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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Protestant - active, Guatemala

Protestant - active, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Protestant - affiliated Africa - 20.20% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan (1993); pg. 21. Table
Protestant - affiliated Asia - 3.90% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan (1993); pg. 21. Table
Protestant - affiliated Caribbean - 16.50% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan (1993); pg. 21. Table
Protestant - affiliated Eurasia - 1.10% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan (1993); pg. 21. Table. Eurasia & Europe listed separately.
Protestant - affiliated Europe - 18.30% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan (1993); pg. 21. Table. Eurasia & Europe listed separately.
Protestant - affiliated Japan 233,000 - - - 1940 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 387. "Statistics covering the status of Protestant denominations at the close of 1940 showed 233,000 members of churches, 1,931 organized churches, and 951 self-supporting churches. "
Protestant - affiliated Latin America - 12.10% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan (1993); pg. 21. Table
Protestant - affiliated Middle East - 0.60% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan (1993); pg. 21. Table
Protestant - affiliated North America - 40.60% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan (1993); pg. 21. Table
Protestant - affiliated Oceania - 37.00% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan (1993); pg. 21. Table. Location listed in table as 'Pacific'
Protestant - affiliated USA - 6.67% - - 1800 Feldman, Egal. Dual Destinies: The Jewish Encounter with Protestant America; Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press (1990); pg. 50. "Charles Cole, a student of American Christian history:... during the first half of the 19th century Protestant churches experienced a tenfold increase in their membership; that while in 1800 one out of every 15 Americans belonged to a Protestant church, by 1935 'the ratio was one out of eight.' "
Protestant - affiliated USA - 12.50% - - 1835 Feldman, Egal. Dual Destinies: The Jewish Encounter with Protestant America; Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press (1990); pg. 50. "Charles Cole, a student of American Christian history:... during the first half of the 19th century Protestant churches experienced a tenfold increase in their membership; that while in 1800 one out of every 15 Americans belonged to a Protestant church, by 1935 'the ratio was one out of eight.' "
Protestant - affiliated USA 59,000,000 35.12% - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 202. "In the U.S. alone 255 Protestant sects are recognized. But most American Protestants are in a half-dozen denominational families; 173 of the Protestant churches reporting membership figures contain less than 2 percent of the 59 million Protestant total. To an outside observer, the most striking fact about Christianity in the U.S. today is likely to be its numerical force--nearly 100 million adherents in a population of 168 million--and its divisions. "
Protestant - affiliated USA 61,505,000 - - - 1958 Herberg, Will. Protestant-Catholic-Jew: An Essay in American Religious Sociology; Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company (1960); pg. 123. "Protestantism in 1958 counted 61,505,000 members in the ranks of the churches--about 56% of the 109,557,000 Americans religiously affiliated. Although more than 200 bodies were listed... "
Protestant - affiliated USA - 40.88% - - 1987 Podell, Janet (ed.). Religion in American Life; New York: H. W. Wilson Company (1987); pg. 13. USA: 73% of Protestants are church members. Protestants cited as being 56% of U.S. pop., so affiliated is 40.88% of U.S. pop.] "Ofcourse, many Americans who say they are church members are effectively unchurched because of lack of involvement... "
Protestant - affiliated world 488,000,000 9.20% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan (1993); pg. 23. "Protestant 10.3%. 543 million... Affiliated 9.2%. 488 million... "
Protestant - affiliated world - 9.20% - - 1993 Johnstone. Operation World. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan (1993); pg. 21. Table
Protestant - Aguacatec-speaking Guatemala 1,200 - 4
units
