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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Roma, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Roma Czech Republic 300,000 2.91% - - 1999 Wire Reports. "Czech hotelier is fined for turning away Gypsy " in Dallas Morning News, 28 Oct. 1999; pg. 18A. "Gypsies, who are also known as Roma... The Czech Republic has been criticized by officials of the European Union for its treatment of its Gypsy minority--an estimated 250,000 to 300,000 among a total Czech population of 10.3 million. "
Roma Europe - - - - 1400 C.E. Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994). [Orig. source: Gropper, Gypsies in the City, pp. 1-16]; pg. 97. "...although their early migration patterns are anything but clear, Gypsies were reported in southeastern Europe (Greece, Hungary, Romania, Serbia) by the 1300s, and in western Europe (France, Germany, Italy, Holland, Switzerland, Spain) by the 1400s. "
Roma Europe - Eastern 5,000,000 - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 100. "How many Gypsies are there in the world today? Estimates vary from 5 to 10 million, with the latter figure probably being closer to the truth. (More than half are in Eastern Europe.) "
Roma Finland 6,000 - - - 1997 McNair, Sylvia. Finland ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997); pg. 80. "The few small minority groups who have lived here for generations differ from the majority more by language or religion than by ties to other lands. They include about 4,400 Sami in the north; 5,000 to 6,000 Romanies (formerly known as Gypsies) scattered throughout Finland... "
Roma Greece - - - - 1400 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 114. "In the 14th and 15th centuries the main centre of Gypsy settlement was in southern Greece, and they were also well established on the island of Corfu. Some probably continued up the Adriatic coast; others had already spread overland. "
Roma Herzegovina - - - - 1300 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 115. "If this speculation about the Ragusan document has any truth in it, Gypsies were present in Hercegovina long before the Turkish conquest. "
Roma Hungary 342,375 3.30% - - 1997 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 262. "Hungary... Population: 10,375,000... Ethnic Background: Magyaar (92.4%); Gypsy (3.3%); German (2.5%), Jewish (0.7%)... "
Roma Hungary 500,000 5.00% - - 1997 Steins, Richard. Hungary: Crossroads of Europe (series: Exploring Cultures of the World). New York: Benchmark Books/Marshall Cavendish (1997); pg. 21-23. "Hungary... Its entire population is only a little over 10 million... About 90% of the people are ethnic Hungarians... The remainder of the population consists of Gypsies; people of Germanic background...; Pg. 22: "...the Gypsies of Hungary, who are the largest ethnic minority in the country today... Today, Hungarian Gypsies do not usually trvel in wagons. They are, however, among the poorest people in Hungary. And they still live apart, in communities on the fringes of large cities. Many of them are poorly paid unskilled workers and day laborers. "
Roma Illinois: Chicago 10,000 - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 101. "Nevertheless, the Rom were in the cities to stay, and today there are a reported 10,000 in Chicago and 15,000 in Los Angeles. "
Roma Macedonia 44,537 2.30% - - 1994 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 370-371. "Macedonia... Population: 1,936,377 (July 1994)... Other minorities include Turks (4%), Romanies (Gypsies, 2.3%), and Serbs (2%). "
Roma New York: New York City 5,000 - - - 1962 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1195. "A more recent estimate, in 1962, placed nearly 5000 gypsies in New York, nearly 10,000 in Los Angeles -- cities where the gypsies tend to congregate during the winter. "
Roma Romania - - - - 1990 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 127. "It now appears, for instance, that the number of Romanian Gypsies may be as high as 2.5 million, making them by far the largest minority in Romania. "
Roma Spain 250,000 - - - 1967 Keefe, Eugene K., et al. Area Handbook for Spain (1st Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975); pg. 114, 130. Pg. 114: "Statistics on Gypsies are notoriously contradictory and unreliable because of official difficulties in classifying them... and because of their habit of registering in many different places according to the advantages gained thereby. One semiofficial estimate for 1967 gave a total for Spain of 250,000 (a suspiciously rounded figure), of whom 5% were nomadic, 80% were sedentary but without a fixed job and permanent residence, and 15% were sedentary with a fixed job and permanent residence. "; Chapter on religious groups (pg. 130): "Such marginal groups as Gypsies constitute a special case; they adhere to a unique syncretic mixture of belief and practice and are also groups about which little is known. "
Roma Spain - - - - 1999 Miller, Arthur. Spain (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 80-81. "One ethnic group exists that has no geographic community. As in other countries in Europe, Gypsies wander from place to place and are a deprived minority. They can be seen on the roads and streets, driving carts, begging, and peddling. There are several hundred thousand Gypsies in Spain. The largest Gypsy communities are found in Granada, Madrid, Barcelona, and Murcia. "
