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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Reformiert-Apostolischer Gemeindebund / Apostolische Gemeinschaft, Germany

Reformiert-Apostolischer Gemeindebund / Apostolische Gemeinschaft, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Regular Baptist Churches, General Association of USA 22,000 - - - 1936 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 137. "...the fundamentalist General Association of Regular Baptists, which split away from the Northern Baptists in protest at the denomination's policies, numbered only 22,000 members by 1936, compared with approximately 1.3 million members in the larger denomination. "
Regular Baptist Churches, General Association of USA 160,123 - 1,532
units
- 1992 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "General Association of Regular Baptist Churches. "
Regular Baptist Churches, General Association of USA 136,380 - 1,458
units
- 1994 *LINK* web site for Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches (accessed 1998); [Orig. source: Source: Kenneth B. Bedell, editor, Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches, annual.] Table: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches: U.S. Religious Bodies with more than 60,000 Members "; "...prepared for the U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of the Census... for the 1997 edition of the Statistical Abstract of the U.S. "
Regular Baptist Churches, General Association of USA 136,380 - 1,458
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.
Regular Baptist Churches, General Association of USA 115,950 - 1,440
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as General Asn. of Regular Baptist Chrs.
Regular Baptist Churches, General Association of world 22,000 - 84
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 296. "General Association of Regular Baptist Churches in the U. S. A.: A group of Baptist churches in the North whichunited... Its theological position is fundamentalist. There are 84 churches and 22,000 members. "
Regular Baptist Churches, General Association of world 150,000 - 1,000
units
- 1979 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 273. "The General Association of Regular baptists had grown to about 1,000 churches by 1979, with aggregate membership of approximately 150,000. "
Regular Baptist Churches, General Association of world 260,000 - 1,593
units
- 1983 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1993); pg. 48. "In 1983 there were 1,593 churches in the fellowship, with 260,000 members... "
Regular Baptist Churches, General Association of world 300,000 - 1,532
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). -
Regular Baptists Maryland 319 0.01% 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members' column: 251. [Listed as 'Regular Baptists.']
Regular Baptists North Carolina 3,961 0.06% 34
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 3,321. [Listed as 'Regular Baptists.']
Regular Baptists Pennsylvania 118 0.00% 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 95. [Listed as 'Regular Baptists.']
Regular Baptists USA 4,722 - 41
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Regular Baptists.']
Regular Baptists Virginia 324 0.01% 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 271. [Listed as 'Regular Baptists.']
Regular Baptists world 17,000 - 266
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 644. "Regular Baptists:... There are 266 churches and approximately 17,000 members. "
Reinfeld Mennonitengemeinde Paraguay 64 - - - 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " PARAGUAY... Reinfeld Mennonitengemeinde; Members: 64
Reinland Mennonite Church Bolivia 160 - - - 1990 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " BOLIVIA... Reinlander Mennonitengemeinde... Members (1990): 160+/-
Reinland Mennonite Church Canada 800 - 7
units
- 1987 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 244-247. Table 1: Canadian Current Statistics. (# of adherents is from table's "inclusive membership " column, not the sometimes smaller "full communicant or confirmed members " col.) Listed in table as "Reinland Mennonite Church. "
Reinland Mennonite Church Canada 850 - 7
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "USA/Canada: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " CANADA... Reinland Mennonite Church; Members (1994): 850; Congregations: 7
Reiyukai Japan 3,000,000 - - - 1969 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969); pg. 294. "Several other less extreme offshoots of Nichiren are among the new religions. Among these are Reiyukai, or the 'Association of the Friends of the Spirit, " which claims some three million adherent... "
Reiyukai Japan 2,838,000 2.46% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Buddhist new religion (year of origin: 1923).