- 1975 Scotchmer, David G. "Life of the Heart: A Maya Protestant Spirituality " in South and Meso-American Native Spirituality, ed. by Gary H. Gossen. New York: Crossroad Publishing Co. (1997); pg. 506. "Among the 17 language groups compared [among Guatemelan Maya], the Aguacatec had the greatest percentage of Protestants with over 12% and with some 1,200 members in four churches. (Lloret 1976, 245). "
Protestant - all non-Catholic/non-Orthodox world 741,000,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* 1996 Britannica Book of the Year "Protestantism (since 1517): 465 million, plus 276 million not on the main Protestant line. "
Protestant - all non-Catholic/non-Orthodox world 773,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* OPPOSING VIEW (anti-) web site: "Religion and 101 Cults ", by J. Dominguez; web page: "'Branches' of Christianity (General) "; (viewed 27 Feb. 1999) "Today, in 1998, the number is 2,100 million: 1,100 Catholics, 227 Orthodox, 773 Protestants. There are over 700 'denominations' "
Protestant - attend at least monthly USA - 44.85% - - 1947 Glazer, Nathan. American Judaism (Second Edition); Chicago: University of Chicago Press (1972); pg. 114. "In 1947, a national public opinion poll had shown that 18% of Jewish respondents attended service once a month (the comparative figures were 65% for Protestants and 85% for Catholics). " [Other sources show Protestant U.S. pop. for 1948 at 69%; 69% * 65% = 44.85%]
Protestant - attendance weekly Denmark - 4.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "; total population: 5,129,000; "*But attendance varies from 1% to 4%. "
Protestant - attendance weekly USA - 10.98% - - 1993 Reeves, Thomas C. The Empty Church: Does Organized Religion Matter Anymore? Simon & Schuster: New York, NY (1998); pg. 63. 1993 study by sociologists Mark Chaves and Kirk Hadaway "concluded that only 19.6% of Protestants and 28% of Catholics were in church on any given week. " [56% of U.S. pop. Protestant, times 19% attendance=10.98%]
Protestant - attendance weekly USA - 19.80% - - 1994 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 2, 55. "About 60% of American people are Protestants "; "Roughly one-third of the people who call themselves Protestant and one-half of those who are on the church rolls worshiped last weekend. "
Protestant - black denominations USA - - - - 1946 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 19. "Most of the Protestant denominations were predominantly white. One estimate, published in 1946, suggested that no more than one-half of 1 percent of the black population attended church with whites. As a result, the black population was active in building and promoting its own denominations. In all, there were 34 predominately black denominations, the membership of which derived overwhelmingly from Baptist or Methodist roots. "
Protestant - black denominations USA 10,000,000 - - - 1953 Herberg, Will. Protestant-Catholic-Jew: An Essay in American Religious Sociology; Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company (1960); pg. 113. "This would make something over 10,000,000 Negroes in well-established Negro churches. In addtion, there were about 900,000 in more or less mixed churches (including 350,000 Roman Catholics) "
Protestant - black denominations USA - 9.00% - - 1984 Podell, Janet (ed.). Religion in American Life; New York: H. W. Wilson Company (1987); pg. 11. "black Protestants [denominations], 9 percent... (These figures are based on a composite sample of over 17,000 Americans from the General Social Surveys, from 1972 to 1984... "
Protestant - black denominations USA - 9.00% - - 1994 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 64. "Nine [% of Americans] will list 'black Protestant' denominations or preferences. " [24% of Americans are in moderate Protestant denominations; 9% liberal; 16% conservative]
Protestant - black denominations USA 34,800,000 - - - 1997 Ash, Russell. The Top 10 of Everything, DK Publishing, Inc.: New York (1997); pg. 160-161. List: "Top 10 Religious Affiliations in the US "; (Rank: 3); Listed in table as "African-American Christian "
Protestant - born-again USA - 25.08% - - 1989 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992). [Orig. source: George Gallup, Jr. & Jim Castelli, "The People's Religion: American Faith in the 90's "; New York: Macmillan (1989), pp. 93]; pg. 161. "Among Protestants, 44% say they are born-again. And 13% of Roman Catholics and 20% of Mormons so identify themselves in Gallup surveys. " [Other sources indicate U.S. Protestants as being 56 or 58% in 1992. 57% * 44% = 25.08% of total pop.]
