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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

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Rinzai, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Rinzai Japan 2,530,000 - 5,979
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 104. "The Japanese Obaku Sect, founded by Ingen in 1654, has 587 temples and 120,000 adherents, while Soto has 14,257 and 6,848,000 and Rinzai has 5,979 and 2,530,000 respectively. "
Rinzai Japan 2,350,000 - - - 1956 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969), pg. 275. [Orig. source: Morgan, Kenneth W. (ed.), The Path of the Buddha; New York: The Ronald Press Co. (1956), pg. 339.]; pg. 275. "Zen was imported into Japan... by Eisai... founder of Rinzai sect; in 1244 by Dogen, who founded Soto; and in 1654 by Ingen, founder of the obaku school of Zen. Today the Rinzai sect claims 2,350,000 adherents, Soto 6,750,000, and Obaku about 100,000. "
Rinzai Japan - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 290. "Rinzai school - one of the most important schools of Ch'an (Zen). It originated with the great Chinese Ch'an master Lin-chi I-hsuan (Jap., Rinzai Gigen) and was one of the goke-shichishu. At the beginning of the 11th century the Rinzai school split into two lineages, the Rinzai Yogi lineage and the Rinzai Oryo lineage. The Rinzai school is one of the two schools of Zen still active in Japan. "
Rissho Koseikai Japan 5,081,286 4.41% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Buddhist new religion (year of origin: 1938).
Rissho Koseikai Japan - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 537. "Offshoots of Nichiren Buddhism total nineteen, including the popular 'new religions' such as Reiyukai, Rissho Koseikai, and Myochikai Kyodan. "
Rissho Koseikai Japan - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 537. "Offshoots of Nichiren Buddhism total nineteen, including the popular 'new religions' such as Reiyukai, Rissho Koseikai, and Myochikai Kyodan. "
Rissho Koseikai Japan - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 291. "Rissho Koseikai - Jap., lit. 'Society for the Establishment of Justice and Community for the Rise [of Buddha]'; a modern Buddhist folk movement of Japan, which is based on the teachings of Nichiren. It was founded in 1938 by Niwano Nikkyo (b. 1906) and Naganuma Myoko (1889-1957)... administers organizations for social assistance and education and has its own publishing facilities and journals. "
Rissho Koseikai Japan - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "Several Buddhist lay movements are offshoots of the branch of Japanese Buddhism founded by Nichiren (1222-1282) and rely upon the Lotus Sutra as their scripture. These include Rissh-o K-osei Kai, whose leader, Nikky-o Niwano, has been much involved in international peace movements... "
Rissho Koseikai world 2,000,000 - - - 1965 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1497. "One of the rapidly growing offshoots of Reiyuka is Rissho Koseikai, the Society for Righteousness and Friendship. It began in 1938 when Niwano Nikkyo... In the mid-1960s it claimed some two million adherents. "
Rissho Koseikai world 4,848,476 - - - 1975 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 609-623. "Perhaps these characteristics explain why Rissho Koseikai was the fastest growing 'new religion' [in Japan] from the end of World War II until 1950. Membership in 1975 was 4,848,476. "; pg. 624: "...headquarters... are located in Nakano Ward, Tokyo, where a number of pink buildings surround the Great Sacred Hall (completed in March, 1964), and facilities include school buildings from kindergarten through high school and a well-equipped modern hospital. "
Rissho Koseikai world 5,000,000 - - - 1993 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 206. "The sect has an estimated five million members... " [Listed here as "Rissho Kosei Kai "]
