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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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back to Radhasoami, world

Radhasoami, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Radhasoami world 2,000,000 - - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994); pg. 426. Sikhism:Radhasoami:
"their worldwide followers number well over two million, including members from other religions. "
Radhasoami world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "RADHA SOAMI MOVEMENT: a HINDU REFORM MOVEMENT which emerged after the death of Shiv Dayal who incorporated SIKH BELIEFS and practices around a FORM of YOGA. The movement differentiates itself from the Sikhs in that the GURU replaces the SCRIPTURE as the source of religious knowledge and by rejecting Sikh initiation. "
Radhasoami Satsang India - - - - 1915 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 596. "Radha Soami Satsang. A sect containing elements of Hinduism and Sikhism; founded by a Hindu banker, Shiv Dayal of Agra (1818-78)... On his death his followers split. One branch remained at Agra under Rai Saligram Bahadur (1828-98), then under Brahma Sankar Misra (1861-1907) moved to Allahabad, and finally to Banaras. The Agra branch under Sri Anand Swarup, who became its head in 1915, set up an industrial estate in the suburb of Dayalbagh, where they also erected a large marble temple. "
Radhasoami Satsang world - - - - 1861 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 319. "Another Hindu movement which early developed an international following was the Radha Soami Satsang... the teachings of the Radha Soami line of masters, established in Agra in 1861, were more consistent with the Yoga of the universal sound current... and the devotion to Radha Soami masters... closely echoed medieval esoteric Hindu teachings. The novelty of Radha Soami came in the establishment of an industrial city at Dayalbagh, near Agra... "
Radhasoami Satsang world - - 116
units
- 1907 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 103. "1907... [Maharaj Sahab's] succession was disputed, however, by a majority of the Central Council, although 111 of the 116 branch Satsangs "
Radhasoami Satsang world - - 600
units
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 105. "There are now seven registered Regional Radhasoami Satsang Associations, supervising the activities of District Satsang Associations and some 600 branch Satsangs. "
Radical Faeries - sanctuaries Canada - - 1
unit
- 1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 320. "...there are four faerie sanctuaries: Short Mountain in Tennessee, Kawashaway in Minnesota, Amber Fox in Ontario, and Wolf Creek in Oregon. "
Radical Faeries - sanctuaries Minnesota - - 1
unit
- 1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 320. "...there are four faerie sanctuaries: Short Mountain in Tennessee, Kawashaway in Minnesota, Amber Fox in Ontario, and Wolf Creek in Oregon. "
Radical Faeries - sanctuaries North America - - 4
units
2
countries
1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 320. "The Radical Faeries are a loosely affiliated group of men around the country who celebrate a kind of pagan spirituality. A central tenet of faerie lore is that there is no single definition of faerie Faerie is a self-assumed identity--permeable, mutable, contradictory... Some would place the starting of the faerie movement as a Labor Day weekend gathering in 1979 in Arizona. But I would say this was just one event, a festive blip, in a line going infinitely back... faeries are mostly gay men. The other boundary is geographic: North America. As such, faeries draw from the cultural traditions that come together on that part of the planet: europa, diaspora black, Native American, Hispanic, Asian... As of this writing, there are four faerie sanctuaries: Short Mountain in Tennessee, Kawashaway in Minnesota, Amber Fox in Ontario, and Wolf Creek in Oregon. But then, there are many other faerie sanctuaries: city apartments, small farms, a knoll in the park. It's all in the living. "
Radical Faeries - sanctuaries Ontario - - 1
unit
- 1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 320. "...there are four faerie sanctuaries: Short Mountain in Tennessee, Kawashaway in Minnesota, Amber Fox in Ontario, and Wolf Creek in Oregon. "
Radical Faeries - sanctuaries Oregon - - 1
unit
- 1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 320. "...there are four faerie sanctuaries: Short Mountain in Tennessee, Kawashaway in Minnesota, Amber Fox in Ontario, and Wolf Creek in Oregon. "
Radical Faeries - sanctuaries Tennessee - - 1
unit
- 1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 320. "...there are four faerie sanctuaries: Short Mountain in Tennessee, Kawashaway in Minnesota, Amber Fox in Ontario, and Wolf Creek in Oregon. "
Radical Faeries - sanctuaries USA - - 3
units
- 1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 320. "...there are four faerie sanctuaries: Short Mountain in Tennessee, Kawashaway in Minnesota, Amber Fox in Ontario, and Wolf Creek in Oregon. "
Radical Faeries - sanctuaries world - - 4
units
2
countries
1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 320. "...there are four faerie sanctuaries: Short Mountain in Tennessee, Kawashaway in Minnesota, Amber Fox in Ontario, and Wolf Creek in Oregon. "