Protestant - Cakchiquel-speaking Guatemala 10,359 - - - 1975 Scotchmer, David G. "Life of the Heart: A Maya Protestant Spirituality " in South and Meso-American Native Spirituality, ed. by Gary H. Gossen. New York: Crossroad Publishing Co. (1997); pg. 505. "Among the four largest language groups [among Guatemelan Maya] in order of size -- that is, Quiche, Mam, Cakchiquel, and Kekchi -- the largest number of Protestants were found among the Quiche with 14,460 and Cakchiquel with 10,359 baptized believers in 1975. "
Protestant - charismatic/informal United Kingdom 12,000 - - - 1975 *LINK* web site: "Jesus Fellowship Church (Jesus Army) "; web page: About the Jesus Fellowship Church (Jesus Army) " (viewed 14 Feb. 1999) "The Jesus Fellowship, in common with the many other charismatic churches which share a similar informal approach, has shown remarkable growth over the past 25 years. The current edition of the UK Christian Handbook estimates that the membership of this type of church has grown from 12,000 to 140,000 since 1975, with attendance at meetings often exceeding this by up to 25%. "
Protestant - charismatic/informal United Kingdom 140,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Jesus Fellowship Church (Jesus Army) "; web page: About the Jesus Fellowship Church (Jesus Army) " (viewed 14 Feb. 1999) "The Jesus Fellowship, in common with the many other charismatic churches which share a similar informal approach, has shown remarkable growth over the past 25 years. The current edition of the UK Christian Handbook estimates that the membership of this type of church has grown from 12,000 to 140,000 since 1975, with attendance at meetings often exceeding this by up to 25%. "
Protestant - clergy Korea, South 31,740 - 21,243
units
- 1983 *LINK* web site: "Little Korea "; web page: "Religion " (viewed 22 Jan. 1999) Table: "Status of Religions " (as of 1983); 3 columns: "churches ", "clergymen ", "followers "; presumably this is from a government survey or census.
Protestant - clergy USA 299,586 - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 279. "In the U.S., Protestants have 299,586 ordained ministers... "
Protestant - conservative denominations USA - - - - 1965 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 193. "Still, conservative Protestant churches, which tended to stick to traditional biblical and cultural beliefs, continued to grow throughout the 1960s. Data on missionary personnel reflected the trend. Between 1958 and 1971, the United Methodist overseas task force dropped from 1,453 to 1,175. The number sent out by the conservative Southern Baptist Convention grew from 1,186 to 2,494. "
Protestant - conservative denominations USA - 15.00% - - 1984 Podell, Janet (ed.). Religion in American Life; New York: H. W. Wilson Company (1987); pg. 11. "...conservative Protestants--Southern Baptists, CHurch of God, Pentecostals, Assemblies of God, and many others--15 percent... (These figures are based on a composite sample of over 17,000 Americans from the General Social Surveys, from 1972 to 1984... "
Protestant - conservative denominations USA 23,405,100 - - - 1992 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994). [Source: Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches, 1992.]; pg. 165. "Table 6.1: Membership in Major Faiths in the U.S., 1989-1992 "; Inclusive membership. "Mainline Protestants (members of the National Council of Churches in Christ): 46,829,961; Conservative/fundamentalist Protestants (nonmembers of the National Council of Churches in Christ): 23,405,099. " [Pg. 179: includes Mormons, Jehovah's Witnesses, Churches of Christ, Southern Baptist Convention.]
Protestant - conservative denominations USA - 16.66% - - 1992 Marty, Martin E. & R. Scott Appleby. The Glory and the Power: The Fundamentalist Challenge to the Modern World; Boston: Beacon Press (1992); pg. 197. "Every sixth American describes himself or herself to the poll taker as 'conservative Protestant' or as belonging to a denomination classified as such. "
Protestant - conservative denominations USA - 16.00% - - 1994 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 64. "...about 16 out of a hundred [Americans] who belong to denominations that accept the designation 'conservative Protestant.' This includes Southern Baptists, Churches of Christ, Adventists... " [Other Protest.: 24% moderate; 9% liberal; 9% black denom.]