Ritsu China - - - - 667 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 209. "Lu-tsung - Chin., roughly 'school of discipline'; school of Chinese Buddhism originated by Tao-hsuan (596-667)... Although the school is of Hinayana origin, it was also regarded as authoritative by the Mahayana schools of China. The teachings of this school were brought to Japan in 745 by Chien-chen (Ritsu school). "
Ritsu Japan - - - - 745 C.E. Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 209. "Lu-tsung - Chin., roughly 'school of discipline'; school of Chinese Buddhism originated by Tao-hsuan (596-667)... Although the school is of Hinayana origin, it was also regarded as authoritative by the Mahayana schools of China. The teachings of this school were brought to Japan in 745 by Chien-chen (Ritsu school). "
Ritsu Japan - - - - 784 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 524. "The six Nara Buddhist schools. Six scholarly disciplines were pursuied by a small number of monks at designated home temples in Nara. They were extensions of Chinese scholarship... Kusha... Jojitsu... Sanron... Hosso... Kegon... Ritsu (Chin.: Lu; Skt. Vinaya) School. Dedicated to the study of Hinayanist monastic precents or disciplines... "
Ritsu Japan - - - - 1282 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 538. "Nichiren Buddhism has been criticized as... intolerant... Nichiren condemned other sects in the stinging phrase: Nembutsu mugen, Zen tenma, Shingon bokoku, Ritsu kokuzoku (the Nembutsu--Amida Buddhism--is hell; Zen is a devil; Shingon is the nation's ruin; and Ritsu is treason).' "
Ritsu Japan - - - - 1290 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 609-624. "Ritsu (Jap.; lit. 'discipline'; translation of the Skt. vinaya). One of the schools of Nara Buddhism. A Reformed Ritsu School was founded by Eison (1201-1290) on the basis that one can informally vow to live by the Buddhist discipline. "
Ritsu Japan - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 291. "Ritsu school - Jap., lit. 'discipline school'; school of Japanese Buddhism that developed out of the original Chinese form of this school (Lu-tsung). It was brought to Japan in the year 754 by... Chien-chen... The Ritsu school survives until the present but has never been of great importance... "
Ritsu Japan - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996). Chapter: Buddhism; pg. 122. "By the Nara period (710-94), six schools had been brought over from China: Sanron and Jojitsu (both established in 624), Hosso (654), Kusha (658), Kegon (736), and Ritsu (754); Jojitsu, Kusha, and Ritsu were Hinayana, the other three Mahayana. Of the six, only Hosso, Kegon, and Ritsu have survived in modern Japan, and these have only historical significance and slight membership. "
River Brethren North America 15,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 65-66. "River Brethren... disputes... brought about the establishment of two smaller bodies [in additionto Brethren in Christ Church] -- the Old Order, or Yorker, Brethren in 1843, and the Brinsers, or United Zion's Children, in 1855. These three churches today number about 15,000 communicants in the U.S. and Canada. "
River Brethren USA 19,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance (viewed circa Nov. 1998); "last updated October 1998 " Table: "Christian Organizations "; "Membership numbers, as supplied by various denominations "
ROC world 3 - - - 1998 *LINK* official web site (1 Jan. 1999); web page: "The Temple " Pagan:
"We know of three ROC (ourselves) but we figure that they're 53 of us. This is because I had a dream with a small disc that was labeled 3:11, we think that ROC travel in groups of three. So they're 14 groups of three and one of eleven. "
Rock Church Virginia 2,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Virginia Beach, Virginia; pastor Gimenez.