Reiyukai Japan - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 537. "Offshoots of Nichiren Buddhism total nineteen, including the popular 'new religions' such as Reiyukai, Rissho Koseikai, and Myochikai Kyodan. "
Reiyukai Japan - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 609-610. "Reiyukai (Japanese; lit. 'friends of the spirit association'). A movement within Nichiren Buddhism, founded in Tokyo in 1925 by Kubo Kakutaro (1890-1944)... It was perhaps the most successful new religion prior to and during World War II, when, unlike most other movements, it was free from interference by the government. However, being prone to schism prone, it has been weakened by frequent defections... Under the presidency of the founder's son, Kubo Tsuginari... Reiyukai has been modernized and regenerated, with an influx of young people. A training center has been built on the Izu Peninsula. A sophisticated periodical, Inner Trip, attracts a wide leadership. The headquarters are in Tokyo. "
Reiyukai world 4,000,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1497. "Reiyuka (the Association of Friends of the Spirit) came into being when a worker in Yokohama... in 1925... the movement has been highly schismatic. Nonetheless it claims about four million members. "
Reiyukai world 2,000,000 - - - 1993 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 207. "Reiyukai, with its estimated two million followers... "
Reiyukai world 3,000,000 - - - 1993 Rausch, David A. & Carl Hermann Voss. World Religions: Our Quest for Meaning; Trinity Press International: Valley Forge, PA (1993); pg. 112. "Reiyukai Kyodan, the Association of Friends of the Spirits... founded after World War I by Kotani Kimi... is one of the largest new religions with approximately 3 million adherents. "
Relief Church world - - 100
units
- 1847 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 646. "Relief Church: A small denomination of little more than 100 congregations, which separated from the Church of Scotland, in 1762... In 1847, it united with the Secession Church to form the United Presbyterian Church. "
religious Australia - 76.60% - - 1991 *LINK* Anglican Communion News Service (ACNS). "Australia: Statistics Show Australians Religious Affiliation " in ACNS #1315, 3 Sept. 1997 [97.8.5.2] (viewed online 24 June 1999). "According to figures recently released by the Australian government's Bureau of Statistics... of Australia's nearly 18 million people... statistics... from the nation's latest census in 1996 [which] includes the question: 'What is your religion?'... The figures from the latest census show a slight decline in religious identification from the figure of 76.6% in 1991; 16.5% now claim to have 'no religion', but only 0.04% describe themselves as 'atheists'. "
religious Australia 13,284,000 73.80% - - 1996 *LINK* Anglican Communion News Service (ACNS). "Australia: Statistics Show Australians Religious Affiliation " in ACNS #1315, 3 Sept. 1997 [97.8.5.2] (viewed online 24 June 1999). "According to figures recently released by the Australian government's Bureau of Statistics, 73.8% of Australia's nearly 18 million people identify with some religious group, and 70% identify with a Christian group. The statistics are the result of the government's analysis of information from the nation's latest census in 1996. A census is taken every five years, and includes the question: 'What is your religion?' "
religious Bosnia - 17.00% - - 1985 Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 222. "One survey in 1985 put the proportion of religious believers in Bosnia at 17 per cent. "
religious China 100,000,000 8.30% - - 1996 Stefoff, Rebecca. China (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 8-9. "Population: 1,210,000,000 (1996)... Religions: Approximately 8.3% of the population (100 million) follow Taoism, Buddhism, Islam, Confucianism, and Protestantism. "
religious Cuba - 51.00% - - 1997 Baker, Christopher P. Cuba Handbook. Chico, California: Moon Publications, Inc. (1997); pg. 103. "Cuba is officially an atheist country, and proselytizing is illega. Nonetheless, a recent government survey found that more than half of all Cubans are creyentos, beleivers of one sort or another. "
religious Czech Republic - 43.90% - - 1998 *LINK* official government info web site Percent of population who describe themselves as "religious ": 43.9%
religious India - - - - 1999 Gallagher, Winifred. Working on God. New York: Random House (1999); pg. 16. "As the millennium approaches, the experiential, individualistic thread remarked so long ago by Emerson runs brightly through America's religious fabric. Among nations, only India is demonstrably more spiritual. Ninety-five percent of Americans say they believe in God. "
religious Ireland - - - - 1993 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 284. "The Catholic sociologist Andrew Greeley declared in 1993, 'In some countries, most notably Ireland and the United States, religious devotion may be higher than it has ever been in human history.' "
religious Japan 38,698,500 33.60% - - 1979 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991) [reprint; 1st pub. 1984]; pg. 379. "Another survey, conducted in 1979, asked people if they professed any religious faith. Affirmative replies [were] to 33.6%. " Most who said yes identified their faith as Buddhist (78.4%). Only 3.3% identified their faith as Shinto.