Protestant - conservative denominations USA - - - - 1994 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 284. "Conservative and fundamentalist denominations grew at a steady pace. In 1994, 15.6 million Southern Baptists comprised the largest Protestant denomination in the country. Between 1965 and 1989 the Asemblies of God grew 121 percent. The major metropolitan areas boasted large and affluent Bible-based nondenominational churches. The Christian Coalition, the major expression of the Religious Right, claimed in 1994 to have 1.5 million dues-paying members and the support of up to 20 percent of Americans. The Roman Catholics, bouyed by Hispanic immigration, passed the 60-million member mark. Mormons, highly active in missionary efforts, grew to more than 4 million in 1994. "
Protestant - independent/free churches world 40,000,000 - - - 1972 Marty, Martin E. Protestantism (History of Religion Series). New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1972); pg. 26. "Approximately equal in size to the Methodist churches [30,000,000] if taken seprately are the members of the Baptist complex. But if these are united with Congregationalism, the 35,000,000- plus 5,000,000-member combination ranks the 'independent' or 'free churches' with Presbyterian-Reformed and Agnlican communions [each with 40,000,000] "
Protestant - independent/free churches world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 266. "FREE CHURCH. Any denomination free from government control or support, in contrast to an established church. In England, Baptists, Congregationalists, Presbyterians, and others are free churches, and in Scotland several groups that left the Church of Scotland have been so designated. "
Protestant - liberal denominations USA - - - - 1887 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 25-26. "In the 1880s some liberal Protestant seminaries, such as Union in New York, began to teach reform as a religious duty. Younger ministers in the cities often threw open their churches to the disadvantaged and entered the battle against the suffering that surrounded them. In 1887, for example, Episcopalians created the Church Association for the Advancement of the Interests of Labor, which supported unions ans worked for the elimination of sweatshops, child labor, and slums. Congregationalists soon joined the effort, and Methodists were not far behind... A vital part of this surge to reform was a body of literature promoting what came to be called the Social Gospel. This involved a modification of the traditional emphasis on individual sin and salvation that stressed good works through the improvement of society. "
Protestant - liberal denominations USA - - - - 1965 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 193. "While levels of public belief remained high, church membership, attendance, and the importance placed on religion dropped. The liberal Protestant churches--the American Baptists, the Disciples of Christ, the Episcopalians, the Evangelical Lutherans, the Presbyterians, the Methodists, & members of the United Church of Christ--were especially hard hit and began to shrink for the first time. Some critics thouht that this was a consequence of the secularization of these bodies. By abandoning many traditional biblical beliefs, adopting radical theology & 'situation ethics,' and endorsing & financing demands by feminists, civil rights activists, & antiwar demonstrators, these denominations had become mere echoes of the counterculture. Defenders of the 'mainline' churches expressed great pride in social... activities, preferring to seek explanations for their falling numbers elsewhere. They noted... many people stayed home on Sunday because they thought churches 'behind the times'... "
Protestant - liberal denominations USA - 9.00% - - 1984 Podell, Janet (ed.). Religion in American Life; New York: H. W. Wilson Company (1987); pg. 11. "...liberal Protestant -- Congregationalists, Presbyterians, Episcopalians, and Unitarians--comprise 9% of the population... (These figures are based on a composite sample of over 17,000 Americans from the General Social Surveys, from 1972 to 1984... "
Protestant - liberal denominations USA - - - - 1985 Lindsey, Hal. Planet Earth - 2000 A.D.. Palos Verdes, California: Western Front, Ltd. (1994); pg. 35. "'If long-term trends continue, the once-dominant liberal and moderate denominations will soon become a minority in American Protestantism.'...this statement was made by Los Angeles Times religion writer John Dart in a front page news report [Los Angeles Times, April 6, 1985]. Dart pointed out that back in 1920, mainline Protestant churches like the Prebyterian, Episcopal, Methodist and Lutheran constituted 76% of the Protestant population in the U.S. But by the mid-1980s [other sources indicate U.S. Protestants were about 56% of pop., 1924], that figure was down to about 50%. "
Protestant - liberal denominations USA - 9.00% - - 1994 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 63. "Eight or nine [%] will say 'liberal' depicts them or their church--such as the Episcopalians, the Presbyterians, or the United Church of Christ. " [24% of Americans are in moderate Protestant denominations; 9% black Protestant denom.; 16% conservative]