Rocky Mountain Yearly Meeting USA 1,394 - 23
units
1
country
1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Quakers (Friends); pg. 324. "Rocky Mountain Yearly Meeting... Colorado Springs, CO... was established in 1957 by separation from the Nebraska yearly meeting and did not continue the latter's affiliation with the Friends United Meeting. Worship is programmed. Mission work is carried on among the Navajo Indians at the Rough Rock Friends Mission near Chinle, Arizona. Ouaker [sic? Quaker?] Ridge Camp is maintained north of Woodland Park, Colorado. Membership: In 1987 the Meeting reported 1,394 members in 23 congregations in Colorado, New Mexico, Nebraska, and South Dakota. These include five Navajo churches in the Rough Rock area. "
Rogerenes California - - 1
unit
- 1945 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 324. "The Rogerines... By the 1940s only a small group was left in Mystic [Connecticut] and a smaller group in California. "
Rogerenes Connecticut - - 1
unit
1
country
1677 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Quakers (Friends); pg. 324. "The Rogerenes were a small religious group which began as Baptists but were strongly influenced by members of the Society of Friends. They were originally led by John Rogers (1648?-1721)... [of] New London, Connecticut... John Rogers became the pastor... As Rogers ideas became more radical, the congregation also broke its ties to the Baptists in Newport around 1677... "
Rogerenes Connecticut - - - - 1745 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 324. "Rogerenes... During the 1740s, land was purchased near Groton and Mystic, Connecticut, and over a generation the group migrated eastward. Its prosperity in site of difficulties during the Revolution and the War of 1812 is shown by the erection of a new large meetinghouse in 1815 and an even larger one in the post-Civil War era. "
Rogerenes Connecticut - - 1
unit
- 1945 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 324. "The Rogerines... By the 1940s only a small group was left in Mystic [Connecticut] and a smaller group in California. "
Rogerenes New Jesey - - - - 1735 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 324. "In 1735 a group of Rogerenes moved to Morris County, New Jersey, and established a colony. Three years later they moved to Monmouth County, New Jersey neaer present-day Ocean City. The settlement died out by the end of the century. "
Rogerenes USA - - 2
units
1
country
1945 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 324. "The Rogerines... By the 1940s only a small group was left in Mystic [Connecticut] and a smaller group in California. "
Rogerenes USA - 0.00% - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 324. "The Rogerines
(Defunct)
... The twentieth century saw the decline of the church. Some familes had moved wets before the turn of the century,and others drifted to other churches. By the 1940s only a small group was left in Mystic and a smaller group in California. A generation later, while some descendents of former Rogerene families still identified themselves with the group, it seems to have ceased to exist as a church body. "
Rohingyas Bangladesh 200,000 - - - 1977 *LINK* website: Free Rohingya Campaign (home page) (viewed 17 April 2005) "In the past three decades, there have been significant migrations, forced and voluntary, of Rohingyas to neighboring Bangladesh. In 1977, in response to the military government's attempt to identify illegal immigrants, some 200,000 group members sought refuge in Bangladesh. "
Rohingyas Bangladesh 200,000 - - - 1978 *LINK* website: Free Rohingya Campaign (home page) (viewed 17 April 2005) "In 1978 over 200,000 Rohingyas fled to Bangladesh, following the 'Nagamin' ('Dragon King') operation of the Myanmar army. Officially this campaign aimed at 'scrutinising each individual living in the state, designating citizens and foreigners in accordance with the law and taking actions against foreigners who have filtered into the country illegally'. (13) This military campaign directly targeted civilians, and resulted in widespread killings, rape and destruction of mosques and further religious persecution. (14) "

Sources: (13) Burma: The Rohingya Muslims; Ending a Cycle of Exodus?, Human Rights Watch/Asia, New York, September 1996, p.10.

(14) See: Union of Myanmar (Burma): Human Rights Abuses against Muslims in the Rakhine (Arakan) State, Amnesty International, May 1992, ASA 16/06/02.

Rohingyas Bangladesh 250,000 - - - 1992 *LINK* website: Free Rohingya Campaign (home page) (viewed 17 April 2005) "In the past three decades, there have been significant migrations, forced and voluntary, of Rohingyas to neighboring Bangladesh. In 1977, in response to the military government's attempt to identify illegal immigrants, some 200,000 group members sought refuge in Bangladesh. While most of them subsequently returned, in 1981-82 there was another exodus as Rangoon implemented a new citizenship law that required residents to prove that they have lived in the country since 1824. In the mid to late 1990s, further migrations to Bangladesh occurred, many of which were reportedly due to forcible expulsions by state authorities. From a high of 250,000 Rohingyas in Bangladeshi refugee camps in the early 1990s, there were some 20,000 left by the end of 2000 after the rest had returned to Burma. The UN High Commissioner for Refugees has financially supported the camps. "
Rohingyas Bangladesh 20,000 - - - 2000 *LINK* website: Free Rohingya Campaign (home page) (viewed 17 April 2005) "From a high of 250,000 Rohingyas in Bangladeshi refugee camps in the early 1990s, there were some 20,000 left by the end of 2000 after the rest had returned to Burma. "
Rohingyas Bangladesh 121,902 - - - 2003 *LINK* website: "Burma Issues; webpage: Rohingya (viewed 17 April 2005). Written by Karen Pillar "The largest Rohingya exoduses from Burma occurred in 1972 and 1991/1992 when large numbers fled to Bangladesh, although outside of these times there has still been a steady flow of Rohingya out of Burma. Refugees International estimated that as at March 2003 there were 100,000 Rohingyas living illegally in Bangladesh. (1) These individuals are in addition to the 21,902 individuals from Nothern Rakhine State living in the two UNHCR refugee camps in the Cox's Bazaar region of Bangladesh. (2) " Sources: (1) Forgotten People: The Rohingya of Burma, Refugees International, 15 March 2003. (2) UNHCR Country Operations Plan 2004, Bangladesh.
