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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia, Venezuela

Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia Virginia - - 2
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998) Counted listings in directory of parishes.
Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia Washington - - 2
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998) Counted listings in directory of parishes.
Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia Washington, D.C. - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998) Counted listings in directory of parishes. Geographic region is listed here as "District of Columbia ", not "Washington, D.C. "
Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia West Virginia - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998) Counted listings in directory of parishes.
Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia Wisconsin - - 3
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site (1998) Counted listings in directory of parishes.
Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia world 55,000 - 81
units
- 1955 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 62. -
Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia world - - 197
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 133. "Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia... Membership: In 1988 the Church reported 135 parishes in the U.S., 25 parishes in Canada, and 37 parishes in South America. There were approximately 100,000 members in the United States. There are affiliated congregations on every continent. "
Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America North America 55,000 - 81
units
- 1851 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 185. "The Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church, whose membership in 1951 numbered 55,000 in 81 churches, now has 13 archbishops and bishops and 1 million members in 440 churches. "
Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America North America 1,000,000 - 440
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 185. "The Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church, whose membership in 1951 numbered 55,000 in 81 churches, now has 13 archbishops and bishops and 1 million members in 440 churches. "
Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America USA 755,000 - - - 1957 Spence, Hartzell. The Story of America's Religions; New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1960) [1st printing 1957]; pg. 117. "Orthodoxy in America today is divided into 23 dif. groups... There are 3 Russian constituencies totalling more than 810,000 worshipers, of whom 755,000 are in the Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America. "
Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America USA 750,000 - 350
units
- 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 246. "Here the Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of North America, which claims 750,000 members in 350,000 churches, considers the jurisdiction of the Moscow patriarchate 'in suspension' until the patriarchate is free of Communist rule. "
Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America USA 750,000 - - - 1963 Rosten, Leo (ed.). Religions in America; New York: Simon & Schuster (1963), 8th ed. [1st pub. in 1952. 8th ed. completely revised]; pg. 94. "There are three leading Russian branches, totaling over 800,000. (By far the largest of these is the Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America, which was independently established here after the Russian Revolution, w/ about 750,000 worshipers.) "
Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America world 850,000 - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973); pg. 28. "In America there are three separate jurisdictions of the Russian Church, all of which hold the same doctrines and the same liturgy. The largest is the Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of America, with about 850,000 members, under the independent Metropolitan of America and Canada. There is also the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia, the metropolitan of which has been in New York since 1950. In addition, there is a group of parishes directly under the jurisdiction of the Patriarch of Moscow. "
Russian Orthodox, Patriarchal Exarchate USA 160,000 - 32
units
- 1970 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 992. "'Guide to Orthodox America'... lists 336 parishes in the Russian Orthodox church, 32 in the Patriarchal Exarchate... reported membership in 1970... was, respectfully... 700,000, 160,000... "
Russian Ukraine Evangelical Baptist Union, USA USA 1,400 - 26
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "; [Listed in table as "Russian Ukraine Evangelical Baptist Union, USA, Inc. "]
Rutul Russia: Dagestan 20,000 - - - 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 294-295. Table with 2 columns: "Ethnic Group " [not religious groups] & "Population "; Pg. 295: "Aside from the Mountain Jews and the Christian Cossacks, the peoples of Dagestan are almost exclusively Muslim. "
Ryobu Shinto Japan - - - - 575 C.E. Rutherford, Scott (ed.) East Asia. London: Apa Publications (1998); pg. 283. "As early as the sixth century, for example, Ryobu Shinto began to emerge as a syncretic compromise with Buddhism. In this hybrid belief system, kamisama were regarded as temporary manifestations of the Buddhist deities. "
Ryobu Shinto Japan - - - - 1300 C.E. Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 145. "Ryobu Shinto: 'Two-sided' or 'Dual' Shinto. The full name is Ryobu shugo shinto or Daishiryu-shinto. An interpretation of kami beliefs and practices developed in the Kamakura period and maintained by the Shingo school of esoteric Buddhism... "
Ryobu Shinto Japan - - - - 1300 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 633. "Ryobu Shinto... In medieval Japan a syncretistic coordination of Buddhist divinities with the Kami of Japanese religion. For example, the Sun Goddess Amaterasu was equated with the Sun Buddha Vairocana, and the inner and outer shrines at Ise came be be regarded as representing the two Mandalas of Shingon. "
Ryobu Shinto Japan - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "RYOBU-SHINTO: a SYNCRETISTIC movement which sought to unify JAPANESE SHINT with BUDDHISM. It was suppressed during the Meiji period from 1868-1912 although certain FORMS still prosper today. "
