Adherents.com Home Page

Adherents.com


43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Seicho-No-Ie, Manitoba

Seicho-No-Ie, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Seicho-No-Ie New York - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998) worldwide directory of "Truth of Life Centers ": [directory link] "Seicho-No-Ie New York, 247 East 53rd Street, New York, NY 10022 "
Seicho-No-Ie New York: New York City - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998) worldwide directory of "Truth of Life Centers ": [directory link] "Seicho-No-Ie New York, 247 East 53rd Street, New York, NY 10022 "
Seicho-No-Ie North America - - 14
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998) worldwide directory of "Truth of Life Centers ": Portland, Seattle, San Jose, San Francisco, Southern California, Ft. Lauderdale, New York City, Chicago (2), Honolulu, Toronto, North York, Winnipeg, Vancouver
Seicho-No-Ie North America - - 11
units
- 1998 *LINK* web site: "Seicho-No-Ie Truth of Life Movement "; web page: "Truth of Life Centers " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999); "Last modified: November 02, 1998 " I counted 11 "Truth of Life " centers on the North America map.
Seicho-No-Ie Ontario - - 2
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998) worldwide directory of "Truth of Life Centers ": [directory link] Seicho-No-Ie Toronto, 662 Victoria Park Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4C-5H4 Canada; Seicho-No-Ie Humanity Enlightenment Movement North York Center 218 Sheppard Ave. East, Suite 102, North York, Ontario M2N 3A9 "
Seicho-No-Ie Ontario - - 2
units
- 1998 *LINK* web page: "Location of SNI Center " [in Canada] (1998), presented by SNI Western Canada District Union directory: SNI Toronto Center, 662 Victoria Park Av., Toronto, Ontario; SNI North York Center, 218 Sheppard Avenue East, Suit 102, North York, Ontario
Seicho-No-Ie Oregon - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998) worldwide directory of "Truth of Life Centers ": [directory link] "Truth of Life Center Portland, 1314 S.W. 57th Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97221 "
Seicho-No-Ie USA - - 10
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998) worldwide directory of "Truth of Life Centers ": Portland, Seattle, San Jose, San Francisco, Southern California, Ft. Lauderdale, New York City, Chicago (2), Honolulu
Seicho-No-Ie Washington - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998) worldwide directory of "Truth of Life Centers ": [directory link] "Truth of Life Center Seattle, 24321 S.E. 43rd Place, Issaquah, Washington 98029 "
Seicho-No-Ie world 1,000,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1496. "Seicho no Ie... It claims over a million adherents and has a strong appeal to the more prosperous and to some intellectuals. "
Seicho-No-Ie world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 669. "Organization. In an impressive headquarters building in Tokyo the world organization of Seicho no Ie is centered. From there the lines of authority flow downward to regional, prefectural and local agencies and outward directly to overseas installations. "
Sekai Kyuseikyo Japan - - - - 1935 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 670. "Sekai Kyusei-kyo; Sekai Meshia-kyo. A religious movement founded by Okada Mokichi (1882-1955), who was known as the Meishu-sama ('spiritual leader'). It heralded the creation of an ideal world--a paradise on earth characterized by peace, health, prosperity, and beauty--through the purifying power of a divine light... Okada... left Omoto in 1934 and in the following year formed his own organization, Dai Nihon Kannon Kai (lit. 'Great Japan Kannon Association')... forced to curtail his activities for the duration of World War II. In the new freedom of postwar Japan, Okada resumed his work with great success. In 1950 he adopted a new name for his flourishing movment, Sekai Kyusei-kyo or Sekai Meshiya-kyo... "
Sekai Kyuseikyo Japan 803,841 0.70% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as "other " new religion (neither Shinto nor Buddhist); origin year: 1934.
Sekai Kyuseikyo Japan - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 670. "Sekai Kyusei-kyo... As a symbol and foretaste of the new age, the World Messianity Church has built two mini-paradises in Hakone and Atami, both beautiful resort areas. The tombs of the founder and his wife and an excellent art museum are located at Hakone. Administrative offices, as well as a great sanctuary and a second art museum, are at Atami. A training center and school have been established at Kyoto. "
Sekai Kyuseikyo Japan - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "Sekai Kyusei Kyo, The Church of World Messianity, was founded by Mokichi Okada (1882-1955), a former staff member of Omoto Kyo who in 1926 received revelations and was empowered to be a channel of God's Healing Light (jorei) to remove illness, poverty, and strife from the world and inaugurate a new messianic age. Okada's teaching is represented by the scripture Johrei, which has been edited and translated by the Society of Johrei, an offshoot of Okada's movement. "
