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Salvation Army - Chinese corps, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Salvation Army - Chinese corps USA 36 - 2
units
- 1896 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 50. "...1896... when a Chinese corps was finally opened later the same year, the pioneer officer was Captain May Jackson. With its gaslights, two 'little dragon flags,' and John 3:16 in Chinese characters on the wall, the Chinese corps was a triumph from the start; by the end of the year 36 Chinese had been saved, and a second corps was opened in San Jose. Prominent Army visitors to San Francisco always wanted to visit its exotic Oriental outpost... "
Salvation Army - Chinese corps USA - - 1
unit
- 1959 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 202. "Two traditional ethnic ministries continued to thrive. The Chinatown Corps in San Francisco, opened in 1896, had outlived the vicissitudes of 166 different officers until 1959, and had somehow survived them all as the Army's only Chinese corps in the United States. "
Salvation Army - Chinese corps USA - - 1
unit
- 1965 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 202. "In 1959 Captain Check Hung Yee was given the command, and the [Chinese] corps [in Chinatown, San Francisco] began to prosper. By the mid-1960s there were almost three hundred Chinese involved in one or another of the helpful activities offered by the energetic and resourceful Yee. "
Salvation Army - Chinese corps USA - - 1
unit
- 1978 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 202. "In 1959 Captain Check Hung Yee was given the command, and the [Chinese] corps [in Chinatown, San Francisco] began to prosper. By the mid-1960s there were almost three hundred Chinese involved in one or another of the helpful activities offered by the energetic and resourceful Yee... In 1978 the Chinatown Corps began to produce a fifteen-minute religious televisoin program in two dialects of Chinese and in English... "
Salvation Army - employees USA 33,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 222. "The Army conducts its religious and social programs in all 50 states... through 10,591 centers of operation, including 6,313 service extension units. These are administered by more than 5,000 officers, assisted by about 30,333 employees. "
Salvation Army - employees world 50,000 - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 147. "Full-time ministers of religion (or 'officers' holding military rank) number about 17,000 worldwide, and are headed by a General elected by a High Council. There are more than 50,000 employees, and many of the lay 'soldiers' expend a great effort in a variety of evangelistic, social, musical and other activities. "
Salvation Army - German corps New York - - 2
units
- 1893 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 49. "A German corps was opened in Buffalo in 1893, and then a second in New York. "
Salvation Army - German corps New York: New York City - - 1
unit
- 1893 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 49. "A German corps was opened in Buffalo in 1893, and then a second in New York. "
Salvation Army - German corps Ohio: Cincinnati - - 2
units
- 1894 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 49. "The few Germans converts secured by the Army preferred to attend English-speaking corps in order to learn the new language. Half the soldiers in Cincinnati's two flourishing American corps spoke or understood German in 1894, for instance, while the two small German corps languished. "
Salvation Army - German corps USA - - 21
units
- 1898 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 49. "A German corps was opened in Buffalo in 1893, and then a second in New York. Within five years there were twenty-one German corps in America, located in cities with large German populations ike Buffalo, Hoboken, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Milwaukee, and San Francisco. "
Salvation Army - Japanese corps California - - 4
units
- 1919 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 129. "The pioneers returned to California on July 24, 1919. Joined by three Japanese-American converts from the Chicago training school, they opened the first Japanese corps in the country in San Francisco in August; Los Angeles followed in September, Fresno in October, Stockton by Christmas. "
Salvation Army - Japanese corps California - - 5
units
- 1920 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 130. "[Japanese] Corps were opened in Sacramento in 1920... A Japanese post was opened in Seattle in 1922, and in Oakland in 1923. " [Sacramento was fifth in California, after San Francisco, Fresno, L.A. and Stockton were opened in 1919.]
Salvation Army - Japanese corps California - - 6
units
- 1921 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 130. "Nevertheless, the Japanese ministry prospered on the Golden Shore [California]. Corps were opened in Sacramento in 1920, the same year that Captain and Mrs Soichi Ozaki were sent from San Francisco to commence operations (again) in the Hawaiian Islands. The Visalia corps was pioneered in 1921, and on November 6 of that year a full-fledged Japanese divisional headquarters was dedicated in San Francisco by none other than the elderly Commissioner Booth-Tucker... " [previous 5 California Japanese corps: San Francisco, Los Angeles, Stockton, Sacramento, Fresno.]
Salvation Army - Japanese corps California - - 7
units
- 1923 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 130. "[Japanese] Corps were opened in Sacramento in 1920... A Japanese post was opened in Seattle in 1922, and in Oakland in 1923. " [Sacramento, Visalia and Oakland were fifth, sixth & seventh in California, after San Francisco, Fresno, L.A. and Stockton were opened in 1919.]