Raelian Australia - - - - 1992 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The International Raelian Movement was founded in France in 1973... There have been members of the Raelian Movement in Australia since 1992. "
Raelian Denmark 0 - - - 1997 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "International Raelian Movement... no supporters of the Raelians are, by the way, known to exist in either Norway, Denmark or Finland. "
Raelian Europe 10,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "New Religious Movements " (University of Virginia); web page: "Raelians " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Faye Whittemore For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " "Palmer obtained some of her numbers from the British National Guide, Dr. Marcus Wenner, who, in 1995, believed there were 10,000 members in Europe, and that the movement existed in 67 countries. (Palmer, 1995A:195) "
Raelian Finland 0 - - - 1997 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "International Raelian Movement... no supporters of the Raelians are, by the way, known to exist in either Norway, Denmark or Finland. "
Raelian France - - - - 1973 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The International Raelian Movement was founded in France in 1973. It spread rapidly in French speaking countries in Europe, Africa and the Americas... "
Raelian Japan 4,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "New Religious Movements " (University of Virginia); web page: "Raelians " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Faye Whittemore For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " "Size of Group:... the figure offered by Susan Palmer, a sociologist who has studied the group... Japan (4,000 members), and Quebec (4,000 members). "
Raelian Norway 0 - - - 1997 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "International Raelian Movement... no supporters of the Raelians are, by the way, known to exist in either Norway, Denmark or Finland. "
Raelian Quebec 4,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "New Religious Movements " (University of Virginia); web page: "Raelians " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Faye Whittemore For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " "Size of Group:... the figure offered by Susan Palmer, a sociologist who has studied the group... Japan (4,000 members), and Quebec (4,000 members). "
Raelian Sweden 6 - - - 1997 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "International Raelian Movement... Contacting the Swedish congregation, I learned that the membership in early 1997 amounted to six [sic] individuals... "
Raelian world 30,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "New Religious Movements " (University of Virginia); web page: "Raelians " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Faye Whittemore For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " "Size of Group: The Official Homepage of the Raelian Religion claims that there are 40,000 members, representing 80 different countries. This number is at considerable variance with the figure offered by Susan Palmer, a sociologist who has studied the group. Palmer estimates that there are between 20,000 and 30,000 members worldwide, most of who are in French-speaking Europe, Japan (4,000 members), and Quebec (4,000 members). Palmer obtained some of her numbers from the British National Guide, Dr. Marcus Wenner, who, in 1995, believed there were 10,000 members in Europe, and that the movement existed in 67 countries.(Palmer, 1995A:195) "
Raelian world - - - 67
countries
1995 *LINK* web site: "New Religious Movements " (University of Virginia); web page: "Raelians " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Faye Whittemore For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " "Palmer obtained some of her numbers from the British National Guide, Dr. Marcus Wenner, who, in 1995, believed there were 10,000 members in Europe, and that the movement existed in 67 countries. (Palmer, 1995A:195) "
Raelian world 40,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* Rothstein, Mikael. "Patterns of Diffusion and Religious Globalization: An Empirical Survey of New Religious Movements " in Temenos 32 (1996), 195-220. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999) "A final example is the International Raelian Movement, which claims an international membership of 40,000 individuals. Obviously this is a gross exaggeration. "
Raelian world 27,000 - - 67
countries
1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The International Raelian Movement was founded in France in 1973. It spread rapidly in French speaking countries in Europe, Africa and the Americas. Following the translation of the Messages into English and other languages, the movement now exists in 67 countries in the world, and has over 27,000 members. There have been members of the Raelian Movement in Australia since 1992. "
Raelian world 40,000 - - 85
countries
1998 *LINK* official web site: "Raelian Mother Site "; home page (viewed 1 March 1999) The world's largest UFO related non profit organisation, 40 000 members in 85 countries, JOIN NOW!