Sekai Kyuseikyo Japan - - - - 1996 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 157. "Sekai Kyusei-kyo: Religion for the Salvation of the World. A religious movement originally founded by a former Omoto member Okada, Mokishi (1882-1955) following a revalation from Kannon. In 1928 he set up the Great Japan Association for the Worship of the Bodhisattva Kannon (Dainihon Kannon-kai)... In 1950 following a schism Okada formed Sekai Meshiya kyo 'Religion of World Messiah-ship', a name later changed to Sekai Kyusei-kyo... The organisation is usually known in the West under the initials MOA (Mokishi Okada Association). "
Sekai Kyuseikyo world - - - - 1935 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 670. "Sekai Kyusei-kyo... The official English name is 'The Church of World Messianity.' A nationwide movement in Japan, it has spread to Japanese communities, notably in Hawaii, California, and Brazil, where it has also attracted a significant number of non-Japanese devotees. "
Sekai Kyuseikyo world 1,000,000 - - - 1993 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 208. "Sekai Kyuseikyo has about one million members, a growing number of them in the west and the third world, especially Brazil and Thailand. "
Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyodan California: Orange County 200 - - - 1999 *LINK* McGraw, Carol. "Spreading the light " in The Orange County Register, Aug. 1, 1999 (viewed online 4 Aug. 1999). "The faithful, members of Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyoda... Japanese devotees, some of them students from nearby University of California, Irvine, predominate. But there are Anglos, Hispanics and others in the crowd. There are 200 members locally, and 50,000 worldwide. "
Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyodan Japan - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "The founder of Mahikari, Yoshikazu Okada (1901-1974), was a member of Sekai Kyusei Kyo before receiving his own revelations in 1959... The two sects Mahikari [i.e. Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyodan] and Sukyo Mahikari both practice a nearly identical form of healing called okiyome... "
Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyodan USA 500 - - - 1999 *LINK* Ross, Rick. OPPOSING VIEW web page: "Mahikari/Sukyo Mahikari " (viewed 4 July 1999). Garry Greenwood, former member: "Sukyo Mahikari has around 1,000 plus active core memebrs in the United States with probably a few hundred in Canada. The other second largest faction of Mahikari (Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyodan) also probably has over 500 active members there ".
Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyodan world 50,000 - - - 1993 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 208-209. "Its membership [Mahikari, or Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyodan, or 'World True Light Civilization'] is around 50,000, which is small compared to the size of most other Japanese new religious movements. "
Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyodan world 50,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* McGraw, Carol. "Spreading the light " in The Orange County Register, Aug. 1, 1999 (viewed online 4 Aug. 1999). "The faithful, members of Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyoda... There are... 50,000 worldwide. "
Seke Gabon - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
self religions California: San Francisco - 16.67% - - 1973 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988). [Orig. source: "These and other figures from the San Francisco area are from a representative sample survey of 1,000 residents of the greater San Francisco metropolitan area conducted by the author in 1973. For greater detail, see my Consciousness Reformation. "]; pg. 51. "Besides the more esoteric movements, a number of new organizations emerged with syncretic doctrines that were informed as much by popular psychology, science, and mysticism as by conventional religious traditions... Inner Peace Movement... Erhard Seminars Training... Arica, Bioenergetics, Psychosynthesis, Rolfing, and Silva Mind Control... In the San Francisco area, one person in six claimed to have taken part in one or another of these kinds of groups by the early 1970s. "; pg. 337: "The question asked specifically about participation in 'an encounter group or similar kind of training such as sensory awareness, sensitivity training, a T-group, or growth group. "
Self-Realization Fellowship USA - - - - 1952 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 319-320. "...American religious movements even thought their teachings... are traditionally Hindu. The following are some better-known examples... Paramahansa Yogananda (Self-Realization Fellowship). The first Hindu missionary to settle in America was Yogananda (Mukunda Lal Ghosh, 1893-1952), a Bengali who, like Swami Vivekananda, came to America to attend a conference--the International Congress of Religious Liberals in Boston, in 1920--and stayed to establish his own organization. Unlike Vivekananda, however, Yogananda remained in the West, establishing a center at Los Angeles and achieving wide recognition through his published memoirs, Autobiography of a Yogi. "