Salvation Army - Japanese corps California - - 8
units
- 1924 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 130-131. "By 1924, when San Jose was launched, the Japanese ministry boasted, in addition to the nine Japanese corps and the Home of Rest, a medical clinic, children's home, and a Japanese-language version of The War Cry with a weekly circulation of five thousand. " [San Jose became 8th Japanese corps in California. Other one in Seattle, & perhaps Hawaii.]
Salvation Army - Japanese corps California: Fresno - - 1
unit
- 1919 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 129. "The pioneers returned to California on July 24, 1919. Joined by three Japanese-American converts from the Chicago training school, they opened the first Japanese corps in the country in San Francisco in August; Los Angeles followed in September, Fresno in October, Stockton by Christmas. "
Salvation Army - Japanese corps California: Los Angeles - - 1
unit
- 1919 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 129. "The pioneers returned to California on July 24, 1919. Joined by three Japanese-American converts from the Chicago training school, they opened the first Japanese corps in the country in San Francisco in August; Los Angeles followed in September, Fresno in October, Stockton by Christmas. "
Salvation Army - Japanese corps California: Oakland - - 1
unit
- 1923 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 130. "A Japanese post was opened in Seattle in 1922, and in Oakland in 1923. " [Oakland was fifth in California, after San Francisco, Fresno, L.A. and Stockton were opened in 1919.]
Salvation Army - Japanese corps California: Sacramento - - 1
unit
- 1920 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 130. "[Japanese] Corps were opened in Sacramento in 1920... A Japanese post was opened in Seattle in 1922, and in Oakland in 1923. " [Sacramento was fifth in California, after San Francisco, Fresno, L.A. and Stockton were opened in 1919.]
Salvation Army - Japanese corps California: San Francisco - - 1
unit
- 1919 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 129. "The pioneers returned to California on July 24, 1919. Joined by three Japanese-American converts from the Chicago training school, they opened the first Japanese corps in the country in San Francisco in August; Los Angeles followed in September, Fresno in October, Stockton by Christmas. "
Salvation Army - Japanese corps Hawaii - - 1
unit
- 1920 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 130. "Nevertheless, the Japanese ministry prospered on the Golden Shore [California]. Corps were opened in Sacramento in 1920, the same year that Captain and Mrs Soichi Ozaki were sent from San Francisco to commence operations (again) in the Hawaiian Islands. "
Salvation Army - Japanese corps USA - - 4
units
- 1919 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 129. "The pioneers returned to California on July 24, 1919. Joined by three Japanese-American converts from the Chicago training school, they opened the first Japanese corps in the country in San Francisco in August; Los Angeles followed in September, Fresno in October, Stockton by Christmas. "
Salvation Army - Japanese corps USA 5,000 - 9
units
- 1924 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 130-131. "By 1924, when San Jose was launched, the Japanese ministry boasted, in addition to the nine Japanese corps and the Home of Rest, a medical clinic, children's home, and a Japanese-language version of The War Cry with a weekly circulation of five thousand. "
Salvation Army - Japanese corps USA - - - - 1945 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 182. [After close of World War II:] "One old ministry was gone: the Japanese Division was not restored after the war, nor were the few Japanese officers who had remained loyal sent back to California; the valiant Imai was sent to command a Japanese corps in Hawaii. "
Salvation Army - Japanese corps Washington - - 1
unit
- 1922 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 130. "A Japanese post was opened in Seattle in 1922, and in Oakland in 1923. "
Salvation Army - officers Canada 1,990 - - - 1986 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 215. "Salvation Army... Membership: In 1986... There were 565 centers and churches in and 1,991 ministers in Canada. "
Salvation Army - officers North America 7,291 - - - 1986 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 215. "Salvation Army... Membership: In 1986, the Army reported 432,893 members, 10,591 corps (churches), and 5,301 officers in the U.S. There were 565 centers and churches in and 1,991 ministers in Canada. "
Salvation Army - officers USA 15,217 - - - 1970 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 216. "...the number of corps has declined steadily since 1950 (1,380 to 1,074),... and the number of adult local officers (the most active category of adult member: the sergeants, treasurers, musicians, Sunday school teachers) since 1970 (15,217 to 14,346 [1978]). "