Raelian world 40,000 - - 80
countries
1998 *LINK* web site: "New Religious Movements " (University of Virginia); web page: "Raelians " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Faye Whittemore For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " "Size of Group: The Official Homepage of the Raelian Religion claims that there are 40,000 members, representing 80 different countries. This number is at considerable variance with the figure offered by Susan Palmer, a sociologist who has studied the group. Palmer estimates that there are between 20,000 and 30,000 members worldwide... "
Rahasya Sampradaya Russia 250 - 15
units
- 1993 *LINK* "Russian Swami Finds Forefather's Faith in Sanatana Dharma " in Hinduism Today International (Sept. 1993, Vol. 15, No. 10) There are fifteen spiritual communities and satsang groups with 250 members in Moscow and other towns
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho Germany 5,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Osho-Bewegung " in table. Source: REMID.
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho Germany, West 41,000 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; "This movement was 'officially' disbanded... after these statistics were compiled " but many followers still consider themselves disciples.; Total: 41,000; Full-time: 1,000.
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho Italy 16,000 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; "This movement was 'officially' disbanded... after these statistics were compiled " but many followers still consider themselves disciples.
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho Netherlands 15,000 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; "This movement was 'officially' disbanded... after these statistics were compiled " but many followers still consider themselves disciples.; Total: 15,000; Full-time: 500.
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho Sweden 1,300 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; "This movement was 'officially' disbanded... after these statistics were compiled " but many followers still consider themselves disciples.; Total: 1,300; Full-time: 300.
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho Switzerland 1,200 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; "This movement was 'officially' disbanded... after these statistics were compiled " but many followers still consider themselves disciples.
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho United Kingdom: Britain 4,000 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; "This movement was 'officially' disbanded... after these statistics were compiled " but many followers still consider themselves disciples; All 4,000 are in "full-time " column of table.
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho United Kingdom: Britain 600 - - - 1999 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Source for British figure: the religious organization. Notes from author: "The woman who answered when I rang Osho... gave me one estimate and then asked the other 2 people in the office, who came up with 2 totally different estimates. Well, she said, it all depends what you mean by a follower of Osho. "] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... Osho: Britain: 600 - 3,000 (1999); World: 200,000 (1998) "
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho United Kingdom: Britain 3,000 - - - 1999 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Source for British figure: the religious organization. Notes from author: "The woman who answered when I rang Osho... gave me one estimate and then asked the other 2 people in the office, who came up with 2 totally different estimates. Well, she said, it all depends what you mean by a follower of Osho. "] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... Osho: Britain: 600 - 3,000 (1999); World: 200,000 (1998) "
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 319. "Another controversial guru in India, Bhagwan Rajneesh (b. 1931), is also predominantly supported by Americans and other Westerners... "
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho world 250,000 - 400
units
- 1982 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 293. "Rajneesh has more than 400 centers worldwide, and various estimates of the number of his followers range from 100,000 to 250,000. "
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho world - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "new sects and movements in Hinduism both in India and the West, for example, the Sri Aurobindo Ashram, the Theosophical Society, Arya Samaj,... the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (Hare Krishna), and movements centering on Meher Baba, Sathya Sai Baba, Bhagwan Rajneesh, and others "
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho world 200,000 - - - 1998 Chryssides, George. Exploring New Religions. London, U.K.: Cassells (1999). [Original source of world figure: web site: Ontario Consulants for Religious Tolerance] "I have selected the best available [statistics], providing a range where adjudication is impossible... Osho: Britain: 600 - 3,000 (1999); World: 200,000 (1998) "
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho world 200,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance "Formerly often referred to as Rejneeshism. They operate about 20 meditation centers worldwide. At its peak, they had about 200,000 members and 600 centers around the world. "
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho world 200,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance "Formerly often referred to as Rejneeshism. They operate about 20 meditation centers worldwide. At its peak, they had about 200,000 members and 600 centers around the world. "
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho - full-time Germany, West 1,000 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; "This movement was 'officially' disbanded... after these statistics were compiled " but many followers still consider themselves disciples.; Total: 41,000; Full-time: 1,000.
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho - full-time Germany, West 6,500 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. "Another more detailed assessment for West Germany covering many more movements concludes that well over one million people are involved or 'influenced' by new religions, with a 'full-time' membership of 64,200. The estimated full time membership for 12 of these movements is: " [table]
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho - full-time Netherlands 500 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; "This movement was 'officially' disbanded... after these statistics were compiled " but many followers still consider themselves disciples.; Total: 15,000; Full-time: 500.
