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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

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Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Scanians Europe 1,500,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "Scania - the common name for the provinces of Skane, Halland and Blekinge has 1.5 million inhabitants. Historically the Island of Bornholm was also included in the Scanian territory. The member organisation is very EU positive and has fully adopted the EU subsidiarity principle, which means that every political decision shall be taken at the lowest possible level. "
Scanians Sweden 1,500,000 15.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Scania " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "Scania (Skaneland) is situated on the southern part of the Scandinavian peninsula. Area: 20 000 km2. The historic Scania consists of four provinces: Skane, Halland, Blekinge and the island of Bornholm. Today Skane, Halland and Blekinge are part of Sweden and the island of Bornholm is a part of Denmark. The main regional city is Malmo. Population: The population of Scania is about 1.5 million, or about 15% of the total population of Sweden. Scanians as a people or nation do not have any legal status in Sweden. "
Scholasticism world - - - - 1100 C.E. Osborne, Richard. Philosophy for Beginners. New York, NY: Writers and Readers Publishing (1992); pg. 48. "Scholasticism began to emerge in the 11th Century with the beginnings of a new sense of order after the preceding 400 years of chaos. There was growth and reform in the monasteries, and in increase in the general level of education, even among the laity. New Orders of monks appeared, opposed to the wealth and worldliness of established monasticism. The Carthusians, the Camaldolese &... Cisercians appeared like reforming political parties within the... Church... The first of the early schoolmen was Roscelin (b. 1050), who was, by all accounts, [not] a good philosopher. He said that universals were just 'breath of the voice' or words--mere physical acts. He also mocked his poor pupil, Abelard (1079-1142), a much better philosopher [whose]... best-known work is Sic et Non or 'Yes and No' in which he argued that apart from the Scriptures, the dialectic was the road to the truth and generally good for the mind. He also put forward a complex argument against universals. "
Scholasticism world - - - - 1308 C.E. Osborne, Richard. Philosophy for Beginners. New York, NY: Writers and Readers Publishing (1992); pg. 53. "What is scholasticism? Here's a rough definition. (Remember, it's all essentially about God, but very complex in details): 1) An acceptance of the prevailing catholic orthodoxy; 2) Within this orthodoxy, an acceptance of Aristotole as a greater thinker than Plato; 3) A recognition that Aristotle and Plato disagreed about the notion of universals--and that this was a vital question to resolve; 4) Giving prominence to 'dialectical' thinking and syllogistic reasoning; 5) An acceptance of the distinction between 'natural' and 'revealed' theology. (Rather like the older distinction beween reason and revelation.); 6) A tendency to dispute everything at length. (Some people called it wordplay.)
Scholasticism world - - - - 1349 C.E. Osborne, Richard. Philosophy for Beginners. New York, NY: Writers and Readers Publishing (1992); pg. 52. "There were three other important philosophers who we call schoolmen but who didn't necessarily agree with Aquinas [1225-1274], or with each other. They were Roger Bacon [1214-1294], Duns Scotus [1270-1308] and William of Occam [1290-1349]. "; Pg. 54: "William of Occam was by common consent the greatest of scholastic logicians and originally the pupil of Duns Scotus... "
School of Economic Science United Kingdom: Britain 5,000 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; Listed in table as "School of Economic Science (SES) "
Schwenkfelder Church Pennsylvania 306 - 6
units
- 1895 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 244. "In 1895 [the Schwenckfelders] reported a total of six church edifices, all in Pennsylvania, with 306 communicants; in 1950, five churches with 2,400 members. "
Schwenkfelder Church Pennsylvania - - 5
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Other European Free Traditions; pg. 328. "Schwenkfelder Church in America. Pennsburg, PA [H.Q.]... the present general conference... of five churches, all in southeastern Pennsylvania... Membership: In 1988 there were 5 churches, 2,700 members and 13 ministers. "
Schwenkfelder Church Pennsylvania 3,031 0.03% 5
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 2,488. [Listed as 'Schwenkfelder Church.']
Schwenkfelder Church USA 306 - 6
units
- 1895 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 244. "In 1895 [the Schwenckfelders] reported a total of six church edifices, all in Pennsylvania, with 306 communicants; in 1950, five churches with 2,400 members. "
Schwenkfelder Church USA 2,400 - 5
units
- 1950 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 244. "In 1895 [the Schwenckfelders] reported a total of six church edifices, all in Pennsylvania, with 306 communicants; in 1950, five churches with 2,400 members. "
Schwenkfelder Church USA - - 5
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 328. "the present general conference... of five churches, all in southeastern Pennsylvania... "
Schwenkfelder Church USA 3,031 - 5
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 2,488. [Listed as 'Schwenkfelder Church.']