Rohingyas Bangladesh 20,000 - - - 2004 *LINK* website: Free Rohingya Campaign (home page) (viewed 17 April 2005) "The mass repatriation of Rohingyas to Myanmar by UNHCR took place from April 1994 to December 1995. Since that time repatriation has slowed down. To date a total of 236,000 Rohingyas have returned to Rakhine State from Bangladesh. At the beginning of 2004 almost 20,000 Rohingyas were still in Kutapalong and Nayapara, the two remaining refugee camps in Cox¹s Bazaar, southern Bangladesh. Seven thousand of these 20,000 people have been cleared by Myanmar authorities for return. During 2003 some 3,000 Rohingyas were repatriated to Myanmar amid reports of the Bangladesh authorities coercing some of them to return. "
Rohingyas Bangladesh 600,000 - - - 2005 *LINK* website: Arakan Rohingya National Organisation; webpage: "Rohingya Summary ": "Facts About the Rohingya Muslims of Arakan, " article by Nurul Islam, president of Arakan Rohingya National Organisation (ARNO) (viewed 17 April 2005). "Due to large scale persecution through ethnic cleansing and genocidal action against them, about 1.5 million Rohingyas are forced to leave their hearth and home since Burmese independence in 1948. This unfortunate uprooted people are mostly found in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia; also in UAE, Thailand and Malaysia. Present distribution of the Rohingya population is given below:... Bangladesh: 600,000... Approximation "
Rohingyas Malaysia - - - - 2005 *LINK* website: Arakan Rohingya National Organisation; webpage: "Rohingya Summary ": "Facts About the Rohingya Muslims of Arakan, " article by Nurul Islam, president of Arakan Rohingya National Organisation (ARNO) (viewed 17 April 2005). "Due to large scale persecution through ethnic cleansing and genocidal action against them, about 1.5 million Rohingyas are forced to leave their hearth and home since Burmese independence in 1948. This unfortunate uprooted people are mostly found in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia; also in UAE, Thailand and Malaysia. Present distribution of the Rohingya population is given below:... Others (U.A.E., Thailand, Malaysia.) : 100,000... Approximation "
Rohingyas Myanmar - - - - 650 C.E. *LINK* website: Arakan Rohingya National Organisation; webpage: "Rohingya Summary ": "Facts About the Rohingya Muslims of Arakan, " article by Nurul Islam, president of Arakan Rohingya National Organisation (ARNO) (viewed 17 April 2005). "Arakan, formerly called Rohang, lies on the north­western part of Burma with 360 miles coastal belt from the Bay of Bengal. It borders 167 miles with Bangladesh both by land and sea. Rohingyas have been living in Arakan from time immemorial. They are a people with distinct culture and civilization of their own. They trace their ancestry to Arabs, Moors, Pathans, Moghuls, Bengalis and some Indo-Mongoloid people. Early Muslim settlements in Arakan date back to 7th century AD. "
Rohingyas Myanmar 1,400,000 3.11% - - 1996 *LINK* Website: New Internationalist Magazine; webpage: "A Kaleidoscope of peoples " (viewed 17 April 2005). New Internationalist Magazine, Issue 280. Copyright: New Internationalist 1996 "Burma... population of around 45 million...