Salvation Army - officers USA 14,346 - - - 1978 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 216. "In the Eastern territory, membership has actually declined in absolute numbers since 1927, and attendance at Army religious services has been decreasing in the Central territory since 1947. Returns on the national level are even more disquieting: the number of corps has declined steadily since 1950 (1,380 to 1,074), the number of bandsmen since 1960 (6,097 to 4,149 [1978]), and the number of adult local officers (the most active category of adult member: the sergeants, treasurers, musicians, Sunday school teachers) since 1970 (15,217 to 14,346 [1978]). "
Salvation Army - officers USA 5,301 - - - 1986 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 19th Century Holiness; pg. 215. "Salvation Army... Membership: In 1986, the Army reported 432,893 members, 10,591 corps (churches), and 5,301 officers in the U.S. "
Salvation Army - officers USA 5,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 222. "The Army conducts its religious and social programs in all 50 states... through 10,591 centers of operation, including 6,313 service extension units. These are administered by more than 5,000 officers, assisted by about 30,333 employees. "
Salvation Army - officers world 17,000 - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 147. "Full-time ministers of religion (or 'officers' holding military rank) number about 17,000 worldwide, and are headed by a General elected by a High Council. There are more than 50,000 employees, and many of the lay 'soldiers' expend a great effort in a variety of evangelistic, social, musical and other activities. "
Salvation Army - officers world 25,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 222. "Today the Salvation Army works in 89 lands with approx. 25,000 officers... "
Salvation Army - Scandinavian corps Connecticut - - 2
units
- 1980 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 203. "The Eastern territory has 8 'Scandinavian' corps.; in five of them--New York Central Citadel on East Fifty-second Street; Worcester, Massachusetts, Quinsigamond Corps; Brooklyn Bay Ridge and Jameston Temple in New York--the Swedish language is still frequently used in services... The remaining four corps are Erie Temple, Pennsylvania; Providence, Rhode Island; Hartford Temple and New Britain, Connecticut. "
Salvation Army - Scandinavian corps Illinois - - 5
units
- 1980 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 202-203. "Five ['Scandinavian'] corps still exist in Illinois; three in Chicago (Mt. Greenwood, Irving Park and Andersonville); Moline and Rockford Temple "
Salvation Army - Scandinavian corps Illinois: Chicago - - 3
units
- 1980 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 202-203. "Five ['Scandinavian'] corps still exist in Illinois; three in Chicago (Mt. Greenwood, Irving Park and Andersonville); Moline and Rockford Temple "
Salvation Army - Scandinavian corps Massachusetts - - 1
unit
- 1980 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 203. "The Eastern territory has 8 'Scandinavian' corps.; in five of them--New York Central Citadel on East Fifty-second Street; Worcester, Massachusetts, Quinsigamond Corps; Brooklyn Bay Ridge and Jameston Temple in New York--the Swedish language is still frequently used in services... The remaining four corps are Erie Temple, Pennsylvania; Providence, Rhode Island; Hartford Temple and New Britain, Connecticut. "
Salvation Army - Scandinavian corps Minnesota - - 4
units
- 1980 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 202-203. "Five ['Scandinavian'] corps still exist in Illinois; 3 in Chicago (Mt. Greenwood, Irving Park and Andersonville); Moline and Rockford Temple; and four in Minnesota: Minneapolis Temple & Central Avenue; St. Paul Temple & Duluth Temple. "
Salvation Army - Scandinavian corps New York - - 3
units
- 1980 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 203. "The Eastern territory has 8 'Scandinavian' corps.; in five of them--New York Central Citadel on East Fifty-second Street; Worcester, Massachusetts, Quinsigamond Corps; Brooklyn Bay Ridge and Jameston Temple in New York--the Swedish language is still frequently used in services; Jamestown Temple even sponsors a Swedish-language radio program. The remaining four corps are Erie Temple, Pennsylvania; Providence, Rhode Island; Hartford Temple and New Britain, Connecticut. "
Salvation Army - Scandinavian corps Pennsylvania - - 1
unit
- 1980 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 203. "The Eastern territory has 8 'Scandinavian' corps.; in five of them--New York Central Citadel on East Fifty-second Street; Worcester, Massachusetts, Quinsigamond Corps; Brooklyn Bay Ridge and Jameston Temple in New York--the Swedish language is still frequently used in services... The remaining four corps are Erie Temple, Pennsylvania; Providence, Rhode Island; Hartford Temple and New Britain, Connecticut. "
Salvation Army - Scandinavian corps Rhode Island - - 1
unit
- 1980 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 203. "The Eastern territory has 8 'Scandinavian' corps.; in five of them--New York Central Citadel on East Fifty-second Street; Worcester, Massachusetts, Quinsigamond Corps; Brooklyn Bay Ridge and Jameston Temple in New York--the Swedish language is still frequently used in services... The remaining four corps are Erie Temple, Pennsylvania; Providence, Rhode Island; Hartford Temple and New Britain, Connecticut. "
Salvation Army - Scandinavian corps USA - - 49
units
- 1907 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 48. -