Protestant - liberal denominations USA - - - - 1995 Reeves, Thomas C. Twentieth Century America: A Brief History. New York: Oxford University Press (2000); pg. 283. "America's churches remained in a pattern that was set in the 1960s. Leaders of the mainline denominations such as the Presbyterians, Episcopalians, and Methodists still clung to the standards and tastes of contemporary liberalism, and their churches continued to shrink in size. In 1995, a researcher observed that the Methodist church, which had flourished in America during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, had lost one thousand members every week for the last thirty years. The Episcopal church had as many active members (1.6 million) as it enjoyed during World War II. Mainline seminaries were often proud bastions of leftist thought and practice, echoing the prestigious nondenominational institutions such as Harvard Divinity School and Union Theological Seminary. "
Protestant - mainline USA - 19.76% - - 1920 Lindsey, Hal. Planet Earth - 2000 A.D.. Palos Verdes, California: Western Front, Ltd. (1994); pg. 35. "...back in 1920 [other sources indicate U.S. Protestants were about 26% of pop., 1920], mainline Protestant churches like the Prebyterian, Episcopal, Methodist and Lutheran constituted 76% of the Protestant population in the U.S. But by the mid-1980s, that figure was down to about 50%. "
Protestant - mainline USA - 28.00% - - 1984 Lindsey, Hal. Planet Earth - 2000 A.D.. Palos Verdes, California: Western Front, Ltd. (1994); pg. 35. "'If long-term trends continue, the once-dominant liberal and moderate denominations will soon become a minority in American Protestantism.'...this statement was made by Los Angeles Times religion writer John Dart in a front page news report [Los Angeles Times, April 6, 1985]. Dart pointed out that back in 1920, mainline Protestant churches like the Prebyterian, Episcopal, Methodist and Lutheran constituted 76% of the Protestant population in the U.S. But by the mid-1980s [other sources indicate U.S. Protestants were about 56% of pop., 1984], that figure was down to about 50%. "
Protestant - mainline USA - - - - 1990 Diamong, Sara. Not by Politics Alone: The Enduring Influence of the Christian Right. New York: The Guilford Press (1998); pg. 10. "Mark Shibley, a sociologist of religion, was intrigued by data showing that between 1971 and 1990 evangelical churches added more than 6 million members [in the U.S.] while the so-called mainline moderate and liberal Protestant churches lost about 2.6 million members. "
Protestant - mainline USA - - - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 273. "Mainline churches fare well in stable eras but decline in times of great change.

Mainline religion is largely uncomfortable with a literal definition of millenarianism; Catholicism brands it heresy. In the 1960's the mainstream's previously healthy growth rates began to decline precipitiously.

The figures below compare membership in 1965 with the latest members cited in the 1988 Yearbook of American and Canadian Churches:

The United Methodist Church dropped from a high of 11 million members in 1965 to 9.2 million.

The Presbyterian Church, USA, has lost nearly 1 million members. Membership now stands at 3 million. " [Etc. for Disciples of Christ, Episcopal Church, and Lutherans]

Protestant - mainline USA 46,829,960 - - - 1992 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994). [Source: Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches, 1992.]; pg. 165. "Table 6.1: Membership in Major Faiths in the U.S., 1989-1992 "; Inclusive membership. "Mainline Protestants (members of the National Council of Churches in Christ) "
Protestant - mainline USA 23,854,528 8.90% - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996). [Source of membership figures for the 7 denominations listed: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches]; pg. 372. "...whereas the Catholic and Orthodox churches have remained relatively monolithic, Protestants have splintered into countless denominations and individual churches. The seven traditionally liberal denominations that make up most of so-called mainline Protestantism are the Episcopal Church, the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), the United Methodist Church, the American Baptist Churches, the United Church of Christ, the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. But even those represent only a fraction of all Protestant sects, and their membership has declined sharply over the last 25 years, siphoned off into newer, often Pentecostal sects. "
Protestant - mainline world 465,000,000 - - - 1995 *LINK* 1996 Britannica Book of the Year "Protestantism (since 1517): 465 million, plus 276 million not on the main Protestant line. "
Protestant - mainline - welcoming churches (for homosexual community) USA - - 350
units
