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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Re-formed Congregation of the Goddess, world

Re-formed Congregation of the Goddess, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Re-formed Congregation of the Goddess world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 92-93. "The Re-formed Congregation of the Goddess Inc., (RCG), unlike COG, does not see itself as a religious organization, but as an actual spiritual congregation. The Congregation is an international women's religion providing the benefits and recognition of organized religion to its members... is incorporated in... Wisconsin and recognized as a tax-exempt religion by the IRS... "
Re-formed Congregation of the Goddess - International world 2,400 - 5
units
8
countries
2005 *LINK* Source: email correspondence from: Jade River, Consistery Executive of Re-formed Congregation of the Goddess - International, POB 6677, Madison, WI 53716 Re-formed Congregation of the Goddess - International
Where - International
Number of Adherents - 2400
Number of units - 5
Number of countries - 8
Year began - 1983
Web address rcgi.org

Contact information: Jade River, Consistery Executive
Re-formed Congregation of the Goddess - International
POB 6677
Madison, WI 53716
(608) 226-9998
Tues. - Fri. from 1 - 5 PM central time
www.rcgi.org
rcgiorg@aol.com
Rebirthing United Kingdom: Britain 11,250 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "
Rebirthing - full-time United Kingdom: Britain 1,250 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; F/T column: 1,250
Reclaiming Collective USA - - - - 1995 Berger, Helen A. A Community of Witches: Contemporary Neo-Paganism and Witchcraft in the United States. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press (1999); pg. 111. "The Reclaiming Collective, which developed around twelve years ago around Starhawk's coven in the San Francisco Bay area, relies on volunteers to teach clases, run two-week intensive training sessions, and publish a newsletter (Adler 1986:413; Orion 1995:260). "
Reconstructionist Judaism Canada - - 2
units
- 1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 156. "A census by the Religious Dept. of the Canadian Jewish Congress indicates 53 of the synagogues are Orthodox, 43 are Conservative, 14 are Reform and two are Reconstructionist. "
Reconstructionist Judaism North America 120,000 - - - 1990 Kertzer, Morris N. & Lawrence A. Hoffman. What is a Jew (New & Completely Revised Ed.); New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 10, 16. "Of America's 6 million Jews [pg. 10]... Reconstructionism is the smallest movement in Judaism. In 1990, less than 2% of North American Jews said they were Reconstructionist [pg. 16]. "
Reconstructionist Judaism USA - - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 148. "In addition to these large groups, there is a small but influential movement called Reconstructionism that sees in Judaism principally a certain culture and a certain set of ethics. "
Reconstructionist Judaism USA - - - - 1968 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 601-602. "Reconstructionist Judaism... it achieved institutional status with the founding of the Society for the Advancement of Judaism in 1922, and in 1935 began disseminating its ideas in The Reconstructionist. With the establishment of the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Philadelphia in 1968, the movement obtained an independent position in Jewish life in the U.S. "
Reconstructionist Judaism USA - - - - 1968 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993); pg. 35. "Although the [Reconstructionist] movement was poised for growth by the late 1960s, it was still only a fringe phenomenon of a few thousand adherents, overshadowed by Reform, Conservative, and Orthodox Judaism. "
Reconstructionist Judaism USA - - 12
units
- 1973 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 978. "Organizationally it has become instead a very small and unpromising federation of a half-dozen or so Reconstructionist synagogues. "
Reconstructionist Judaism USA 60,000 - - - 1980 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 125. "In 1980, Conservative Judaism reported 1.5 millionmembers; Reform, 1.2 million; Orthodox, 1 million; and Reconstructionist, some 60,000. "
Reconstructionist Judaism USA - - 23
units
- 1980 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993); pg. 162. "The Federation of Reconstructionist Congregations and Havurot (FRCH) consisted of some 70 affiliates by the early 1990s. Although this represents a trebling of affiliates sinc e1980, it must be borne in mind that most of these institutions have relatively few members: some fellowships number as few as fifteen families, and congregations generally number between thirty-five and two hundred families. "
Reconstructionist Judaism USA - - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 270. "At the dawn of the third millennium there are unmistakable signs of a worldwide multidenominational religious revival... Reconstructionist Jews who edited the supernatural out of prayer books forty years ago are restoring references to miracles, mythology, and the Messiah. "