Rajneesh Foundation/Osho - full-time Sweden 300 - - - 1987 Clarke, Peter B. The New Evangelists: Recruitment, Method and Aims of New Religious Movements, London: Ethnographics (1987); pg. 10 to 14. Table with following columns: Movement; Total Membership; Full-Time Members; P/T Members; Sympathizers.; For this study Clarke "approached researchers & observers in the field of new religions [& org./church reps.] to obtain their opinions & any hard... data "; "This movement was 'officially' disbanded... after these statistics were compiled " but many followers still consider themselves disciples.; Total: 1,300; Full-time: 300.
Rama worship India - - - - 40 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 781. "Of the fourteen avatars recognized by most texts and traditions, Rama and Krishna are the two major deities of Vaisnavism, usually but not always exclusive of one another... The Rama sect. Their primary text is the Epic Ramayana, first composed in Sanskrit by Valmiki sometime around the beginning of the Christian era. "
Rama worship India - - - - 1100 C.E. *LINK* Tamminen, Tapio. "Hindu Revivalism and the Hindutva Movement " in Temenos 32 (1996), 221-238. (Viewed online, Temenos web site, 30 Jan. 1999). "The Rama cult originates from the fifth and sixth centuries AD. According to Hans Bakker, the myth of Vishnu's incarnation as Rama became popular in the Gupta age. But the cult in which Rama was worshipped as the supreme form and main manifestation of Vishnu did not rise until the eleventh and twelfth centuries. It began to emerge in the latest period of independent Hindu rule in North India and before Muslim power was firmly established (Bakker 1986: 63, 66; Srivastava 1991: 39). "
Rama worship India - - - - 1450 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 54-55. "Prominent Vaishnavites included... Ramananda (early 15th century), who began the cult of Rama worship, which over the years spawned two movements. "
Ramakrishna Order Argentina - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official web site Counted from "Ramakrishna Order Centers in the West " list
Ramakrishna Order Bangladesh - - 10
units
- 1997 *LINK* "Diaspora " in Hinduism Today International (June 1997) In Bangladesh there are ten affliated Ramakrishna Mission centers which all play a great role in relief and rehabilitation work.
Ramakrishna Order California - - 8
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site Counted from "Ramakrishna Order Centers in the West " list
Ramakrishna Order Canada - - 1
unit
- 1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 140. "There are 13 such Centers in the United States and one in Canada. All are under the spiritual guidance of the Ramakrishna Mission, organized by Swami Vivekananda in India. "
Ramakrishna Order Canada - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official web site Counted from "Ramakrishna Order Centers in the West " list
Ramakrishna Order France - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official web site Counted from "Ramakrishna Order Centers in the West " list
Ramakrishna Order Illinois - - 2
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site Counted from "Ramakrishna Order Centers in the West " list
Ramakrishna Order India - - 100
units
- 1972 Harper, Marvin Henry. Gurus, Swamis, and Avatars: Spiritual Masters and their American Disciples; Philadelphia: Westminster Press (1972); pg. 135. "There are 150 [Ramakrishna Math ( "Monastary ") and Mission] centers, about fifty outside India. The Mission operates in India a dozen modern hospitals and sixty clinics, 8 colleges, and 35 high schools, and more than 100 lower schools. "
Ramakrishna Order India - - 200
units
- 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 286. "Ramakrishna Order... The main seat of the order is the Belur Math, on the Ganges near Calcutta. In addition, 200 monasteries are scattered throughout India. "
Ramakrishna Order India - - 97
units
- 1991 *LINK* "Global Dharma " in Hinduism Today International (Apr. 1994) It had grown by the 1990's to include 130 branches in 13 countries, including 97 in India. Here is a summary from their 1991 General Report for the year 1990-1991. [Termed "Ramakrishna Mission "]
Ramakrishna Order India - - 100
units
- 1994 *LINK* "Nation Building and Man Making Make Up Vivekananda Kendra's Mission " in Hinduism Today International (June 1994) Vivekananda Kendra, which started out as an idea 20 years ago, today has 100 branch centers throughout India. [Termed "Ramakrishna Mission "]
Ramakrishna Order Japan - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official web site Counted from "Ramakrishna Order Centers in the West " list
Ramakrishna Order Massachusetts - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* official web site Counted from "Ramakrishna Order Centers in the West " list


Ramakrishna Order, continued

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