religious Tennessee: Nashville - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Shirley Zeitlen and Company Realtors "; web page: "Religion " [in Nashville, Tenn.] (viewed 15 June 1999). "65% of people in Davidson County [in Tennessee, where Nashville is] describe themselves as religiously affiliated (the national average is 55%)... Nashville has one of the highest number of churches per capita of any city in the U.S., and is headquarters to a great number of national church offices, including Southern Baptist Convention, United Methodist Church, and AME. Nashville is home to the largest religious publishing industry in the nation; local publishers include Thomas Nelson Publishers, the largest Bible producer in the world. "
religious Ukraine - - - - 1997 Bassis, Volodymyr. Ukraine (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1997); pg. 77. "Though Ukraine still has a long way to go to re-establish pre-revolutionary conditions, the liberation of religion in Ukraine has attracted numerous preachers, missionaries... For the younger generation the return to religion has become a popular trend. What was once considered old fashioned behavior and disapproved of by the Communist youth, is today not only condoned, it has been taken up by droves of young Ukrainians. "
religious USA - 70.00% - - 1993 Reeves, Thomas C. The Empty Church: Does Organized Religion Matter Anymore? Simon & Schuster: New York, NY (1998); pg. 64. "An in-depth random survey of 4,001 Americans... [1993] concluded that 30% of Americans are totally secular in outlook, 29% are barely or nominally religious, 22% modestly religious, and only 19% -- about 36 million -- regularly practice their religion. "
religious USA - - - - 1993 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 284. "The Catholic sociologist Andrew Greeley declared in 1993, 'In some countries, most notably Ireland and the United States, religious devotion may be higher than it has ever been in human history.' And yet American had a particular kind of religiosity by the 1990s. There was a fierce independence; polls showed that for most Americans religious authority resided in the believer, rather than in the churchor the Bible. And there was a vast ignorance of the faith. Gallup referred to 'a nation of biblical illiterates' and presented solid evidence... This resulted in what has been called 'Consumer Christianity,' a religion based on selective teachings of the historic faith that ws highly permissive, self-centered, and indistinct... It is difficult to say now much of this came from individual Americans themselves and how much was absorbed from the very secular leadership of the media, education, and the legal profession. "
religious USA - - - - 1993 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 284. "[During the 1990s] American newspapers and movies virtually ignored religion and churches, while on television and on stage they were sometimes mocked. (A flurry of interest in angels in the late 1990s had more to do with entertainment than anything else.) Nonreligious and state schools at all levels shunned even history. Religion and morality were often treated in the classroom and on the screen as two separate topics. The courts, in the name of the separation of church and state, were a major force in restricting the impact of the Christian faith. Among other things, they outlawed prayer in the public schools and drove Christian symbols out of public places. "
religious USA - 54.00% - - 2000 *LINK* Holmes, Cecile S (RNS). "Seeking Spirituality, Americans Are Picking and Choosing Their Religion " in Salt Lake Tribune (12 Feb 2000) "'A recent poll we did showed 54 percent of Americans say they are religious, 30 percent spiritual and 6 percent both,' Gallup said. "
religious world - - - - 1993 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 284. "The Catholic sociologist Andrew Greeley declared in 1993, 'In some countries, most notably Ireland and the United States, religious devotion may be higher than it has ever been in human history.' "
religious world - - - - 2005 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "Is worldwide atheism growing or in decline? This is a difficult question to answer simply. On the one hand, there are more atheists in the world today than ever before. Additionally, the nations with some of the highest degrees of organic atheism (such as Great Britain, France, and Scandinavia) have been experiencing a steady increase of atheism over the past century, an increase which shows no indication of abating (Bruce, 2001). On the other hand, worldwide atheism overall may be in decline. This is due to the demographic fact that highly religious nations have the highest birthrates in the world, and highly irreligious nations have the lowest birthrates in the world. As Norris and Inglehart [Norris, Pippa and Ronald Inglehart. 2004. Sacred and Secular: Religion and Politics Worldwide. Cambridge U. Press] observe, 'the world as a whole now has more people with traditional religious views than ever before - and they constitute a growing proportion of the world's population.' "