Ethnic nationality: Rohingya
Population: 1.4 million

The state of Arakan along Burma¹s coast is partly inhabited by the Rohingya, a distinct cultural group of Muslims descended from Arab, Moorish, Mughal and Bengali merchants who arrived after the seventh century. Rohingya predominate in the far north of Arakan State, mainly inhabited by the Buddhist Rakhine who are of Tibeto-Burman stock. There have been centuries of tension between the two groups. The Rohingya were ignored by the Burmans during the independence struggle and sided with the British. "

Rohingyas Myanmar - - - - 2005 *LINK* website: "Burma Issues; webpage: Rohingya (viewed 17 April 2005). Written by Karen Pillar [Source: Source: Amnesty International Report: The Rohingya Minority, Amnesty International, 2004] "The Rohingyas are a Muslim ethnic minority group who are concentrated in the northern part of Rakhine State. This is a geographically isolated area in western Burma, bordering Bangladesh. The Rohingya population is mostly concentrated in three northern townships of Rakhine State: Maungdaw, Buthidaung and Rathedaung. Whilst it is difficult to determine the exact number of Rohingyas living in Rakhine State, it estimated that of the approximately three million people living in Rakhine State, between 700,000 and 1.5 million of them are Muslims, the vast majority of which are Rohingyas from northern Rakhine State. Ethnically, the Rohingyas are genetically related to the Bengalis, Indians, Arabs and Moors, with early Muslim settlements in Rakhine State dating back to 7th century A.D. "
Rohingyas Myanmar 2,000,000 4.00% - - 2005 *LINK* website: Arakan Rohingya National Organisation; webpage: "Rohingya Summary ": "Facts About the Rohingya Muslims of Arakan, " article by Nurul Islam, president of Arakan Rohingya National Organisation (ARNO) (viewed 17 April 2005). "Burma is a home to numours [sic] ethnic groups and about 60% of the area is inhabited by nearly 140 ethnic races and Rohingya is one of them. Burma has a population of about 50 million of which nearly 8 millions are Muslims. Of the Muslim population about 3.5 millions (both at home and at the places of refuge [in other countries]) are Rohingyas of Arakan. The Rohingyas are a majority community in Arakan. Due to large scale persecution through ethnic cleansing and genocidal action against them, about 1.5 million Rohingyas are forced to leave their hearth and home since Burmese independence in 1948. This unfortunate uprooted people are mostly found in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia; also in UAE, Thailand and Malaysia. Present distribution of the Rohingya population is given below:
Inside Burma: 2 million*... Approximation "
Rohingyas Myanmar - - - - 2005 *LINK* website: Free Rohingya Campaign (home page) (viewed 17 April 2005) "The vast majority of Rohingyas live in the Rakhine State, a geographically isolated area in western Myanmar, consisting of coastal plains; a network of streams and rivers; and a mountain range separating it from central Myanmar. The Naaf River marks part of the border between Bangladesh and Myanmar. The Rakhine State (historically known as Arakan), is one of seven ethnic minority states which were formed under the constitution of 1974. The Rohingya population is mostly concentrated in the three northern townships: Maungdaw, Buthidaung and Rathedaung. The Rohingyas speak a Bengali dialect similar to what is spoken in the Chittagong region of Bangladesh, mixed primarily with words from the Urdu, Hindi and Arabic languages, but also from the Bama and English languages. "
Rohingyas Myanmar - - - - 2005 *LINK* website: Free Rohingya Campaign (home page) (viewed 17 April 2005) "The vast majority of Rohingyas are not believed to possess Myanmar citizenship. Moreover they are not recognised as one of the 135 'national races' by the Myanmar government: 'In actual fact, although there are (135) national races living in Myanmar today, the so-called Rohingya people is not one of them. Historically, there has never been a 'Rohingya' race in Myanmar. The very name Rohingya is a creation of a group of insurgents in the Rakhine State. Since the First Anglo-Myanmar War in 1824, people of Muslim Faith from the adjacent country illegally entered Myanmar Ngain-Ngan, particularly Rakhine State. Being illegal immigrants they do not hold immigration papers like other nationals of the country.'... In the official records, they are listed as a Bengali racial group of the Bengali race and are recognized as permanent residents within Myanmar. However in practice the rights of the Rohingya population of northern Rakhine State are greatly restricted. "