Reconstructionist Judaism USA 46,000 - - - 1990 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993); pg. 162. "According to the National Jewish Population Survey of 1990, just over 1 percent of adult Jews in the core population of American Jews identify as Reconstructionists, which translates into some 46,000 individuals. "
Reconstructionist Judaism USA 46,000 - - - 1990 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993); pg. 52-53. "The Conservative movement has remained virtually stationary, maintaining over one and a half million self-identified adherents, and the sharpest relative growth was sustained by the Reconstructionists, who grew by 200 percent and now number an estimated forty-six thousand adults. "
Reconstructionist Judaism USA - - 70
units
- 1991 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993); pg. 162. "The Federation of Reconstructionist Congregations and Havurot (FRCH) consisted of some 70 affiliates by the early 1990s. "
Reconstructionist Judaism USA 120,000 - - - 1994 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 170. "The majority of [the 6 million] American Jews are integrationist: 35% are Reform, 43% Conservative, and 2% Reconstructionist. "
Reconstructionist Judaism USA 100,000 - 80
units
- 1995 Magida, Arthur J. (ed). How to be a Perfect Stranger: A Guide to Etiquette in Other People's Religious Ceremonies. Woodstock, VT: Jewish Lights Publishing (1996); pg. 213. "U.S. synagogues/temples: Over 2,000 total; Reform: 890; Conservative: 800; Reconstructionist: 80...; U.S. membership: 4.1 million total; Reform: 2 million; Conservative: 1.6 million; Reconstructionist: 100,000...; (1995 data fom each denomination's central office, except Orthodox) "
Reconstructionist Judaism world 60,000 - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 253. "only about 60,000 members "
Reconstructionist Judaism world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 198. "Reconstructionism: The American movement, with branches elsewhere, founded by Mordecai Kaplan with a view to revitalizing Judaism in the modern world. The central idea of Reconstructionism is that Judaism is more than a religion in the narrow sense but is a religious civilization, with its own art, music, literature, culture, and folk-ways. Although Reconstructionists like Milton Steinberg were believers in the Personal God of traditional Judaism, the movement generally follows Kaplan's naturalistic interpretation in which God is the 'power that makes for salvation'. Moreover, 'salvation' in this context does not mean of the soul in the Hereafter but of the Jewish people on earth through the enrichment of Jewish life that is the result of an acceptance eof Jewish values and their dynamic adaptation to the new conditions in which Jews now find themselves. "
Reconstructionist Judaism world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 198-199. "Reconstructionism: ...At first Kaplan thought of the movement as one cutting across the usual divisions in Jewish life between Orthodoxy, Conservative, and Reform Judaism. But, while all three branches have been greatly influenced by Kaplan's ideas, their followers preferred to develop their own philosophies of Judaism. Kaplan's religious naturalism was far from being to everyone's religious taste. Reconstructionism has now developed as a fourth movement with its own seminary for the training of Reconstructionist Rabbis, the Rabbinical College in Wyncote, Pennsylvania, founded in 1957. A small number of Reconstructionist synagogues have also been established by Reconstructionist Rabbis serve in Reform and Conservative congregations as well. Founded in 1935, the journal The Reconstructionist is devoted to the philosophy of Reconstructionism. "
Reconstructionist Judaism - affiliated New York: New York City 8,000 - - - 1993 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993); pg. 162. "Reconstructionist movement... The Federation of Reconstructionist Congregations and Havurot... In the New York area, where close to half of America's Jews live, some two thousand families are affiliated. "
Reconstructionist Judaism - affiliated USA 50,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). Jews affiliated with synagogues in 1990 (NOTE: Many households do not have a synagogue affiliation): "Conservative synagogues reported 890,000 members; Reform, 760,000; Orthodox, 355,000; and Reconstructionist, some 50,000. "
Redeemed Assembly of Jesus Christ, Apostolic New York: New York City - - 1
unit
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Apostolic Pentecostals; pg. 268. "In 1980 the Church had six congregations, one in Richmond, Virginia, one in New York City, and four in the Washington, D.C. area. "
Redeemed Assembly of Jesus Christ, Apostolic USA - - 6
units
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Apostolic Pentecostals; pg. 268. "Membership: In 1980 the Church had six congregations, one in Richmond, Virginia, one in New York City, and four in the Washington, D.C. area. "
Redeemed Assembly of Jesus Christ, Apostolic Virginia - - 1
unit