religious world - - - - 2005 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "In sum, loss of belief in God has occurred over the course of the 20th century in Canada, Australia, and various European countries (Davie, 2000), including Germany (Shand, 1998; Greeley, 2003), the United Kingdom (Bruce, 2001, 2002), the Netherlands (Grontenhuis and Scheepers, 2001), and Scandinavia (Bruce, 1999). However, secularization is quite limited to specific advanced industrialized nations (with relatively low birth rates), and has not occurred throughout much of the rest of the world. Secularization is thus very limited in scope, for as Peter Berger (2001) observes, 'most of the world is bubbling with religious passions.' "
religious Yugoslavia - 41.00% - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "Yugoslavia.com "; web page: "Population: Religion " (viewed 30 Jan. 1999). [Orig. source: Source: Federal Buerau of Statistics, 1991., Veroispovest, volum 2 - 1993.] Graphic: "Religious self-evaluation of Yugoslav citizens "; "Non-religious " 32%; "Religious " 41%; "Undecided " 26%; "Against religion " 1%; These results are in response to a question of how religious people consider themselves, which is different than asking people their preferred religion.
religious - active USA 36,000,000 19.00% - - 1993 Reeves, Thomas C. The Empty Church: Does Organized Religion Matter Anymore? Simon & Schuster: New York, NY (1998); pg. 64. "An in-depth random survey of 4,001 Americans... [1993] concluded that 30% of Americans are totally secular in outlook, 29% are barely or nominally religious, 22% modestly religious, and only 19% -- about 36 million -- regularly practice their religion. "
religious - active USA - 13.00% - - 1995 Morrison, Alexander B. "Life: The Gift Each Is Given " in Ensign (Dec. 1998). [Orig. source: "Religion in America: Will the Vitality of Churches Be the Surprises of the Next Century? " The Public Perspective, Oct.-Nov. 1993]; pg. 15. "In America, George Gallup Jr. has demonstrated that a significant gap exists between superficial religion (such as being religious for social reasons) and deep, transforming faith. He concluded that only 13% of Americans can be said to have a faith which permeates all aspects of their lives and affects how they behave. "
religious - claim to be active USA - 73.00% - - 1953 Herberg, Will. Protestant-Catholic-Jew: An Essay in American Religious Sociology; Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company (1960); pg. 49. "considerably more Americans regard themselves as church members than the statistics of church affiliation would indicate. Asked 'Do you happen at the present time to be an active member of a religious group?', 73% of Americans over 18 answered [yes] "
religious - modestly USA - 22.00% - - 1993 Reeves, Thomas C. The Empty Church: Does Organized Religion Matter Anymore? Simon & Schuster: New York, NY (1998); pg. 64. "An in-depth random survey of 4,001 Americans... [1993] concluded that 30% of Americans are totally secular in outlook, 29% are barely or nominally religious, 22% modestly religious, and only 19% -- about 36 million -- regularly practice their religion. "
religious - modestly USA - 22.00% - - 1993 Reeves, Thomas C. The Empty Church: Does Organized Religion Matter Anymore? Simon & Schuster: New York, NY (1998); pg. 64. "An in-depth random survey of 4,001 Americans... [1993] concluded that 30% of Americans are totally secular in outlook, 29% are barely or nominally religious, 22% modestly religious, and only 19% -- about 36 million -- regularly practice their religion. "
religious - only nominally USA - 29.00% - - 1993 Reeves, Thomas C. The Empty Church: Does Organized Religion Matter Anymore? Simon & Schuster: New York, NY (1998); pg. 64. "An in-depth random survey of 4,001 Americans... [1993] concluded that 30% of Americans are totally secular in outlook, 29% are barely or nominally religious, 22% modestly religious, and only 19% -- about 36 million -- regularly practice their religion. "
religious - practicing world - 65.00% - - 1997 Breuilly, Elizabeth, et al. Religions of the World: The Illustrated Guide to Origins, Beliefs, Traditions & Festivals. Facts on File Inc.: New York, NY (1997); pg. 12. "It is estimated that well over half the world's population practice, to a greater or lesser degree, one or other of the world's religions or indigenous spiritual traditions. "