Rohingyas Pakistan 350,000 - - - 2005 *LINK* website: Arakan Rohingya National Organisation; webpage: "Rohingya Summary ": "Facts About the Rohingya Muslims of Arakan, " article by Nurul Islam, president of Arakan Rohingya National Organisation (ARNO) (viewed 17 April 2005). "Due to large scale persecution through ethnic cleansing and genocidal action against them, about 1.5 million Rohingyas are forced to leave their hearth and home since Burmese independence in 1948. This unfortunate uprooted people are mostly found in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia; also in UAE, Thailand and Malaysia. Present distribution of the Rohingya population is given below:... Pakistan: 350,000... Approximation "
Rohingyas Saudi Arabia 400,000 - - - 2005 *LINK* website: Arakan Rohingya National Organisation; webpage: "Rohingya Summary ": "Facts About the Rohingya Muslims of Arakan, " article by Nurul Islam, president of Arakan Rohingya National Organisation (ARNO) (viewed 17 April 2005). "Due to large scale persecution through ethnic cleansing and genocidal action against them, about 1.5 million Rohingyas are forced to leave their hearth and home since Burmese independence in 1948. This unfortunate uprooted people are mostly found in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia; also in UAE, Thailand and Malaysia. Present distribution of the Rohingya population is given below:... Saudi Arabia 400,000... Approximation "
Rohingyas Thailand - - - - 2005 *LINK* website: Arakan Rohingya National Organisation; webpage: "Rohingya Summary ": "Facts About the Rohingya Muslims of Arakan, " article by Nurul Islam, president of Arakan Rohingya National Organisation (ARNO) (viewed 17 April 2005). "Due to large scale persecution through ethnic cleansing and genocidal action against them, about 1.5 million Rohingyas are forced to leave their hearth and home since Burmese independence in 1948. This unfortunate uprooted people are mostly found in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia; also in UAE, Thailand and Malaysia. Present distribution of the Rohingya population is given below:... Others (U.A.E., Thailand, Malaysia.) : 100,000... Approximation "
Rohingyas United Arab Emirates - - - - 2005 *LINK* website: Arakan Rohingya National Organisation; webpage: "Rohingya Summary ": "Facts About the Rohingya Muslims of Arakan, " article by Nurul Islam, president of Arakan Rohingya National Organisation (ARNO) (viewed 17 April 2005). "Due to large scale persecution through ethnic cleansing and genocidal action against them, about 1.5 million Rohingyas are forced to leave their hearth and home since Burmese independence in 1948. This unfortunate uprooted people are mostly found in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia; also in UAE, Thailand and Malaysia. Present distribution of the Rohingya population is given below:... Others (U.A.E., Thailand, Malaysia.) : 100,000... Approximation "
Rohingyas world - - - - 2005 *LINK* website: "Burma Issues; webpage: Rohingya (viewed 17 April 2005). Written by Karen Pillar "Nevertheless, it is estimated that since Burmese independence in 1948 approximately 1.5 million Rohingyas have left Burma and are in-exile. They mostly live in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia. A small number of Rohingyas are also located in UAE, Thailand and Malaysia. "
Rohingyas world 3,500,000 - - - 2005 *LINK* website: Arakan Rohingya National Organisation; webpage: "Rohingya Summary ": "Facts About the Rohingya Muslims of Arakan, " article by Nurul Islam, president of Arakan Rohingya National Organisation (ARNO) (viewed 17 April 2005). "Burma has a population of about 50 million... Of the Muslim population about 3.5 millions (both at home and at the places of refuge [in other countries]) are Rohingyas of Arakan... Due to large scale persecution through ethnic cleansing and genocidal action against them, about 1.5 million Rohingyas are forced to leave their hearth and home since Burmese independence in 1948. This unfortunate uprooted people are mostly found in Bangladesh, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia; also in UAE, Thailand and Malaysia. Present distribution of the Rohingya population is given below:
Inside Burma: 2 million*
Bangladesh: 600,000*
Pakistan: 350,000*
Saudi Arabia 400,000*
Others (U.A.E., Thailand, Malaysia.) : 100,000*

* Approximation "

Rolling Hills Covenant Church California 2,750 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Rolling Hills Estates, CA; pastor Byron MacDonald.