Schwenkfelder Church USA 2,700 - 5
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 224. "The body has disappeared from Europe, but persists in the U.S., with 2,700 members in five local congregations, located within a 50-mile radius of Philadelphia. "
Schwenkfelder Church USA 2,489 - 5
units
- 1991 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Schwenkfelder Church. "
Schwenkfelder Church USA 2,489 - 5
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). -
Schwenkfelder Church USA 3,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998); "last updated October 1998 " Table: "Christian Organizations "; "Membership numbers, as supplied by various denominations "
Schwenkfelder Church world 2,700 - 5
units
1
country
1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 224. "The body has disappeared from Europe, but persists in the U.S., with 2,700 members in five local congregations, located within a 50-mile radius of Philadelphia. "
Schwenkfelder Church world 2,489 - 5
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). -
science fiction - Star Trek USA 300,000 - - - 1995 Poe, Stephen Edward. A Vision of the Future: Star Trek Voyager. Pocket Books: New York (1998). [Taken from 1995 Paramount press release]; pg. 58. "Star Trek conventions are held every weekend of every year, in at least four different U.S. cities attracting more than 300,000 fans and an estimated one million fans worldwide. "
science fiction - Star Trek world 1,000,000 - - - 1995 Poe, Stephen Edward. A Vision of the Future: Star Trek Voyager. Pocket Books: New York (1998). [Taken from 1995 Paramount press release]; pg. 58. "Star Trek conventions are held every weekend of every year, in at least four different U.S. cities attracting more than 300,000 fans and an estimated one million fans worldwide. "
science fiction - Star Trek world - - - 100
countries
1995 Poe, Stephen Edward. A Vision of the Future: Star Trek Voyager. Pocket Books: New York (1998). [Taken from 1995 Paramount press release]; pg. 58. "Star Trek is seen in more than 100 countries & has been translated into dozens of languages. Every month, a classic ST or ST:TNG novel is published... 13 ST books are sold ever minute in the U.S. More than 63 million ST books are in print & have been translated into more than 15 languages... "
science fiction - Star Trek world - - - - 1997 Albanese, Catherine L. America Religion and Religions. Santa Barbara, California: University of California (1997); pg. 470. "...it is hard to avoid noticing, in the terms of contemporary religious studies scholarship, that Star Trek, in its many manifestations, has functioned at the center of a quasi-religious movement. "
science fiction - Star Trek world - - - - 1998 *LINK* Boland, Steve. "Star Dreck " on web site: "SF Weekly.com " (viewed 6 March 1999); "(C) 1998 NewTimes, Inc. "; Book review of: Future Perfect: How Star Trek Conquered Planet Earth by Jeff Greenwald. "...five years ago, you could've written a book describing Star Trek as a defining, up-and coming movement, and it would've been merely silly. But in 1998, such a book is not only silly -- it's flat out wrong, and desperately, pathetically, hopelessly out of touch. "
science fiction - Star Trek world - - - - 1998 *LINK* Boland, Steve. "Star Dreck " on web site: "SF Weekly.com " (viewed 6 March 1999); "(C) 1998 NewTimes, Inc. "; Book review of: Future Perfect: How Star Trek Conquered Planet Earth by Jeff Greenwald. "Star Trek is not, as Greenwald posits, 'mythical' -- it's a TV show, albeit a better one than Baywatch. Trekkers aren't the vanguard of an emerging humanist/techno Utopia -- they're just part of a pop-culture cult. And that cult is way past its prime. "
science fiction - Star Trek world - - - 108
countries
1998 *LINK* Boland, Steve. "Star Dreck " on web site: "SF Weekly.com " (viewed 6 March 1999); "(C) 1998 NewTimes, Inc. "; Book review of: Future Perfect: How Star Trek Conquered Planet Earth by Jeff Greenwald. "Greenwald likes to toss off numbers to illustrate Star Trek's global appeal: its 32-year run, the 108 countries the TV series are syndicated in, the billion dollars its eight movies have grossed. But he mostly ignores the dismal ratings of Star Trek's current television incarnations, Deep Space Nine and Voyager -- both have been stuck at around a 4 share, about equal to syndicated reruns of Walker, Texas Ranger. And he also makes the critical mistake of confusing ubiquity with importance. "
science fiction - Star Trek world - - - - 1998 Lelis, Lorraine. "Normality... The Final Frontier " in Psychology Today (January/February 1998); pg. 9. "Sandy Wolfson, Ph.D., of the U. of Northumbria in England, has administered her Star Trek Addiction Revealer... to several hundred Trekkies. Most score in the 'moderately addicted' range, but 5 to 10% of the respondents fit the psychological criteria for extreme addiction... "
