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back to Azerbaijani, Iran

Azerbaijani, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Azerbaijani Iran - 24.00% - - 1999 Lyle, Garry. Iran (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 81-82. "The largest of these [ethnic] groups is the Azerbaijani, who make up 24% of the population. They live in Azerbaijan, in the northwest, and are descended from the Turkish peoples who settled in the area after the 10th century. They speak Azari... are farmers, herders, and traders. They have settled towns and villages centuries and tend to keep to themselves, although they are a stable and prosperous element within Iranian society. "
Azerbaijani Iran: Kurdistan 470,000 12.80% - - 1975 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised 1st American edition). [Original Sources: National Census of Population and Housing, November 1966, Tehran; Monthly Bulletin of Statistics, November 1971, UN, New York.]; pg. 96. "Table 1: The Kurdish Population in Iran "; 1975: Kurds in Iran: 5,514,800; % of Kurds in the Iranian Population: 16.; "Of the people living in Iranian Kurdistan, 12.8% are Azerbaijanis (470,000) and Persians (235,000). On the other hand, there is a tight community of 400,000 Kurds in the Province of Khorassan, notably in Gutshan and Dorgaz. "
Azerbaijani world 40,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 62-64. "Azerbaijanis: Location: Azerbaijan; Iran; Population: 35-40 million worldwide: Republic of Azerbaijan, 7.5 million; Iran, estimated 20 to 25 million; Georgia; Dagestan; Russia; China; Iraq; Germany; Sweden; England; Canada; U.S.; Australia; Language: Azeri; Religion: Islam (majority); Christianity (Orthodox and Evangelical); Judaism "; "Some historians believe that Zoroastrianism... was prevalent in ancient Azerbaijan... It appears that Christianity was popular in the region from the 2nd through 6th centuries... By the end of the 9th century, it is believed that most... were Muslims of the Shi'ite branch... " [NOTE: This statistic is of ethnic/cultural affiliation, not a distinct religion.]
Aztec Latin America - - - - 1531 C.E. Moulton, Kristen (AP). "An education from cradle to college " in Dallas Morning News, 28 Aug. 1999; pg. 3G. "Juan Diego was an Aztec Indian credited with persuading a bishop to build a temple after he witnessed an apparition of the Virgin Mary in 1531. Eight million Aztecs were soon converted to Roman Catholicism. "
Aztec Mexico - - - - 1487 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 2). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 198, 200. "The Aztecs were a group of American Indians speaking Nahuatl, a language of the Siouan family. They came originally from North America but may have been in Mexico for several centuries before they became a powerful tribe. The language was also spoken by the Toltecs, who controlled most of Mexico between 750 and 1000 AD. "; Pg. 200: "When the great temple was dedicated he took 20,000 captives and had them all sacrificed in four days by eight teams of priests. The year was 1487, only five years before Columbus sailed into the West Indies. Ahuitzotle died in 1502... By this time almost all of civilized Mexico was under Aztec domination. "
Aztec Mexico - - - - 1500 C.E. Israel, Fred L. & Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. (editors). Ancient Civilizations of the Aztecs and Mayas (series: 'Cultural and Geographical Exploration: Chronicles from National Geographic). Philadelphia, PA: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. x. "The Aztecs were a native American Indian people who ruled a mighty empire in Mexico during the 1400s and early 1500s A.D. Their empire was conquered by the Spaniards in 1521, but Aztec culture has left a lasting mark on the Mexican way of life. The Aztec empire was established in less than a century. It encompassed the Valley of Mexico, a huge oval basin about 7500 feet above sea level. Although the valley is in the tropics, its high altitude gave it a mild climate. The land was divided into numerous small states. Eventually, the entire area was united under an emperor... The Aztecs were fierce warriors who believed it their duty to sacrifice the people they captured in battle to their gods. On a gentler side, the Aztecs composed music, wrote poetry, and were skilled in medicine. "