religious conservative USA - 41.00% - - 1988 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 133. "...the study showed that the public was almost evenly divided between these two camps: 43% of those surveyed identified themselves as religious liberals (19% as very liberal); 41% identified themselves as religious conservatives (18% as very conservative); and only 16% found it impossible to identify with one or the other of these labels. "
religious conservative, very USA - 18.00% - - 1988 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 133. "...the study showed that the public was almost evenly divided between these two camps: 43% of those surveyed identified themselves as religious liberals (19% as very liberal); 41% identified themselves as religious conservatives (18% as very conservative); and only 16% found it impossible to identify with one or the other of these labels. "
religious liberal USA - 43.00% - - 1988 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 133. "...the study showed that the public was almost evenly divided between these two camps: 43% of those surveyed identified themselves as religious liberals (19% as very liberal); 41% identified themselves as religious conservatives (18% as very conservative); and only 16% found it impossible to identify with one or the other of these labels. "
religious liberal, very USA - 19.00% - - 1988 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 133. "...the study showed that the public was almost evenly divided between these two camps: 43% of those surveyed identified themselves as religious liberals (19% as very liberal); 41% identified themselves as religious conservatives (18% as very conservative); and only 16% found it impossible to identify with one or the other of these labels. "
Religious Right USA - 9.00% - - 1994 Diamong, Sara. Not by Politics Alone: The Enduring Influence of the Christian Right. New York: The Guilford Press (1998); pg. 8. "This data is roughly consistent with a 1994 New York Times-CBS New ssurvey that found about 9% of the public identifying themselves as part of the 'religious right.' "
Religious Right USA - 18.00% - - 1994 Gallagher, Winifred. Working on God. New York: Random House (1999); pg. 105. "Similarly, the religious right tends to be a noisy minority. Even at the time of the 1994 Republican landslide, only about 18% of the population considered themselves members of this movement. The strongest identifications were reported by Republicans, the elderly, Southerners, women, and people who hadn't attended college... "
Religious Right USA - - - - 1994 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 284. "The Christian Coalition, the major expression of the Religious Right, claimed in 1994 to have 1.5 million dues-paying members and the support of up to 20 percent of Americans. "
Religious Right USA - 7.00% - - 1996 Diamong, Sara. Not by Politics Alone: The Enduring Influence of the Christian Right. New York: The Guilford Press (1998); pg. 8. "In the middle of the 1996 campaign season, the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press released a study that found that... only 7% of the public consider themselves members of the 'religious right.' "
Religious Right USA 16,500,000 - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 366-367. "The differences between the designations of fundamentalist and born-again Christians are often blurred. Born-again Christians, who now number somewhere between 30 and 50 million Americans... However, not all born-again Christians can be defined as fundamentalists... national polls have indicated that as few as one-third of Americans who identify themselves as born-again Christians align themselves with the so-called Religious Right, which is dominated by politically active fundamentalists. "
Religious Right USA - 7.00% - - 1996 *LINK* Web site: Pew Research Center (1998): "The Diminishing Divide: American Churches, American Politics " "Only 7% of voters think of themselves as members of the 'religious right'. "
Religious Right USA - blacks - 30.00% - - 1994 Gallagher, Winifred. Working on God. New York: Random House (1999); pg. 105. "...Religious Right... Even at the time of the 1994 Republican landslide, only about 18% of the population considered themselves members of this movement... contrary to the popular impression, blacks were almost twice as likely (30%) as whites (17%) to describe themselves as members of the religious right. "
Religious Right USA - whites - 17.00% - - 1994 Gallagher, Winifred. Working on God. New York: Random House (1999); pg. 105. "...Religious Right... Even at the time of the 1994 Republican landslide, only about 18% of the population considered themselves members of this movement... contrary to the popular impression, blacks were almost twice as likely (30%) as whites (17%) to describe themselves as members of the religious right. "


Religious Right, continued

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