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Apostolic Pentecostals; pg. 268. "In 1980 the Church had six congregations, one in Richmond, Virginia, one in New York City, and four in the Washington, D.C. area. "
Redeemed Assembly of Jesus Christ, Apostolic Washington, D.C. - - 4
units
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Apostolic Pentecostals; pg. 268. "In 1980 the Church had six congregations, one in Richmond, Virginia, one in New York City, and four in the Washington, D.C. area. "
Redeemed Assembly of Jesus Christ, Apostolic world - - 6
units
1
country
1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Apostolic Pentecostals; pg. 268. "Redeemed Assembly of Jesus Christ, Apostolic... Washington, DC [H.Q.]... was formed by James Frank Harris and Douglas Williams, two bishiops of the Highway Christian Church who rejected the leadership of that church by Bishop J. V. Lomax. They complained of... Membership: In 1980 the Church had six congregations, one in Richmond, Virginia, one in New York City, and four in the Washington, D.C. area. "
Redeemer's Army Illinois: Chicago - - - - 1913 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 115. "1913... A.E. Kimball... wrote [about] 'present difficulty we have in connection with so many Armies.'... Chicago produced the Redeemer's Army, the Christian Army, and the Samaritan, Saved, and Volunteer Rescue Armies. These agencies, which used uniforms, flags, and brass bands wherever they could muster them, caused great confusion to the public, who naturally mistook them for The Salvation Army... "
Reform Judaism Canada - - 14
units
- 1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 156. "A census by the Religious Dept. of the Canadian Jewish Congress indicates 53 of the synagogues are Orthodox, 43 are Conservative, 14 are Reform and two are Reconstructionist. "
Reform Judaism Germany - - 1
unit
1
country
1818 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 602. "Reform Judaism (Liberal or Progressive Judaism)... The first avowedly Reform 'temple' was founded in Hamburg in 1818. "
Reform Judaism India - - 1
unit
- 1925 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 202. "...the Jewish Religious Union, which has been India's only Reform temple since it was founded in 1925. But even there, membership depends less on theology than on education and class... "
Reform Judaism India - - 1
unit
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 202. "...the Jewish Religious Union, which has been India's only Reform temple since it was founded in 1925. But even there, membership depends less on theology than on education and class. The Jewish Religious Union is patronized exclusively by the Bene Israel elite: doctors, lawyers, and other well-educated members of the community. "
Reform Judaism North America 1,610,000 - - - 1986 Noss., David S. & John B. Noss. A History of the World's Religions. Macmillian (1990).; pg. 440. "One study completed in 1986 found that 10 percent of Jews surveyed described themselves as Orthodox, 32 percent as Conservative, 23 percent as Reform, and 35% as "just Jewish. " I combined this percentage with the 7 million Jews in North America figure.
Reform Judaism North America 2,520,000 - - - 1990 Kertzer, Morris N. & Lawrence A. Hoffman. What is a Jew (New & Completely Revised Ed.); New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 10, 12. "Of America's 6 million Jews, approximately 6% identified themselves as Orthodox in 1990 [pg. 10]... Today North American Jewry is about 42% Reform, making Reform Judaism the largest & fastest-growing Jewish movement. "
Reform Judaism Tennessee - Middle - - 2
units
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Shirley Zeitlen and Company Realtors "; web page: "Religion " [in Nashville, Tenn.] (viewed 15 June 1999). "There are approximately 6,000 Jews in Middle Tennessee who comprise four Jewish congregations, one Orthodox, one Conservative, two Reform, and a Jewish day school. "
Reform Judaism United Kingdom - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 135. "Liberal Judaism: The English branch of Reform Judaism founded by C. G. Montefiore. Liberal Judaism in England corresponds to American Reform Judaism and is to the left of both Reform Judaism in England and what used to be called Liberal Judaism in Germany, the last two being closer to left-wing Conservative Judaism in the USA. Such are the complexities of religious labels in contemporary Jewish life. "
Reform Judaism United Kingdom: Britain 75,000 - - - 1993 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 18. "In Britain, 25 percent of the (approximately) 300,000 Jews are Liberal or Reform. "
Reform Judaism USA 200,000 - - - 1935 Hertzberg, Arthur. The Jews in America: Four Centuries of an Uneasy Encounter: A History; New York: Simon & Schuster (1989); pg. 279. "In 1935 a reasonably reliable estimate showed a million Jews who identified themselves as Orthodox. The Conservative synagogues, the newest denomination, claimed 300,000, and Reform had only 200,000. "
Reform Judaism USA - - 461
units
