% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census.
Serbian Orthodox Bosnia 1,395,000 31.00% - - 1991 Black, Eric. Bosnia: Fractured Region. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co. (1999); pg. 14. "In the country's last census--in 1991--44 percent of Bosnia's 4.5 million people identified themselves as Muslims, 31 percent as Serbs, and 17 percent as Croats... Bosnian Serbs are mostly followers of the Serbian Orthodox Church, Bosnian Croats are mostly Roman Catholics... "
Serbian Orthodox Bosnia and Herzegovina 1,090,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Serbian Orthodox Canada 18,494 - 17
units
- 1983 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 244-247, 165. Table 1: CCS. (# of adherents is from table's "inclusive membership " column, not "full communicant " col.)Listed as "Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada, Diocese of Canada. " Part of church of Constantinople.
Serbian Orthodox Croatia 530,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Serbian Orthodox Germany 200,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Serbisch-Orthodoxe Kirche " in table. Source: REMID. [Listed in 'Orthodox and Eastern Churches' section.]
Serbian Orthodox Macedonia 1,320,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table; listed in table as "Serbian (Macedonian) Orthodox. " So I've included this statistic 3 times: As Serbian (Macedonian) Orthodox, Macedonian Orthodox, and Serbian Orthodox
Serbian Orthodox New Zealand 90 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "VisionNet Census " (created by a Protestant group); web page: Orthodox Christian groups (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); original source: Statistics New Zealand Data taken from New Zealand national censuses, based on self-identification, down to denominational level. Total 1996 NZ population: 3,616,633.
Serbian Orthodox Serbia - - - - 2000 *LINK* Religion News Service. "World View: Withhold Communion " in Salt Lake Tribune, 18 Mar 2000. Concerned about a declining birthrate among Serbs, the highest body of the Serbian Orthodox Church in the former Yugoslavia has issued a letter asking priests to withhold Holy Communion from physicians, midwives and other medical professionals who perform abortions, which are legal in Serbia. "Abortion is a grievous sin before God, condemned by the Scriptures, " said the March 15 letter from the Holy Synod. "As such, it threatens the entire Serbian nation with biological extermination. "
Serbian Orthodox USA 200,000 - - - 1957 Spence, Hartzell. The Story of America's Religions; New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1960) [1st printing 1957]; pg. 117. "Orthodoxy in America today is divided into 23 dif. groups... The others range from 200,000 of serbian extraction, 130,000 Ukrainians, 100,000 Carpatho-Russians, 80,000 Syrians and 50,000 Rumanians, to a small group of Estonians and Latvians. "
Serbian Orthodox USA 200,000 - - - 1963 Rosten, Leo (ed.). Religions in America; New York: Simon & Schuster (1963), 8th ed. [1st pub. in 1952. 8th ed. completely revised]; pg. 94. "Other Orthodox bodies include the Serbian (200,000), Ukrainian (130,000), Carpatho-Russian (100,000), Syrian (80,000), Rumanian (50,000), and smaller branches of national extractions including the Bularian, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian and others. "
Serbian Orthodox world 7,500,000 - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973); pg. 14. "The Orthodox Church embraces the four ancient patriarchates of Constantinople (100,000), Alexandria (200,000), Antioch (300,000), and Jerusalem (35,000); the churches of... Serbia (7,500,000)... "
Serbian Orthodox world 7,400,000 - - - 1984 Walls, Andrew. "Christianity " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 99. "Figure 2.6: Eastern Christianity today: the Orthodox Church " [autocephalous churches in communion with Constantinople]
Serbian Orthodox world 6,500,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* Doogue, Edmund (Ecumenical News International). "German Churches Contribute Much More to WCC than Others " in Presbyterian News Service, 27 Sept. 1996 (viewed online 11 March 1999). "Those of the WCC's biggest member churches that in 1995 did not pay their membership contribution, or paid only a fraction of what they were supposed to, include... the Serbian Orthodox Church (6.5 million)... "
Serbian Orthodox world 7,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* OPPOSING VIEW (anti-) web page: "Orthodox " (viewed 26 Feb. 1999) "Autocephalus Churches: Russia (88 mill.), Romania (17 mill.), Greece (8 mill.), Servia (7 mill.), Bulgaria (6 Mill.), Georgia (1 mill.), Poland (0.6 mill.), Cyprus (0.5 mill.), Czechoislovakia (0.2 mill.), Albania, Sinai (0.1 mill.).... "
Serbian Orthodox Yugoslavia 6,810,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada Canada - - 14
units
- 1972 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 69. Listed in this book as "Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada "
Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada North America - - 86
units
- 1972 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 69. Listed in this book as "Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada "
Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada North America 67,000 - 68
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 187. "Serbian Eastern Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada... Today there are 68 parishes and 67,000 members. "
Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada North America 67,000 - 68
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). Listed as "Serbian Eastern Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada "
Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada USA - - 72
units
- 1972 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 69. Listed in this book as "Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada "
Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada USA 67,000 - 68
units
- 1986 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada. "
Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada USA 67,000 - 68
units
- 1986 *LINK* web site for Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches (accessed 1998); [Orig. source: Source: Kenneth B. Bedell, editor, Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches, annual.] Table: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches: U.S. Religious Bodies with more than 60,000 Members "; "...prepared for the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census... for the 1997 edition of the Statistical Abstract of the U.S. "
Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada USA 67,000 - 68
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.
Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada USA - - 130
units
- 1999 *LINK* Chambers, Steve. "Religious Leaders' Calls For Peace Go Unheeded " in Salt Lake Tribune (Saturday, 3 April 1999; viewed online 3 April 1999). "As head of the tiny Serbian Orthodox Church in the United States, Metropolitan Christopher had something to say about the NATO bombing in his native land. Problem was, he couldn't get anyone at the White House to return his telephone calls. 'It's very difficult,' Christopher said in a telephone interview from Illinois, where he oversees a flock of 130 churches across the country. "
Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada world 97,123 - 78
units
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 134. "Serbian Orthodox Church in the U.S.A. and Canada... Libertyville, IL [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1984 the Church reported 97,123 members, 78 parishes and missions and 73 priests. "
Serbian Orthodox Diocese for the United States and Canada Canada - - 10
units
- 1974 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 69. -
Serbian Orthodox Diocese for the United States and Canada USA - - 45
units
- 1974 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 69. -
Serbian Orthodox Diocese for the United States and Canada world - - 55
units
2
countries
1974 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 69. -
Serere Senegal - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; Listed in table as "Serer "
Serere Senegal 1,386,000 16.50% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 59. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.; "Listed in table as "Serere "
Serrano North America - Pacific Coast 1,500 - - - 1400 C.E. Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Serrano (aboriginal): 1,500 "; [Exact year not given.]
Serrano world 1,500 - - - 1400 C.E. Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Serrano (aboriginal): 1,500 "; [Exact year not given.]
Servant Catholic Church world 118 - 3
units
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 90. "Servant Catholic Church... Central Islip, NY [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1984 the church reported three congregations, five priests, and 118 members. "
Servants of the Light United Kingdom: Britain 708 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Listed in table as "Servants of the Light (SOL) "
Set Free Christian Fellowship California 6,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table, grouped by state, columns for city, state, "size " (avg. weekly attendance), etc. From study finding all U.S. megachurches (congreg. w/ "consistent weekly attendance of at least 2,000 persons "); an independent in Anaheim, Calif., pastor Phil Aguilar.
Seth Network International world 7,000,000 - - 30
countries
1998 *LINK* web site: "Seth Network International "; web page: "SNI Introduction " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999) New Age:Seth Network International:
"A recent perusal of our data base shows that we have members and subscribers in 30 countries. " "We hear there are over seven million Seth readers in the world... "
Seventh Day Baptist General Conference Alabama 66 0.00% 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 53. [Listed as 'Seventh Day Baptist General Conference.']
Seventh Day Baptist General Conference Arkansas 234 0.01% 4
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 183. [Listed as 'Seventh Day Baptist General Conference.']
Seventh Day Baptist General Conference California 251 0.00% 6
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 198. [Listed as 'Seventh Day Baptist General Conference.']
Seventh Day Baptist General Conference Colorado 430 0.01% 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 342. [Listed as 'Seventh Day Baptist General Conference.']


Seventh Day Baptist General Conference, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus

Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.