Roma Spain: Madrid 15,000 - - - 1967 Keefe, Eugene K., et al. Area Handbook for Spain (1st Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975); pg. 114. "Gypsies themselves estimated only 15,000 in Madrid. "
Roma United Kingdom: Britain 10,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1201. "The number full-blooded gypsies -- always difficult to ascertain -- is dwindling, and in Britain today probably does not exceed 10,000. Their customs and way of life are also on the decline, many gypsies tending nowadays to reject them. "
Roma United Kingdom: Britain - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1195. "There are four main groups of gypsies in Europe: the Kalderash...; the Gitanos...; the Manush or Sinti...; and the British gypsies who are probably of mixed Kalderash and Sinto stock. "
Roma USA 50,000 - - - 1925 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1195. "Most American gypsies are of Kalderash or Sinto [a.k.a. Manush] families. Early large-scale immigrations came from Britain. In later years gypsies have drifted to America from all over Europe; many hundreds of Serbian and Balkan families came at the time of the First World War. In the 1920s the author Irving Brown estimated some 50,000 gypsies in the United States. "
Roma USA 500,000 - - - 1975 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994). [Orig. source: Peter Maas, King of the Gypsies (New York: Viking, 1975)]; pg. 94. "It is true that no one knows how many Gypsies there are in the United States, although the million figure commonly reported in the press may be too high. More reliable estimates place the figure closer to 500,000. " [See Ian F. Hancock, "Gypsies, " in Stephan Thernstrom, ed., Harvard Encyclopedia of American Ethnic Groups (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1980), p. 441.]
Roma USA 1,000,000 - - - 1975 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994). [Orig. source: Peter Maas, King of the Gypsies (New York: Viking, 1975)]; pg. 94. "On the dust jacket of Peter Maas's controversial and widely read King of the Gypsies, for example, the following blurb appears: 'There are perhaps a million or more Gypsies in the U.S.--nobody knows exactly how many, not even the government.' Given the nature of modern journalism, can this statement be true? The answer is not a simple one... "
Roma USA - - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 101. "While they reside in nearly all the states, the largest Gypsy concentrations are to be found in New York, Virginia, Illinois, Texas, Massachusetts, and on the Pacific Coast. "
Roma world - - - - 1944 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 99. "The climax of persecution came during World War II, when the Nazis murdered between 250,000 and 600,000 Rom. "
Roma world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1195. "There are four main groups of gypsies in Europe: the Kalderash, mainly coppersmiths and tinsmiths based in eastern and central Europe; the Gitanos, centred in the Iberian peninsula, North Afria and the south of France; the Manush or Sinti in France, Germany and northern Italy; and the British gypsies who are probably of mixed Kalderash and Sinto stock. Great numbers of gypsies are also found in Asia, as well as in New Zealand, Australia and America. "
Roma world 10,000,000 - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 100. "How many Gypsies are there in the world today? Estimates vary from 5 to 10 million, with the latter figure probably being closer to the truth... There is a general--though not unanimous--agreement that the Rom are divided into four tribes or nations (natsiyi): the Lowara, Machwaya, Kalderasha, and Churara. "
Roma world - - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 97. "Today there are Gypsies in practically ever European country. They are also well established in North Africa, the Near East, South America, the United States, and Canada. "
Roma world 10,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 316, 318. "Roma: Location: Dispersed population in Europe; parts of Asia, North, Central and South America, Australia, New Zealand, North & Central Africa, the Middle East, and elsewhere; Population: 6 - 10 million (estimate); Religion: An underlay of Hinduism with an overlay of either Christianity or Islam (host country religion) "; "Roma religious beliefs are rooted in Hinduism. Roma believe in a universal balance, called kuntari... Despite a 1,000-year separation from India, Roma still practice shaktism, the worship of a god through his female consort... "
Roma Yugoslavia - - - - 1362 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 114. "...the first definite record of Gpysies on the territory of modern Yugoslavia is a legal document from Ragusa in 1362, referring to a petition by two 'Egyptians' (i.e. Gypsies) called 'Vlach' and 'Vitanus'. "
Roma Yugoslavia 40,000 - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 98. "Actually, there have always been a fair number of sedentary Gypsies, or Sinte. Lockwood reports that in Yugoslavia there is currently a community of some 40,000 Gypsies. "