Roma Albania - - - - 1997 Wright, David K. Albania ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997); pg. 102. "...60% of the people [are] Muslims. More than 25% are Orthodox Christians, while about 15% are Roman Catholic. Such a mix, combined with a few people of Bulgarian, Greek, or Romany (formerly known as Gypsy) descent... "
Roma Bosnia 30,000 - - - 1808 Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 116. "How large the total population [of Gypsies] was in Bosnia is very unclear: Chaumette-des-Fosses estimated 30,000 in 1808, but Persusier, who was there four years later, put it at only 8000. To judge by the other statistics they gae, Pertusier was the more reliable of the two. "
Roma Bosnia 8,000 - - - 1812 Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 116. "How large the total population [of Gypsies] was in Bosnia is very unclear: Chaumette-des-Fosses estimated 30,000 in 1808, but Persusier, who was there four years later, put it at only 8000. To judge by the other statistics they gae, Pertusier was the more reliable of the two. "
Roma Bosnia - - - - 1999 Black, Eric. Bosnia: Fractured Region. Minneapolis: Lerner Publications Co. (1999); pg. 14. "Bosnia also includes a small number of Jews, Roma... and Albanians... "
Roma Bosnia and Herzegovina 9,630 - - - 1865 Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 116. "Ottoman statistics for 1865 give a total of 9630 Gypsies for Bosnia and Hercegovina... "
Roma Bosnia and Herzegovina 11,500 - - - 1868 Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 116. "...a German observer in the late 1860s estimated a total of 11,500 [Gypsies in Bosnia and Herzegovina] "
Roma Bosnia and Herzegovina 5,139 - - - 1870 Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 116. "...the 1870 census put it at only 5139 [Gypsies in Bosnia and Hercegovina], but this was a survey of households and probably missed many of the ones who were still nomadic. "
Roma Bosnia: Sarajevo 1,000 - - - 1868 Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 278. "Roskiewicz noted roughly 1000 Gypsies in Sarajevo in the 1860s (Studien uber Bosnien, pp. 179-80) "
Roma Bosnia: Travnik 300 - - - 1865 Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 116. "Efforts had been made to persuade the Gypsies to settle, and in the 19th century [endnotes mention 1860s] there were Gypsy mahalas at Sarajevo, Travnic (where Chaumette-des-Fosses noted 300 Gypsies), Banja Luka and Visoko. "
Roma Bulgaria - - - - 1378 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 114. "Gypsy villages in western Bulgaria are mentioned in a grant of land in 1378; this suggests that they had already been established for quite a long period in that area. "
Roma Bulgaria: Sliven 50,000 25.00% - - 1997 Burke, Patrick. Eastern Europe. Austin, Texas: Raintree Steck-Vaughn Publishers (1997); pg. 17. "In Sliven in Bulgaria, for instance, many of the 50,000 Gypsies who make up one-quarter of the city's population live in crowded and unsanitary conditions. It is common for three or four families to live in one home and for five or six people to sleep in the same room. "
Roma Byzantine Empire - - - - 835 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 114. "The Gypsies... Though the date of their original exodus from India is unknown, they were on byzantine territory by the year 835, and there is firm evidence that Gypsies had crossed into the European part of the Byzantine Empire by the 11th century. "
Roma California: Los Angeles 10,000 - - - 1962 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 9). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1195. "A more recent estimate, in 1962, placed nearly 5000 gypsies in New York, nearly 10,000 in Los Angeles -- cities where the gypsies tend to congregate during the winter. "
Roma California: Los Angeles 15,000 - - - 1994 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 101. "Nevertheless, the Rom were in the cities to stay, and today there are a reported 10,000 in Chicago and 15,000 in Los Angeles. "


Roma, continued

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