Self-Realization Fellowship USA - - 8
units
- 1994 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 195. "Today the Self-Realization Fellowship maintains eight temples throughout the western United States and has its international headquarters in Los Angeles. "
Self-Realization Fellowship world 200,000 - - - 1965 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 1048. "...Self-Realization Fellowship organized in 1914 by another Indian swami, Paramhansa Yogananda... By the 1960s the fellowship claimed two hundred thousand members. "
Self-Realization Fellowship world - - 500
units
- 1996 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (1998) [Orig. source: Melton, J Gordon. 1996 Encyclopedia of American Religions. Detroit, Michigan: Gale Research Co. Fifth Edition. (p 871)] Yoga:
Nearly 500 meditation centers worldwide. "Their traditions began in India in 1917 as the Yogoda Satsanga Society and spread throughout that country. "
Self-Transformation United Kingdom: Britain 7,000 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "
Semi-Pelagianism world - - - - 495 C.E. *LINK* Web site: "TrueBranch Ministry "; web page: "The Unholy Alliance " (viewed 3 July 1999). By Dan S., a 'new-creation Christian'; Written in 1985. Revised 1995, 1997. "Semi-Pelagianism: By the end of the Fifth century, through a process of compromise and conciliation with the teachings of the Bible, Pelagianism spawned Semi-Pelagianism... Semi-Pelagianism was ineffectively condemned by Rome's leaders at The Council of Orange (529 AD). However, it gained sufficient popularity to be confirmed at the Council of Trent (1547 AD) and adopted as an official religious doctrine of the Roman Catholic Church... Recent books by Pope John Paul II affirm the Semi-Pelagian position of modern-day Catholicism. "
Semiahmoo North America - Pacific Coast 300 - - - 1843 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Semiahmoo world 300 - - - 1843 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Seminole Florida 6,000 - - - 1830 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 401. "In 1830, under President Jackson, Congress passed the Indian Removal Act. This Act specified that all Indian tribes east of the Mississippi would be removed to the indian Territory west of the Mississippi... This forced migration is the famous Trail of Tears... From a pre-First Seminole War population of 6,000, only 300-400 remained in southern Florida. "
Seminole Florida 400 - - - 1842 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 401. "In 1830, under President Jackson, Congress passed the Indian Removal Act. This Act specified that all Indian tribes east of the Mississippi would be removed to the indian Territory west of the Mississippi... This forced migration is the famous Trail of Tears... From a pre-First Seminole War population of 6,000, only 300-400 remained in southern Florida. "
Seminole Florida 2,000 - - - 1970 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 13. "In 1970, there were about 4,000 Seminole in Oklahoma and 2,000 in Florida. "
Seminole North America - Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps 2,000 - - - 1800 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Seminole Oklahoma 4,000 - - - 1970 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 13. "In 1970, there were about 4,000 Seminole in Oklahoma and 2,000 in Florida. "
Seminole USA 13,797 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Seminole USA 13,797 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Seminole USA 2,500 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 401, 403. "Seminoles and Miccosukees: Location: United States (Florida); Population 2,500 Seminoles; 500 Miccosukees; Religion: Traditional religion; Christianity "; Pg. 403: "Since the Seminoles began converting in the latter 1930s, Christian Seminole churches have scheduled revivals at the time of the Corn Dance. Attendance at the native gathering was chastised. In turn, the traditional people did not want Christians to attend. These chasms have aided in curtailing many traditional ways. "
Seminole world 2,000 - - - 1800 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Seneca North America 9,133 - - - 1991 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 252. "The total population of Iroquois today is over 60,000 (according to the US Census of 1990 and Canadian Census of 1991). " Table showing tribes of the Iroquois nation (Mohawk, Oneida, Seneca, Tuscarora, Onondaga, Cayaga), and population of the tribe. [NOTE: This is a measure of tribal affiiation. Most Iroquois today are Christian.]
Seneca-Cayuga USA 1,225 - - - 1990 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 252. "The total population of Iroquois today is over 60,000 (according to the US Census of 1990 and Canadian Census of 1991). "; "There were also 1,225 US Census respondents who listed themselves as Seneca-Cayuga... "