science fiction - Star Trek world 100,000 - - - 1999 Email response from Jeff Greenwald, journalist with Wired magazine and author of Future Perfect: How Star Trek Conquered Planet Earth, which chronicles two years of essentially ethnographic research with Star Trek fans all over the world. "On reflection, I can't say I'd be comfortable trying to guess at what percentage of Trek fans see the show as something more than good television; even less so given the fact that I probably am an 'authority' on this extremely esoteric subject. I would say, however, that the fact of the show, and its basic premise, is quite possibly familiar to perhaps a billion people. If one hundreth of one percent (1/10,000) of those people have come to rely on Star Trek as their moral gnomon, we're looking at a hundred thousand 'adherents.' Of course, both those numbers may be wildly generous. And given the state of the world, it seems they must be... "
science fiction - Star Wars Switzerland 35 - - - 1999 Hamilton, Kendall & Devin Gordon. "Waiting for Star Wars " in Newsweek (Feb. 1, 1999); pg. 63. "'We've got people coming [to the U.S. for the premier of Star Wars episode 1] from Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Japan, everywhere,' Stevens says. 'The Switzerland fan club called and said their entire base of 35 members is coming.' "
science fiction - Star Wars world - - - - 1999 Hamilton, Kendall & Devin Gordon. "Waiting for Star Wars " in Newsweek (Feb. 1, 1999); pg. 62. "Fandom also brings companionship. 'Star Wars is more than a movie. It's a whole culture,' says Lincoln Gasking, 21, who often stays up until sunrise tweaking his... Star Wars Web site from... Melbourne, Australia. Like all cultures, Lucas's fans have their own icons, ethics and language... "
science fiction - Star Wars world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Johnston, Jerry. "Of Ewoks, Elvis and spirituality " in Deseret News [interview with Orson Scott Card]. Saturday, 15 May 1999 (viewed online 15 May 1999). "I asked [Orson Scott Card]: 'In the world of religion, if we put the Roman Catholic Church on one end of the spectrum and the 'Graceland cult' spawned by Elvis on the other, where would you put this new religious sect called Star Wars?' Card may be America's premier science fiction writer. His writing almost always has spiritual overtones. His answer is worth noting. 'First,' he said, 'Star Wars is a religion ?though it's an easy religion. It gives people the feeling there is mystic importance. People are hungry for their acts to mean something more than just getting by. 'It doesn't matter if the origins are claptrap ?as with the Graceland myth. Even when the origin is nonsense, if there are sacrifices made out of faith and love ?even ludicrous sacrifices ?I believe a kind of sacredness begins to emerge from the faith of the people.' "
science fiction - Star Wars world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Johnston, Jerry. "Of Ewoks, Elvis and spirituality " in Deseret News [interview with Orson Scott Card]. Saturday, 15 May 1999 (viewed online 15 May 1999). "Whether or not you take the faith and love of Star Warriors and Gracelanders seriously, they themselves do. All those kids waiting in line for weeks to get tickets formed a religious vigil of sorts. And in the past 10 years more people have had visions of Elvis than St. Francis. In America, many churches stand empty while the parishioners attend 'The Phantom Menace' or visit Memphis. "
science fiction - Star Wars world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Johnston, Jerry. "Of Ewoks, Elvis and spirituality " in Deseret News. Saturday, 15 May 1999 (viewed online 15 May 1999). "Those who say 'Star Wars' is only a movie and Graceland is only a place may not be that far removed from those who say the Bible is only a book and Mecca a dot on the map. "
science fiction - Star Wars world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Stack, Peggy Fletcher. "'Star Wars' Movies Incorporate Spiritual Themes " in Salt Lake Tribune. 15 May 1999 (viewed online 15 May 1999). "As a young boy, the filmmaker said he asked his mother, 'If there's only one God, why are there so many religions?' He has finally concluded, he said in a Time interview, that 'all the religions are true.' Lucas said he believes in God -- though who or what God is, he's not sure -- and that there's a place for organized religion. 'I would hate to find ourselves in a completely secular world where entertainment was passing for some kind of religious experience.' "