Sabaot Kenya - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Sabbatarian Adventists world 300 - - - 1850 Conkin, Paul K. American Originals: Homemade Varieties of Christianity, The University of North Carolina Press: Chapel Hill, NC (1997); pg. 134. "As late as 1850 the Sabbatarian Adventists [precursors to Seventh-day Adventists] probably numbered no more than 300. "
Sabbatarian Adventists world 3,000 - - - 1856 Conkin, Paul K. American Originals: Homemade Varieties of Christianity, The University of North Carolina Press: Chapel Hill, NC (1997); pg. 135. "After the relocation to Battle Creek, the movement grew slowly each year, with perhaps 3,000 members by the Civil War. " [Sabbatarian Adventists--precursors to Seventh-day Adventists]
Sabellianism world - - - - 200 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "SABELLIANISM: an early CHRISTIAN HERESY which insisted on the unity of the Godhead by arguing that the persons of the TRINITY were actually different modes or operations of GOD. "
Sac Kansas - - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 28. "Recent figures for the Kansas Sac and Fox are 300. "
Sac Oklahoma 996 - - - 1950 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 28. "The 1950 population figure for the Oklahoma Sac was 996. "
Sac USA - - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 28. "Their descendants live on reservations in Oklahoma, Kansas, and Iowa with the Fox. The 1950 population figure for the Oklahoma Sac was 996. Recent figures for the Kansas Sac and Fox are 300. "
Sac and Fox USA 4,517 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Sacred Heart Catholic Church world 50 - 3
units
- 1983 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 133. "The Sacred Heart Catholic Church was founded in 1980 by Archbishop James Augustine Arrendale and other former members of Archbishop James Lashley's American Catholic Church, Archdiocese of New York... The group adheres to the teachings of the Seven Ecumenical Councils and the three Ecumenical Creeds. Archbishop Arrendale died in 1985 and the future course of the Archdiocese is in doubt. Membership: In 1983 the Church reported three parishes, two priests, and 50 members. "
Saddleback Valley Community Church world 4,000 - - - 1991 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992); pg. 254. "in Orange County, Saddleback Valley Community Church is a flourishing congregation of more than 4,000 that was founded in 1980.
Sadducees Israel - - - - 30 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton; pg. 466. "By the time of Jesus... There were three parties among the Jews. The Sadducees were willing to collaborate with the occupying power, the Zealots fomented rebellion, and the Pharisees would neither fraternize nor rebel but kept the law and waited for vindication at the hands of God. "
Sadducees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 640. "Sadducees... They disappeared in A.D. 70 with the destruction of the Temple. Probably attached to the upper classes, the landed gentry, and merchants, and mostly constituted of priests, the Sadducees represented a conservative aristocracy... "
Sadducees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "SADDUCEES: originating in the second century B.C. They were a religious and political GROUP, which rejected such BELIEFS as the RESURRECTION, ANGELS and SPIRITS, that disappeared after the destruction of Jerusalem in 70. In the NEW TESTAMENT they are depicted as the opponents of JESUS. "
Sadducees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Judaism; pg. 265. "Sadducees: Sect that was at odds with the Pharisees because they supported only the written law, strictly interpreted. They centered around Temple life, and after the destruction of the Second Temple in AD 70, they soon faded away. "
Sadducees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. Oxtoby, Willard G. The Meaning of Other Faiths. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press (1983); pg. 24-25. "One option was to treat the Temple worship--its ritual and sacrifices--as the essential thing about Judaism and to collaborate with the Roman rulers in civic matters. This was the position of the Sadducees, and it remained an option as long as the Temple stood, until A.D. 70. "
Sadducees Israel - - - - 100 C.E. Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 213. "Sadducees: Heb. Tzaddukim, one of the three main parties in the late Second Temple period, the others being the Pharisees and the Essenes... " [More.]
Sadducees world - - - - -50 B.C.E. *LINK* web site: "Karaite Korner "; web page: "History of Karaism " (viewed 14 March 1999). Copyright 1998-1999 by Nehemia Gordon and Devorah Gordon. "The first reference in the history of Israel to more than one sect takes place some 200 years after the close of the Biblical period, in the first century BCE. Various sources tell us of two opposing sects, the Sadducees (Zadokites) and the Pharisees. The Sadducees followed the Torah as it was written while the Pharisees believed in a second 'Oral' Torah which they added to the real one. "
Sadducees world - - - - 200 C.E. *LINK* web site: "Karaite Korner "; web page: "History of Karaism " (viewed 14 March 1999). Copyright 1998-1999 by Nehemia Gordon and Devorah Gordon. "How long these three sects [Sadducees, Essenes, Boethusians] continued to co-exist is unknown. It is often thought that the Essenes and Saducees ceased to exist with the destruction of the Temple in 70 CE. However this seems unlikely as writings of the Essenes appear as late as the 10th century which seems to indicate that they survived well after the destruction of the temple. References to the Sadducees and the Boethusians continue to appear in post-70 CE literature and they also seemed to have survived for some time. "
Sahaj Marg Denmark - - - - 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "Corresponding figures, i.e. a dedicated membership of 30 to 150 in Denmark, are found in groups such as Brahma Kumaris, Elan Vital, Soka Gakkai and Sahaj Marg according to their own information. "
Sahaja Yoga Australia 550 - 36
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Sahaja Yoga came to Australia in 1980. The movement now has 36 centres in Australia with an estimated 550 members. "
Sahaja Yoga Germany 200 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Sahaja Yoga " in table. Source: REMID.