Salvation Army - Scandinavian corps USA - - 17
units
- 1980 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 202-203. "...the Scandinavian heritage continues to enliven parts of The Salvation Army in the Central & Eastern territories. Despite... [end of] separate administrative divisions, many Scandinavian Salvationists have doggedly kept alive their several delightful traditions... & have raised their children & grandchildren to share their affection for the old festivals & songs. 5 such corps still exist in Illinois; 3 in Chicago (Mt. Greenwood, Irving Park and Andersonville); Moline and Rockford Temple; & 4 in Minnesota: Minneapolis Temple & Central Avenue; St. Paul Temple & Duluth Temple. The Eastern territory has 8 'Scandinavian' corps... "
Salvation Army - Swedish corps California: San Francisco - - 1
unit
- 1899 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 48. "The Scandinavian ministry was extended to the Pacific Coast on February 26, 1899, when a mission was opened in San Francisco to reach Swedish sailors. "
Salvation Army - Swedish corps Illinois: Chicago - - 6
units
- 1894 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 48. "Her [Hanna Ouchterlony] services in Chicago were particularly successful: by 1894, there were six Swedish corps in that city, crowned by the famous Chicago No. 13. "
Salvation Army - Swedish corps Minnesota - - 1
unit
- 1888 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 47-48. "The 'Saved Swedes' of Brooklyn No. 3 soon had company. Other cities with large Swedish populations promptly opened missions among them. The first west of New York was in Minneapolis, in April, 1888; then St. Paul, and Chicago, where Scandinavian work prospered as nowhere else. "
Salvation Army - Swedish corps New York: New York City - - 1
unit
- 1887 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 47. "The mission to Scandinavian immigrants began in a characteristically spontaneous way. In the winter of 1887 four Swedish laundresses... began holding services in their native language after the regular services were over... Ballington Booth appointed the sisters to command the new corps, Brooklyn No. 3, which opened on December 23, 1887. The work progressed with amazing rapidity; clearly The War Cry was right in boasting that the Swedes were 'a nationality peculiarly affected by our methods and doctrines.' "
Salvation Army - Swedish corps USA - - 1
unit
- 1887 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 47. "The mission to Scandinavian immigrants began in a characteristically spontaneous way. In the winter of 1887 four Swedish laundresses... began holding services in their native language after the regular services were over... Ballington Booth appointed the sisters to command the new corps, Brooklyn No. 3, which opened on December 23, 1887. The work progressed with amazing rapidity; clearly The War Cry was right in boasting that the Swedes were 'a nationality peculiarly affected by our methods and doctrines.' " [First Swedish Salvation Army corps in the U.S.A.]
Salvation Army Church Maryland: Baltimore - - - - 1915 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 115. "In December 1913, Brigadier A.E. Kimball... wrote in despair to the national chief secretary, pleading for 'some way out of the present difficulty we have in connection with so many Armies.'... In Baltimore there were... the Samaritan Army, the American Gospel Band, and the Salvation Army Church (not connected with The Salvation Army), all operating in the year 1915. "
Samaritan Israel - - - - 30 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 273. "But Jesus stretches the definition further, telling one of his most famous parables about a Samaritan--one of a mixed race living between Galilee and Judea who were especially loathed by the Jews after some Samaritans had desecrated the Temple... "
Samaritan Israel - - 1
unit
- 1966 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 112. "The second great event... was the Israeli capture of Nablus in 1967. Before the Six Day War, the two Samaritan communities had been separated by an international border. Holon's Samaritans were only allowed to visit Nablus on Passover. Even that pilgrimage had been forbidden in the early years after 1948. Later, it was subject to Jordanian whims. "
Samaritan Israel - - 2
units
- 1968 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 112. "The second great event... was the Israeli capture of Nablus in 1967. Before the Six Day War, the two Samaritan communities had been separated by an international border. Holon's Samaritans were only allowed to visit Nablus on Passover. Even that pilgrimage had been forbidden in the early years after 1948. Later, it was subject to Jordanian whims. "
Samaritan Israel 500 - 2
units
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 99. In Israel, "in what is now the city of Nablus on the West Bank of the Jordan River, the tiny sect of Samaritans has survived since biblical times... They have lived as an independent people for more than two thousand years: as neither Moslems, Christians, nor Jews. Five hundred Samaritans survive today... About half of them still live in Nablus; the other half live in the Tel Aviv suburb Holon. "