science fiction - Star Wars world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Stack, Peggy Fletcher. "'Star Wars' Movies Incorporate Spiritual Themes " in Salt Lake Tribune. 15 May 1999 (viewed online 15 May 1999). "Beyond that, the music and special effects evoke a religiousness, particularly at the end of the first movie, when Luke and Han are 'knighted' for their heroism. Many Christian services 'create a spiritual setting with incense, candles and music,' she said. 'This is a techno version of religious pageantry.' The movies appeal to grown men as well as their sons, she said, because 'it lets them get in touch with their childhood spirituality.' "
science fiction - Star Wars world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Stack, Peggy Fletcher. "'Star Wars' Movies Incorporate Spiritual Themes " in Salt Lake Tribune. 15 May 1999 (viewed online 15 May 1999). "It could have been just another sci-fi adventure flick, with dazzling special effects and cool battle scenes. But 'Star Wars' creator George Lucas had loftier ambitions. So Lucas scoured the works of mythologist Joseph Campbell and psychologist Carl Jung and then infused his trilogy with spiritual themes drawn from age-old religious traditions. 'Star Wars' features a titanic battle between good and evil, a spiritual power that can bend light, the temptations of pride, a fallen hero, redemption and resurrection. Lucas said he did not set out to replace religion, just to raise questions. 'Star Wars' is designed 'to make people think about larger entities and mysteries of life,' Lucas told a throng of film critics in New York last week. 'There definitely aren't enough answers in 'Star Wars' to constitute a religion,' he said. 'The point is for [viewers] to go and look through the religions and find something that has some answers for them.' "
science fiction - Star Wars world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Stack, Peggy Fletcher. "'Star Wars' Movies Incorporate Spiritual Themes " in Salt Lake Tribune. 15 May 1999 (viewed online 15 May 1999). "Jodi Dean, a professor of political and cultural theory at Hobart and William Smith College in Geneva, N.Y., is planning to teach a class called 'Jedi Studies' next year. 'The only text we can guarantee that students will know is Star Wars,' Dean said Thursday. The movies have a special appeal to young men, she said. 'It's a spiritual thing for a lot of guys who might not get it from sports,' she said. 'It presents a more spiritual kind of warfare.' Epic Struggle: The space trilogy is 'like a biblical world, where miracles happen and the actions of individuals are signs of the larger struggle between good and evil,' Dean said. In Luke Skywalker, the films have a reluctant hero who, much like the biblical Moses, does not want to lead the people but is forced to, she said. "
science fiction - Star Wars world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Stack, Peggy Fletcher. "'Star Wars' Movies Incorporate Spiritual Themes " in Salt Lake Tribune. 15 May 1999 (viewed online 15 May 1999). "Still, Dean agrees that 'Star Wars' is not a substitute for organized religion, but picks up themes many find missing from their lives. Lucas said many religious people were using "Star Wars " to 'demonstrate their beliefs -- not only Judeo-Christian, but also Eastern faiths.' "
science fiction - X-Files USA 8,000,000 - - - 1996 Neimark, Jill. "Do the Spirits Move You? " in Psychology Today (September/October 1996); pg. 50. "Television's cult hit, 'The X-Files,' reels in 8 million households per show. "
Scientists USA - - - - 1988 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 301-302. "Evidence suggests that rationality, natural science, and the social sciences have all exercised a negative effect on traditional religious beliefs and practices. Not only do scientists--and especially social scientists--demonstrate radically low levels of religious commitment, but scientific and social scientific meaning systems also appear to operate as functional alternatives to traditional theistic ideas for a number of people, and technical rationality plays an increasingly important legitimating function in the wider society. "
Scientists world - - - - 1750 Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe. "Religion " in The Future Now: Predicting the 21st Century. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (1998); pg. 37. "The eighteenth century... Humanists made a god of man. Communists replaced God with equally potent, equally transcendent History. Scientists substituted godlike evolution for discarded providence.