Sentinelese India: Andaman 117 - - - 1901 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "; estimate
Sentinelese India: Andaman 117 - - - 1901 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 87. "In 1901, when the British undertook the first census in the Indian subcontinent, officials counted 624 Great Andamanese and estimated numbers for the other three tribes: 672 Onge, 468 Jarawa and 117 Sentinelese. "
Sentinelese India: Andaman 50 - - - 1951 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "; estimate
Sentinelese India: Andaman 50 - - - 1951 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 87. "By 1951, when independent India conducted its first census, the number of Great Andamanese had fallen to a mere 23. Estimates of the other tribes were also low--150 Onge, Jarawa and 50 Sentinelese. "
Sentinelese India: Andaman 100 - - - 1998 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "; estimate
Sentinelese India: Andaman 100 - - - 1998 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 87. "Only an estimated 100 Onge, 250 Jarawa and 100 Sentinelese are now alive. "
Senufo Cote d'Ivoire - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Senufo Mali - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Senufo Niger - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Senufo world - - - 3
countries
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; "Ivory Coast, Mali, Niger "
Separate Baptists USA - - - - 1770 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 96. "Discussing the influence of those who went out from old Sandy Creek, the contemporary historian, Morgan Edwards, with some pardonable exaggeration declared: 'All the Separate Baptists sprang hence: not only eastward towards the sea, but westward towards the great river Mississippi, but northward to Virginia and southward to South Carolina and Georgia...' "
Separate Baptists USA - - - - 1770 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 96. "The Sandy Creek churches were known as Separate Baptists, and in 1770 they had grown strong enough to divide into three associations, one each in Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. "
Separate Baptists USA - - - - 1860 Leonard, Bill J. God's Last and Only Hope: The Fragmentation of the Southern Baptist Convention. Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdman's Publishing Co. (1990); pg. 33. Centered on the "Sandy Creek Baptist Church, Sandy Creek, North Carolina... Separate Baptists were an unruly lot who carried their revivalistic fervor west into Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas. "; [one of 4 traditions (pg. 32) "that existed among Baptists in the South and that became part of the denominational makeup after 1845 "]
Separate Baptists world 5,000 - 69
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 704. "Separate Baptists: A group of Baptist churches which 'separated' from the regular group in the 'New Light' controversy in connection with the work of Whitefield... There are 69 churches and about 5,000 members. "
Separate Baptists in Christ USA 10,000 - 101
units
- 1988 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Separate Baptists in Christ. "
Separate Baptists in Christ USA 8,000 - 100
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.
Separate Baptists in Christ USA 8,000 - 100
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Separate Baptists in Christ
Separate Baptists in Christ world 9,051 - 105
units
- 1983 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 53. "In 1983 there were 101 churches and four mission churches, with 9,051 members, 161 ordained ministers, and 14 licentiate ministers. "
Separate Baptists in Christ world 10,000 - 105
units
- 1988 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). Also known as "General Association of Separate Baptists "
Separate Baptists in Christ world - - 100
units
- 1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 127. "Today this group consists of approximately 100 churches. "
Separatists Europe - - - 2
countries
1587 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 407. "Separatism had waned after Browne's return to the Church of England, but soon reappeared. In 1587 Henrey Barrow (1550?-1593),a lawyer of London, and John Greenwood (?-1593), a clergyman, were arrested for holding Separatist meetings in London. From their prison they smuggled manuscrpits which appeared as printed treatises in Holland, attacking Anglicans and Puritans alike, and advocating strict Separatist principles more radical than those of Browne. A number were won, including Francis Johnson... "


Separatists, continued

Search Adherents.com

Custom Search
comments powered by Disqus

Collection and organization of data © 23 April 2007 by Adherents.com.   Site created by custom apps written in C++.  
Research supported by East Haven University.
Books * Videos * Music * Posters

We are always striving to increase the accuracy and usefulness of our website. We are happy to hear from you. Please submit questions, suggestions, comments, corrections, etc. to: webmaster@adherents.com.