Samaritan Israel - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "SAMARITANS: the descendants of the Northern kingdom of ISRAEL who intermarried with local people thus gaining the scorn and enmity of ORTHODOX JEWS who retained their racial purity. They refused to recognize the TEMPLE in JERUSALEM as the center of WORSHIP, and built their own Temple on Mount Gerizim. The Samaritans accept their own version of PENTATEUCH but reject other parts of the HEBREW BIBLE. "
Samaritan Israel - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 215. "Samaritans: The descendants of the people settled in Samaria, in the Northern Kingdom, after the ten tribes had been deported by the king of Assyria in 722 BCE. The verse in the book of 2 Kings (17:24) states: 'The king of Assyria brought [people] from Babylon, Cuthah, Avva, Hamath and Sepharvim, and he settled them in the towns of Samaria in place of the Israelites; they took possession of Samaria and dwelt in its towns.' "
Samaritan Israel - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 215. "The passage continues that these foreign peoples worshipped their own gods but God let loose lions among them, as result of which the king of Assyria ordered a priest to be sent to teach them the worship of the true God. After the name Cuthah, one of the places from which these people came, the Samaritans are called Cuthim... The Rabbis understood the story in the book of Kings to mean that the Cuthim were eventually converted to Judaism, the only question being whether they were true converts or only 'lion converts', that is, never really converted to the true faith but only pretending to have been converted out of their fear of the lions. The conclusion in the Talmud is that their descendants are fully Jewish even though they do not keep al the precepts. Nevertheless, according to the Talmud (Hullin 6a), Rabbi Meir, hearing that some Samaritans had worshipped a dove on Mount Gerizim, declared that all Samaritans must henceforth be treated as if they were idolaters. "
Samaritan Israel - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 215. "Samaritans: ...The story of the dove is, of course, legendary. The Samaritans were monotheists and worshipped God on Mount Gerizim. Behind all this are echoes of the conflict in ancient times between the Samaritans and the Jews, the Samaritans claiming, in fact, that they were the descendants of the ancient Israelites and that the story in the book of Kings is a false account of their origins. The book of Nehemiah (ch. 4) relates how the Samaritans sought to prevent the Jews rebuilding Jerusalem after the return from the Babylonian exile.

For the Samaritans the central holy place is not Jerusalem but Mount Gerizim in Samaria. For them, too, only the Pentatech, of which they have their own version, is sacred and they reject the prophetic and the other books of the Bible. "

Samaritan Israel: Nablus 250 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 647. "Samaritans. Descendants of the original inhabitants of biblical Samaria, estroyed in 722 B.C., who claim to be a remnant of the northern tribes of Israel. More than half of the few hundred survivors of this grop live in the city of Nablus, close to their sacred mountain, Gerizim, on the West Bank of the Jordan. "
Samaritan Israel: Nablus 250 - 1
unit
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 99. "Five hundred Samaritans survive today... About half of them still live in Nablus; the other half live in the Tel Aviv suburb Holon. "
Samaritan Israel: Tel Aviv 250 - 1
unit
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 99. "Five hundred Samaritans survive today... About half of them still live in Nablus; the other half live in the Tel Aviv suburb Holon. "
Samaritan Jordan - - 1
unit
- 1966 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 112. "The second great event... was the Israeli capture of Nablus in 1967. Before the Six Day War, the two Samaritan communities had been separated by an international border. Holon's Samaritans were only allowed to visit Nablus on Passover. Even that pilgrimage had been forbidden in the early years after 1948. Later, it was subject to Jordanian whims. "
Samaritan Jordan - - - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Jordan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 49. "A small number of Druze... live near the Syrian border, along with Samaritans and Circassians. The Samaritans are descendants of an ancient Jewish sect... "
Samaritan Jordan - - - - 1999 Camerapix. Spectrum Guide to Jordan. Brooklyn, NY: Interlink Books (1999); pg. 67. "There are also a few small communities of Samarians, people claiming to belong to an ancient Jewish sect, with descent that stems from the House of Joseph. They accept the first five books of the Bible's teachings -- the Pentateuch -- refusing to regard any others as credible. "
Samaritan Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 221. "Samaritans: A small sect who regard Mount Gerazim in Jordan as sacred and who celebrate Passover there. "
Samaritan Palestine 300,000 - - - 100 C.E. Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 105. "In Roman times, three hundred thousand Samaritans are estimated to have lived in Palestine and perhaps half that many outside it. "


Samaritan, continued

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