Roma - Churara USA - - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 102. "Customs and practices that apply to one group might or might not apply to the others. (Actually, the Kalderasha and the Machwaya are by far the most numerous of the natsiyi in the United States... Little is known about the Churara, and there are relatively few Lowara in this country. "
Roma - Gitanos Europe - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1195. "There are four main groups of gypsies in Europe:... the Gitanos, centred in the Iberian peninsula, North Afria and the south of France... "
Roma - Kalderasha Europe - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1195. "There are four main groups of gypsies in Europe: the Kalderash, mainly coppersmiths and tinsmiths based in eastern and central Europe... "
Roma - Kalderasha Spain - - - - 1975 Keefe, Eugene K., et al. Area Handbook for Spain (1st Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975); pg. 115. "Spanish Gypsies may be divided into two main groups: gitanos and hungaros (Hungarians)... Hungaros, also known as zingaros, are Kalderash, one of the four rather arbitrarily named divisions of European Gypsies to be found largely in Central Europe. It is thought that the Spanish hungaros entered Spain in comparatively recent times from France, Russia, and Greece, where they practiced their traditional tinker trades, which some continue in present-day Spain... They are found in various parts of Spain, generally in tents or shacks on the outskirts of towns. "
Roma - Kalderasha USA - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1195. "Most American gypsies are of Kalderash or Sinto [a.k.a. Manush] families. "
Roma - Kalderasha USA - - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 102. "Customs and practices that apply to one group might or might not apply to the others. (Actually, the Kalderasha and the Machwaya are by far the most numerous of the natsiyi in the United States... Little is known about the Churara, and there are relatively few Lowara in this country. "
Roma - Lowara USA - - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 102. "Customs and practices that apply to one group might or might not apply to the others. (Actually, the Kalderasha and the Machwaya are by far the most numerous of the natsiyi in the United States... Little is known about the Churara, and there are relatively few Lowara in this country. " [NOTE that Lowara are quite distinct from Furiians.]
Roma - Machwaya USA - - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 102. "Customs and practices that apply to one group might or might not apply to the others. (Actually, the Kalderasha and the Machwaya are by far the most numerous of the natsiyi in the United States... Little is known about the Churara, and there are relatively few Lowara in this country. "
Roma - Sinti Europe - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1195. "There are four main groups of gypsies in Europe:... the Manush or Sinti in France, Germany and northern Italy... "
Roma - Sinti USA - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1195. "Most American gypsies are of Kalderash or Sinto [a.k.a. Manush] families. "
Romanian Apostolic Pentecostal Church of God California 50 - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Holiness Pentecostals; pg. 242. -
Romanian Orthodox Australia 1,056 0.01% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census.
Romanian Orthodox Moldova - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 251, 253. "Location: Moldova; Population4.4 million [total population of country; 65% are ethnic Moldovans] "; "Because of the influence of Romanian culture, most Moldovans (98%) associate with the Orthodox Church, although there are also some Uniates. Before the Soviet era, most ethnic Romanians in Moldova belonged to the Romanian Orthodox Church, but the Russian Orthodox Church maintains jurisdiction over the area today. "
Romanian Orthodox New York: Buffalo 300 - 1
unit
- 1926 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997). [Orig. source: 1926 U.S. govt. census from Bureau of the Census, 1930, vol. 1]; pg. 8. "Table 31. Number of churches, membership [incl. children]... 1926 "; Reports prepared by pastors/boards of elders. Listed in table as Roumanian Orthodox Church.
Romanian Orthodox Romania - 80.00% - - 1918 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 324, 326. "When Romania finally became one unified country in 1918, over 80% of Romanians belonged to the Romanian Orthodox Church, while 10% belonged to the Greek Catholic Church (also known as the Unite Church). The rest of the population belonged to various Roman Catholic or Protestant Churches. "
Romanian Orthodox Romania 15,000,000 - 15,000
units
- 1925 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 324, 326. "Location: Romania; Population: 23 million "; "The Romanian Orthodox Patriarchate was established in 1925 with metropolitans, archbishops, and bishops to oversee the 15 million members of over 15,000 churches, served by over 18,000 priests, thus making it the second-largest Orthodox Church in the world, after the Russian Orthodox Church. "
Romanian Orthodox Romania 16,207,436 70.00% - - 1989 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies 23,153,475 [total pop.] (1989). About 70 percent Romanian Orthodox, 6 percent Uniate, 6 percent Roman Catholic, 6 percent Protestant, 12 percent unaffiliated or other.