Sahaja Yoga world - - - 60
countries
1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Sahaja Yoga is a spiritual movement 'based on individual awareness and experience rather than institutional belief systems'. The movement was founded in Bombay, India in 1970 by Shri Mataji Nirmala Devi... The number of centres and members worldwide in unknown but Sahaja Yoga is practised in over 60 countries. "
Sahehwamish North America - Pacific Coast 1,200 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Sahehwamish world 1,200 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Saijo Inari-kyo Japan 286,270 0.25% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Buddhist new religion (year of origin: 1951).
Saiqa world 3,000 - - - 1986 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986); pg. 15. [A faction of the PLO, thus a political org. more than a faith group.] "Saiqa (Arabic for Thunderbolt) was founded by the Syrian Ba'ath party in 1969 and continues to reflect its views... Estimated strength: 3,000. "
Sakha Russia 382,000 - - - 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 340-341. "Sakha: Location: Russia (far east Siberia); Population: 382,000 (1989 census); Religion: Native Sakha religion with animist, shamanist, & Russian Orthodox elements "; "Sakha religion derives from Turkic, Mongolic, Tungusic, & Russian ideas. Labels such as 'animist,' 'shamanist,' or 'Russian Orthodox' to not suffice... 19th cen. many Sakha declared themselves as Christian, but this did not mean they viewed Christianity & shamanism as mutually exclusive. Although shamans with full powers are rare, in the 1990s, urban as well as rural Sakha have adapted shamanistic rituals. Current Sakha shamans combine medical & spiritual practice... some Sakha maintain belief in shamans & supernatural powers. Others, struggling to recover spirituality after rejecting Marxist-Leninist materialism, accept aspects of shamanic philosophy. Still others, influenced by Soviet education and science, reject all religion as superstition. "
Salamat Chad - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Salinan North America - Pacific Coast 3,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Salinan world 3,000 - - - 1770 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Salish British Columbia - - - - 1800 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 83. "Salish Tribes... Many groups speaking the Salish language occupied the islands and coasts of the region: Penntlatch, Comox, Homalco, Klhoose, Sliammon, Sechelt, Clallam, Halkomelem, Squamish, Nooksack, aand Northern Straits people. The most numerous and influential were the central coastal Salish (Squamish, Halkomelem, Nooksack, Northern Straits people, and Clallam) who lived in southeastern Vancouver Island. "
Salish North America 600 - - - 1905 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 75. "Salish or Flathead... They numbered 600 in the early 20th century. "
Salish North America 6,700 - - - 1995 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 75. "Salish or Flathead... Driven west by the Blackfeet, the Flathead lived peacefully with Amerian settlers. They gave up their territory to the U.S. government in 1855 for a reservation in Montana. They numbered 600 in the early 20th century. The Flathead reservation, also home to the Kootenay, and Pend d'Oreilles, numbers 6,700 today. "
Salish USA 10,246 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Salish - Puget Sound USA 10,246 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Salvation Army Alabama 1,370 0.03% 16
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 1,290. [Listed as 'Salvation Army.']
Salvation Army Alaska - - 1
unit
- 1898 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 180. "The Salvation Army had arrived in Alaska in 1898 under the auspices of the Canadian branch of the movement. After an initial flurry of heroic evangelism in the Klondike in 1898 and 1899, the work had not flourished among the small white population of the territory. "
Salvation Army Alaska - - 15
units
- 1941 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 180. "After an initial flurry of heroic evangelism in the Klondike in 1898 and 1899, the work had not flourished among the small white population of the territory. Quite different was the case among the Tlinget Indians, a fishing people who lived in small villages along the southeastern coast. A courageous Tlinget Salvationist, Charles Newton... had carried the gospel and the Army's carefree style of worship everywhere among the friendly and receptive Tlinget before he settled down to command the thriving corps at Kake. By the Second World War there were 15 corps in Alaska, all of them except Anchorage 'principally of native identity.' "
Salvation Army Alaska 2,487 0.45% 32
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 2,073. [Listed as 'Salvation Army.']
Salvation Army Arizona 1,945 0.05% 17
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 1,814. [Listed as 'Salvation Army.']
Salvation Army Arkansas 1,041 0.04% 12
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 950. [Listed as 'Salvation Army.']
Salvation Army Australia 77,800 - - - 1986 *LINK* web site: "Growth of Religions in Australia and New South Wales 1986-1996 " Table "Australia " [growth of religion in Australia, 1986-1996]; "Prepared by the Buddhist Council of New South Wales from census data published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics "; "1986 adherents "
Salvation Army Australia 72,300 0.40% - - 1991 *LINK* Government statistics web site (viewed circa Nov. 1998) -
Salvation Army Australia 71,984 - - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "Growth of Religions in Australia and New South Wales 1986-1996 " Table "Australia " [growth of religion in Australia, 1986-1996]; "Prepared by the Buddhist Council of New South Wales from census data published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics "; "1991 adherents "
Salvation Army Australia 74,100 0.40% - - 1996 *LINK* Government statistics web site (viewed circa Nov. 1998) -


Salvation Army, continued

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