- 1954 Herberg, Will. Protestant-Catholic-Jew: An Essay in American Religious Sociology; Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company (1960); pg. 195. "Figures for the three 'denominations' in American Jewry are no more precise. In 1953-54 Reform claimed 461 congregations, conservatives 473, and American Orthodoxy 720, with an uncertain number, mostly of the older Orthodoxy, unaffiliated. "
Reform Judaism USA - - 500
units
- 1955 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 977. "In 1955 [Reform Jews] were gathered in slightly more than five hundred congregations, many of them exceedingly prosperous. "
Reform Judaism USA 1,200,000 - 550
units
- 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 148. "Among the approximately four million U.S. synagogue members (out of a total U.S. Jewish population of 5.2 million), some 40% are Orthodox, 30% Conservative and 30% Reform... To the Reform movement, with 550 congregations and more than a million members... "
Reform Judaism USA 1,000,000 - - - 1958 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Western Publishing Co. (1972). [11th printing; original edition: 1958]; pg. 106. "The Reform movement has, like the Conservatives, about a million members as against two millions for the Orthodox. "
Reform Judaism USA - - - - 1963 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993); pg. 5. "In 1937 the largest Reform temples numbered five to eight hundred families and only a half dozen had passed the thousand-family mark. By 1963, twenty such temples boasted over 1,400 families and a few exceeded 2,500 families. "
Reform Judaism USA 1,200,000 - - - 1980 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 125. "In 1980, Conservative Judaism reported 1.5 millionmembers; Reform, 1.2 million; Orthodox, 1 million; and Reconstructionist, some 60,000. "
Reform Judaism USA 1,489,280 0.62% - - 1983 *LINK* web page: "A REVIEW OF DATA ON JEWISH-AMERICANS " (1998) [Orig. source: Feldstein, Donald. The American Jewish Community in the 21st Century - A Projection. New York, NY: American Jewish Congress (March 1984)] "In 1983, there were 5,728,000 persons who identified themselves as Jews in the U.S., comprising 2.4 percent of the population... 26% of Jews today identify themselves as Reform; 36% as Conservative; 6% as Orthodox; and 32% are not affiliated. "
Reform Judaism USA - - - - 1990 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993); pg. 53. "Reform continues to exhibit great popularity in its traditional areas of strength--the Midwest and South--but is gaining many new adherents throughout the nation. A plurality of Jews in Los Angeles, Boston, and Cleveland now identifies with Reform. "
Reform Judaism USA 1,925,000 - - - 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). 16% of U.S. Jews are Orthodox; 43% Conservative; 35% Reform; 6% Recons. or none (Figures refer to Core Jews (the 5,500,000 religious and nominally religious Jews, out of total 6,840,000 "Jewish Identified Population ", or total Jews including merely ethnic.)
Reform Judaism USA 2,100,000 - - - 1994 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 170. "The majority of [the 6 million] American Jews are integrationist: 35% are Reform, 43% Conservative, and 2% Reconstructionist. "
Reform Judaism USA 2,000,000 - 890
units
- 1995 Magida, Arthur J. (ed). How to be a Perfect Stranger: A Guide to Etiquette in Other People's Religious Ceremonies. Woodstock, VT: Jewish Lights Publishing (1996); pg. 213. "U.S. synagogues/temples: Over 2,000 total; Reform: 890; Conservative: 800...; U.S. membership: 4.1 million total; Reform: 2 million; Conservative: 1.6 million...; (1995 data fom each denomination's central office, except Orthodox) "
Reform Judaism USA 1,500,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Rifkin, Ira. "Reform Judaism Edges Toward Traditions Forsaken 114 Years Ago " in Salt Lake Tribune, Saturday, May 22, 1999 (viewed online 22 May 1999). [Orig. source: Religion News Service] "...Reform Jews in the South, Southwest and lower Midwest... are distanced from more tradition-oriented Jewish communities on the East and West Coasts... within the 1.5 million-member movement -- the largest among American Jews... "
Reform Judaism world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 602. "Reform Judaism (Liberal or Progressive Judaism)... Reform Judaism today, centered mostly but not exclusively in North America, stresses... Reform Judaism in the United States maintians a seminary, the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion (Cincinnati); a rabbinical organization, the Central Conference of American Rabbis (CCAR); and a confederation of synagogues, the Union of American Hebrew Congregations (UAHC). "
Reform Judaism world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 200. "Reform Judaism: ...Essentially, Reform Judaism departs from Orthodox Judaism in its understanding of revelation. For Orthodoxy the Torah is the revealed will of God and the Jew is required to observe the commands of the Torah not because they enrich his spiritual life (though Orthodoxy believes that they do have this effect) but because this is God's will. Reform, with its doctrines of 'progressive revelation', believes that in successive generations God allows for different appreciations of the truth of the Torah. " [More.]