Scientists world 3,000,000 - - - 1975 Wallechinsky, David & Irving Wallace; The People's Almanac; Garden City, NY: Doubleday (1975); pg. 1270. List of "Major World Religions ": "Scientists... believe that theirs is the only true path... It is estimated that the worldwide scientific community has over 3 million members, although the number of believers is much greater. "
Scientists world - - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 272. "The objective of both religion and science is to find 'truth'.' Since the 18th century Enlightenment, though, Westerners have worshiped science almost as a religion. Bolstered by the thinking of the 19th-century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, this trend culminated in the secular 'God is dead' philosophy articulated by radical theologian Thomas J. J. Altizer in the 1960's and 1970's. But today, with the millennium in sight, the powerful countertrend of the religious revival is repudiating blind faith in science and technology.

Science and technology do not tell us what life means. We learn that through literature, the arts, and spirituality. "

Scientists world - - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 273. "With the rejection of science as religion has come the rise of the feminine in the most patriarchal of institutions, churches. "
Scientists world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "SCIENTISM: the WORSHIP of SCIENCE or claim that only scientific knowledge is VALID or TRUE knowledge. "
Scientists world - - - - 1998 Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe. "Religion " in The Future Now: Predicting the 21st Century. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson (1998); pg. 41. "Marxism and Nazism were crude, looking-glass images of religion. Real religion has seen both off. but we still live in societies with worldly priorities, daunting anxieties, susceptibility to charisma and hunger for 'final solutions.' Some secular ideologies already seem to be practising in front of the mirror. Environmentalism sidles into earth-worship. On its sillier edge, feminism erects the mother of all idols and advocates the idiocies of 'Goddess-consciousness'. Mad capitalists celebrate their own millennium... There are scientists who worship Science, replace providence with the selfish gene and venerate Darwin as their prophet. All these threaten to be the post-religions of the future. If past form is anything to go by, as with Marxism and Nazism, real religion will outlive them. "
Scientists world - - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998); [Orig. source: Religion Watch newsletter (1998-JUN, Volume 13, #8)] "75% of scientists worldwide believe in God "
Scientology Alaska - - 1
unit
- 1978 *LINK* linked to Brett Achorn's OPPOSING VIEW web site "Hard Data on Scientology " (1998) Organization count based on very detailed analysis of incorporations, creations, closures, etc.
Scientology Alaska - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998); section: "Global Locator for Scientology Organizations " Counted listings of churches and missions in directory. "Church of Scientology Mission of Anchorage, 1300 E. 68TH Ave., Suite 208A, Anchorage, AK 99518 "
Scientology Argentina - - - - 1999 *LINK* web page: "Scientology Worldwide " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999); "Last Update on 10th Feb. 1999 " Number here ( "# congregations ") represent total of all orgs: Dianetic Centers, Celebrity Centers, missions, etc.; "CoS web sites have lists of Missions (1998) & Orgs (1996) from which the Table below is derived. Original concept and research by 'Inducto'. "
Scientology Arizona - - 1
unit
- 1991 *LINK* linked to Brett Achorn's OPPOSING VIEW web site "Hard Data on Scientology " (1998) Organization count based on very detailed analysis of incorporations, creations, closures, etc.