Romanian Orthodox Romania 19,680,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Romanian Orthodox Romania 15,724,154 70.00% - - 1997 *LINK* CIA World Factbook web site (viewed Aug. 1998) Total population: 22,463,077. Romanian Orthodox 70%, Roman Catholic 6% (of which 3% are Uniate), Protestant 6%, unaffiliated 18%
Romanian Orthodox Romania - 70.00% - - 1998 *LINK* "Romanian Orthodox invite Pope to visit " on Golden Compass Religious Worldnews (July 20). [Orig. source: Catholic World News] Nearly 70 percent of the Romanian population is Orthodox, while about 12 percent is Catholic.
Romanian Orthodox USA 50,000 - - - 1957 Spence, Hartzell. The Story of America's Religions; New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1960) [1st printing 1957]; pg. 117. "Orthodoxy in America today is divided into 23 dif. groups... The others range from 200,000 of serbian extraction, 130,000 Ukrainians, 100,000 Carpatho-Russians, 80,000 Syrians and 50,000 Rumanians, to a small group of Estonians and Latvians. "
Romanian Orthodox USA 50,000 - - - 1963 Rosten, Leo (ed.). Religions in America; New York: Simon & Schuster (1963), 8th ed. [1st pub. in 1952. 8th ed. completely revised]; pg. 94. "Other Orthodox bodies include the Serbian (200,000), Ukrainian (130,000), Carpatho-Russian (100,000), Syrian (80,000), Rumanian (50,000), and smaller branches of national extractions including the Bularian, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian and others. "
Romanian Orthodox world 14,000,000 - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973); pg. 14. "The Orthodox Church embraces the four ancient patriarchates of Constantinople (100,000), Alexandria (200,000), Antioch (300,000), and Jerusalem (35,000); the churches of... Rumania (14,000,000)... "
Romanian Orthodox world 17,000,000 - - - 1984 Walls, Andrew. "Christianity " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st published in 1984]; pg. 99. "Figure 2.6: Eastern Christianity today: the Orthodox Church " [autocephalous churches in communion with Constantinople]
Romanian Orthodox world 19,600,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* Doogue, Edmund (Ecumenical News International). "German Churches Contribute Much More to WCC than Others " in Presbyterian News Service, 27 Sept. 1996 (viewed online 11 March 1999). "Those of the WCC's biggest member churches that in 1995 did not pay their membership contribution, or paid only a fraction of what they were supposed to, include... the Romanian Orthodox Church (19.6 million)... "
Romanian Orthodox world 17,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* OPPOSING VIEW (anti-) web page: "Orthodox " (viewed 26 Feb. 1999) "Autocephalus Churches: Russia (88 mill.), Romania (17 mill.), Greece (8 mill.), Servia (7 mill.), Bulgaria (6 Mill.), Georgia (1 mill.), Poland (0.6 mill.), Cyprus (0.5 mill.), Czechoislovakia (0.2 mill.), Albania, Sinai (0.1 mill.).... "
Romanian Orthodox world - except Romania - - 250
units
- 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 324, 326. "There are about 250 Romanian Orthodox churches (with about as many priests) outside Romania proper in adjacent countries, as well as in Western Europe, the United States, and Canada. "
Romanian Orthodox Church in America Canada - - 19
units
- 1971 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 68. -
Romanian Orthodox Church in America Canada 12,835 - 13
units
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 131-132. "Membership: In 1980 the Church had 13 parishes and 12,835 members in the U.S... "
Romanian Orthodox Church in America Canada - - 19
units
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 131-132. "Membership: In 1980 the Church had 13 parishes and 12,835 members in the U.S., with 19 additional parishes in Canada... "
Romanian Orthodox Church in America North America - - 32
units
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 131-132. "Membership: In 1980 the Church had 13 parishes and 12,835 members in the U.S., with 19 additional parishes in Canada and one in Venezuela. "
Romanian Orthodox Church in America USA - - 11
units
- 1971 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 68. -
Romanian Orthodox Church in America Venezuela - - 1
unit
- 1971 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 68. -
Romanian Orthodox Church in America Venezuela - - 1
unit
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 131-132. "Membership: In 1980 the Church had 13 parishes and 12,835 members in the U.S., with 19 additional parishes in Canada and one in Venezuela. "
Romanian Orthodox Church in America world - - 31
units
3
countries
1971 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 68. -
Romanian Orthodox Church in America world - - 33
units
3
countries
1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 131-132. "The Romanian Orthodox Church in America, officially known as the Romanian Orthodox Missionary Archdiocese in America and Canada... Membership: In 1980 the Church had 13 parishes and 12,835 members in the U.S., with 19 additional parishes in Canada and one in Venezuela. "
Romanian Orthodox Episcopate of America Arizona - - 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Romanian Orthodox Episcopate of America.']


Romanian Orthodox Episcopate of America, continued

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