Reform Judaism world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 199-200. "Reform Judaism: The religious movement which arose in early nineteenth-century Germany with the aim of reinterpreting (or 'reforming') Judaism in the light of Western thought, values, and culture where such reinterpretation does not come into conflict with Judaism's basic principles. (Orthodox Judaism maintains that the very principle of Reform is in conflict with the basic principle of faith that the Torah is immutable.) After the Emancipation and the emergence of the Jew into Western society, the need for a degree of adaptation of the traditional faith to the new conditions of life was keenly felt. The Haskalah movement of Enlightenment, of which Moses Mendelssohn was the leading figure, grappled with... " [More historical and other info.]
Reform Judaism - affiliated USA 50,000 - - - 1937 Glazer, Nathan. American Judaism (Second Edition); Chicago: University of Chicago Press (1972); pg. 105. "In 1937-38 the synagogue, in all its forms, represented a minority of the American Jews. The American Jewish Year Book estimated that Reform congregations in that year had 50,000 members... "
Reform Judaism - affiliated USA - - 290
units
- 1937 Glazer, Nathan. American Judaism (Second Edition); Chicago: University of Chicago Press (1972); pg. 108. "Jewish statistics demonstrating this 'Jewish revival' are as unreliable as any other privately collected statistics. Nevertheless, even viewed critically, the changes shown by the figures are impressive... Reform, with 290 temples and 50,000 families in 1937, reported 520 congregations and 255,000 families [in 1956]. "
Reform Judaism - affiliated USA - - 520
units
- 1956 Glazer, Nathan. American Judaism (Second Edition); Chicago: University of Chicago Press (1972); pg. 108. "Jewish statistics demonstrating this 'Jewish revival' are as unreliable as any other privately collected statistics. Nevertheless, even viewed critically, the changes shown by the figures are impressive... Reform, with 290 temples and 50,000 families in 1937, reported 520 congregations and 255,000 families [in 1956]. "
Reform Judaism - affiliated USA 1,200,000 - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 148. "Among the approximately four million U.S. synagogue members (out of a total U.S. Jewish population of 5.2 million), some 40% are Orthodox, 30% Conservative and 30% Reform. "
Reform Judaism - affiliated USA 551,034 0.23% - - 1985 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993). [Orig. source: Nine City Sample, North American Jewish Data Bank]; pg. 53. "Synagogue membership is claimed by 73% of Jews who identified themselves as Orthodox, 53% as Conservative, 37% as Reform. "
Reform Judaism - affiliated USA 760,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). Jews affiliated with synagogues in 1990 (NOTE: Many households do not have a synagogue affiliation): "Conservative synagogues reported 890,000 members; Reform, 760,000; Orthodox, 355,000; and Reconstructionist, some 50,000. "
Reform Judaism - affiliated USA 1,300,000 - 850
units
- 1993 *LINK* Religious Requirements & Practices of Certain Selected Groups: A Handbook for Chaplains (1993) - (online ed. - 1998); contract #: MDA903-90-C-0062 w/ Dept. of Defense; J. Gordon Melton, Project Director & James Lewis. "MEMBERSHIP: 850 Member-congregations; 1.3 million members. "
Reform Judaism - attend at least monthly USA 178,714 0.07% - - 1985 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993). [Orig. source: Nine City Sample, North American Jewish Data Bank]; pg. 53. "Synagogue attendance twelve or more times annually is claimed by 55% of self-identified Orthodox Jews, 21% of Conservatives, and 12% of self-proclaimed Reform Jews. By contrast, 45% of the Orthodox claimed to attend synagogue once or more a week, compared with only 8% of Jews who identified themselves as Conservative and 2.5% who identified as Reform. "
Reform Judaism - attend weekly USA 37,232 0.02% - - 1985 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993). [Orig. source: Nine City Sample, North American Jewish Data Bank]; pg. 53. "Synagogue attendance twelve or more times annually is claimed by 55% of self-identified Orthodox Jews, 21% of Conservatives, and 12% of self-proclaimed Reform Jews. By contrast, 45% of the Orthodox claimed to attend synagogue once or more a week, compared with only 8% of Jews who identified themselves as Conservative and 2.5% who identified as Reform. "
Reform Judaism - chavurot USA 1,935 - 129
units
- 1982 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993); pg. 69. "Although definitive statistics are not available on the number of synagogue-based havurot, it is clear that the model proposed by Schulweis had been adopted by a significant number of congregations. A survey conducted by a Reform commission headed by Rabbi Saul Rubin in the early 1980s found that at least 129 Reform temples sponsored havurot, with the largest numbers inthe Northeast and on the West Coast. Most contained between ten and nineteen people... "


Reform Judaism - chavurot, continued

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