Scientology Arizona - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998); section: "Global Locator for Scientology Organizations " Counted listings of churches and missions in directory. "Church of Scientology of Arizona, 2111 W. University Drive, Mesa, Arizona 85201 "
Scientology Australia 120,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* linked to Brett Achorn's OPPOSING VIEW web site "Hard Data on Scientology " (1998) "Mark Hanna, in a letter to the Editor of the Independent (A Queensland University Newspaper) late 1995 advised that [Australia membership] was 120,000... considerable doubt [if] figure quoted by CofS is accurate. "
Scientology Australia 100,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* linked to Brett Achorn's OPPOSING VIEW web site "Hard Data on Scientology " (1998) "Ms. Kee in a letter to the Editor of the Sun Herald 9/2/96 advised thatthe CofS membership in Australia is 100,00. There is considerable doubt [that] figure quoted by the CofS is accurate. "
Scientology Australia 1,488 0.01% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Listed in table as "Church of Scientology "]
Scientology Australia 1,488 0.01% 8
units
- 1996 *LINK* web site: "News From Bree "; web page: "Millions of Members? " (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); "Last Update on 29th November 1998 " "The 1996 Australian Census included an optional question on religious affiliation. 13.2 million Australians (74%) answered the question, of whom 1,488 claimed to be CoS members... With 6 Missions, 2 Orgs that gives 186 members per service unit. "
Scientology Australia 4,000 - 12
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The Church arrived in Australia in 1957, and now has 12 churches and missions, including one in each capital city and a Continental Liaison Office. The Church of Scientology has an estimated 4000 members in Australia with 500 participating in full time service within the movement. "
Scientology Australia - - 9
units
- 1999 *LINK* web page (OPPOSING VIEW): "Scientology Worldwide " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999); "Last Update on 10th Feb. 1999 " Number here ( "# congregations ") represent total of all orgs: Dianetic Centers, Celebrity Centers, missions, etc.; "CoS web sites have lists of Missions (1998) & Orgs (1996) from which the Table below is derived. Original concept and research by 'Inducto'. "
Scientology Austria - - 5
units
- 1999 *LINK* web page (OPPOSING VIEW): "Scientology Worldwide " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999); "Last Update on 10th Feb. 1999 " Number here ( "# congregations ") represent total of all orgs: Dianetic Centers, Celebrity Centers, missions, etc.; "CoS web sites have lists of Missions (1998) & Orgs (1996) from which the Table below is derived. Original concept and research by 'Inducto'. "
Scientology Belgium - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web page (OPPOSING VIEW): "Scientology Worldwide " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999); "Last Update on 10th Feb. 1999 " Number here ( "# congregations ") represent total of all orgs: Dianetic Centers, Celebrity Centers, missions, etc.; "CoS web sites have lists of Missions (1998) & Orgs (1996) from which the Table below is derived. Original concept and research by 'Inducto'. "
Scientology British Columbia - - 3
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998); section: "Global Locator for Scientology Organizations " [last updated 1997-1998] Counted listings of churches and missions in directory. Ch. of Sci. Chinese Vancouver Mission, Vancouver, BC; Church of Scientology Mission of Halifax, Halifax, Nova Scotia; Eglise de Scientologie Mission de Beauce, Ville De St-Georges, Beauce, QC; Ch. of Sci. Mission of Vancouver, Vancouver, B.C.; Ch. of Sci. Mission of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia
Scientology California - - 46
units
- 1995 *LINK* linked to Brett Achorn's OPPOSING VIEW web site "Hard Data on Scientology " (1998) Organization count based on very detailed analysis of incorporations, creations, closures, etc.
Scientology California - - 23
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998); section: "Global Locator for Scientology Organizations " Counted listings of churches and missions in directory. (1) Church of Scientology Mission (CoSM) of Antelope Valley, Palmdale, CA.; (2) CoSM of Bay Cities, Concord; (3) CoSM Beverly Hills, Beverly Hills; (4) CoSM Brand Blvd., Glendale; (5) CoS of Burbank, North Hollywood; (6) CoSM of Buenaventura, Ventura; (7) CoSM of Capitol, Fair Oaks; (8) CoSM Santa Clara Valley, Santa Clara; (9) CoSM The Diablo Valley, Walnut Creek; (10) CoSM Escondido, Escondido; (11) CoSM The Foothills, Montrose; (12) CoSM Marin, San Rafael; (13) CoSM Palo Alto, Palo Alto; (14) CoSM Redwood City, Redwood City; (15) CoSM River Park, Sacramento; (16) CoSM San Bernadino, Redlands; (17) CoSM The San Fernando Valley, Van Nuys; (18) CoSM San Francisco, 3rd Floor, San Francisco; (19) CoSM San Jose, San Jose; (20) CoSM Santa Rosa, Santa Rosa; (21) CoSM Sherman Oaks, Sherman Oaks; (22) CoSM West Valley, Chatsworth; (23) CoSM Westwood, Santa Monica
Scientology Canada - - 11
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998); section: "Global Locator for Scientology Organizations " [last updated 1998] Counted listings of churches and missions in directory. Also: this Scientology directory page AND this Scientology link with Canadian locations
Scientology Canada - - 11
units
- 1999 *LINK* web page (OPPOSING VIEW): "Scientology Worldwide " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999); "Last Update on 10th Feb. 1999 " Number here ( "# congregations ") represent total of all orgs: Dianetic Centers, Celebrity Centers, missions, etc.; "CoS web sites have lists of Missions (1998) & Orgs (1996) from which the Table below is derived. Original concept and research by 'Inducto'. "


Scientology, continued

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