- 1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); pg. 31-32. "The UMC's [position on] homosexuality reflects the general attitude shared by most mainline denominations: '...we do not condone the practice of homosexuality & consider this practice incompatible with Christian teaching...' [Some churches] have made a commitment to welcome people regardless of their sexuality. There are presently more than 350 individual churches that have voted to become 'welcoming churches' for the lesbian & gay community across the country. In 1992, the 4 oldest welcoming programs became linked in an ecumenical move to publish Open Hands, a... journal of 'resources of ministries affirming the diversity of human sexuality.' Each denomination has a different name for these welcoming programs including: Presbyterian: More Light Churches; UCC/Disciples of Christ: Open & Affirming Congregations; Methodist: Reconciling Cong.; Lutheran: Reconciled in Christ... Brethren & Mennonite: Supportive Congregations; American Baptist: Welcoming & Affirming Churches "
Protestant - Maya Guatemala 83,836 - - - 1975 Scotchmer, David G. "Life of the Heart: A Maya Protestant Spirituality " in South and Meso-American Native Spirituality, ed. by Gary H. Gossen. New York: Crossroad Publishing Co. (1997); pg. 503. "According to Lloret's analysis, more than a third of all Guatemalan Protestants are Maya. Projecting from the 1975 total of 83,836 Maya Protestants with a modest growth of 6% annually, it seems that we can say that today's Maya Indian Protestants probably number between 190,000 & 200,000 active adult members. "
Protestant - missionaries Brazil 3,500 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page: "Brazil, or Saudi Arabia? " by Justin D. Long, 1998 (viewed 5 March 1999) "Brazil has nearly ten times the population of Saudi Arabia... Yet Saudi Arabia has only a handful of people interested in evangelizing it, while more than 7,000 missionaries are at work in Brazil (half of whom are Protestants, and half Catholics). "
Protestant - missionaries world 43,000 - - - 1958 Marty, Martin E. Protestantism (History of Religion Series). New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston (1972); pg. 19. "In 1958, almost 28,000 out of 43,000 Protestant missionaries were from the United States. "
Protestant - missionaries world 50,500 - - - 1988 Diamong, Sara. Not by Politics Alone: The Enduring Influence of the Christian Right. New York: The Guilford Press (1998); pg. 206. "Generally, missions-minded U.S. evangelicals prefer to support native-born converts, who can more easily and inexpensively evangelize their compatriots, rather than putting expensive U.S. mission teams in the field. World Vision, one of the largest of the international mission agencies, has a southern California-based research divisino, the Mission Advanced Research and Communications Center (MARC), which compiles handbooks on worldwide evangelistic efforts and demographic facts about 'unreached people groups,' numbering some five hundred in the 1990s. In terms of numbers of missionaries sent abroad, for both short and long durations,, the top-ranking U.S. groups are Southern Baptist Convention, the Wycliffe Bible Translators, the New Tribes Mission, the Assemblies of God denomination, the Churches of Christ denomination, and Youth with a Mission. Some one hundred groups supported 50,000 missionaries in the field in 1988. "
Protestant - missionaries world - - - - 1992 Diamong, Sara. Not by Politics Alone: The Enduring Influence of the Christian Right. New York: The Guilford Press (1998); pg. 206. "MARC's [Mission Advanced Research and Communications Center] most recent handbook notes that between 1988 and 1992, the total number of missionaries sent by U.S. and Canadian organizations actually decreased, reversing many years' worth of steady growth. However, MARC found increasesin U.S. missions' financial support and training for national workers evangelizing in their home countries, as well as an increase in short-term missionary projects led by nondenominational groups. "
Protestant - missionaries world 180,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Wholesome Words: Worldwide Missions: News and Notes " by Stephen Ross, (Dec. 1998); [original sources: October 15, 1997, Calvary Contender] "Mormons have 55,000 full-time missionaries, and the Jehovah's Witnesses have the equivalent of 270,000). The combined total for the Christian church is only 180,000. "
Protestant - moderate denominations USA - 24.00% - - 1984 Podell, Janet (ed.). Religion in American Life; New York: H. W. Wilson Company (1987); pg. 11. "...moderate Protestants--Methodists, Lutherans, American Baptists, Disciples, and Reformed--24 percent... (These figures are based on a composite sample of over 17,000 Americans from the General Social Surveys, from 1972 to 1984... "
Protestant - moderate denominations USA - 24.00% - - 1994 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 63. "Ask a hundred Americans what they prefer in religion, and twenty-four of them are likely to list membership in denominations cheracterized as 'moderate,' or who will describe themselves as 'moderate Protestant.' "


Protestant - moderate denominations, continued

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