Aztec Mexico - 0.00% - - 1999 Israel, Fred L. & Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. (editors). Ancient Civilizations of the Aztecs and Mayas (series: 'Cultural and Geographical Exploration: Chronicles from National Geographic). Philadelphia, PA: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. x-xi. "Little Aztec architecture remains, as the Spanish considered it their Christian duty to wipe out all traces of Aztec religion. They destroyed the capital city and built Mexico City on the ruins. However, archaeologists have excavated the site of the Great Temple in downtown Mexico City, recovering thousands of objects, including jewelry and pottery as well as the remains of human and animal sacrifices. "
Aztec Mexico: Mexico City 100,000 - - - 1519 C.E. Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 166. "When Hernando Cortez and his men reached the Valley of Mexico in 1519 they were amazed to see the massive Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan, looming ahead. Their discovery was soon to spell the doom of this mighty civilization. In a few short months this large urban center of some 100,000, with its towering stone temples and magnificent palaces, had been successfully besieged and burned. "
Aztec Mexico: Mexico City 300,000 - - - 1520 C.E. Israel, Fred L. & Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. (editors). Ancient Civilizations of the Aztecs and Mayas (series: 'Cultural and Geographical Exploration: Chronicles from National Geographic). Philadelphia, PA: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. x-xi. "Religion was extremely important in Aztec life. They were terrified by the forces of nature, which they could not understand. The Aztec worshipped many gods and goddesses, each of whom ruled one or more human activities or aspects of nature. There were several hundred religious festivals held each year to appease the gods... When the Spanish arrived in Tenochtitlan, the Aztec capital [now Mexico City], they were impressed by the beauty, order, and cleanliness of this city of 150,000 - 300,000 inhabitants. Its size ranked it as one of the largest metropolises in the world at the time. This favorable impression vanished when they reached the great ceremonial center. The immense enclosure contained several dozen temples, the largest being the Great Temple. The Spaniards were shocked by the blood-soaked steps and the terrible smell. In fact, the inauguration of the Great Temple in 1487 was celebrated with splendid festivals where thousands of victims were sacrificed in four days. "
Aztec world 2,000,000 - - - 1519 C.E. Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. 174. "At the time of the conquest the Aztecs and their subject peoples in the Central Valley of Mexico numbered about two million, mostly gathered in large urban centers. "
B'nai Shalom USA - - 8
units
- 1971 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 292. "In the early 1970s, there were 8 congregations in the U.S... "
B'nai Shalom world 1,000 - 19
units
- 1971 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Other Pentecostals; pg. 292. "B'nai Shalom... During the 1950s, Elder Reynolds Edward Dawkin, an el elder in the Gospel Assemblies (Sowder), had several visions... Membership has spread to Jamaica, the Netherlands, Hong Kong, India, Nigeria and Israel... Membership: Not reported. In the early 1970s, there were 8 congregations in the United States and 11 outside, with a total membership of approximately 1,000. "
Baba Ram Das USA - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 320. "It was perhaps inevitable that Hindu missionary activity would produce an indigenous American Hinduism. Theosophy may have been the precursor of recent movements lead by Baba ram Das (born as Gordon Alpert) who, along with Timothy Leary, was once a professor psychology at Harvard... "
Babi-Baha'ism Iran 1,000,000 - - - 1892 Petersen, William J. Those Curious New Cults in the 80s. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing (1982); pg. 200. "In 1892, Persia (now Iran) had between five hundred thousand a million Bahais and other Babi's. But since that time the movement has not grown in that land but rather has shrunk, led by numerous schisms and rifts. " [The term "Babi-Baha'ism " refers to the entire Babi-Baha'i movement, as distinct from strictly the Baha'i Faith, the religious body with headquarters in Haifa.]
Babism Iran 19 - - - 1844 Hatcher, William S. & J. Douglas Martin. The Baha'i Faith: The Emerging Global Religion. San Francisco, CA: Harper & Row (1984); pg. 6-7. "...1844... The charm and force of the Bab's personality... prompted Mulla Husayn to declare his faith. He became the first believer of the Babi Faith. Within a few weeks, 17 other seekers accepted the Bab's claim to be the promised messenger. He appointed these first 18 believers as the 'Letters of the Living,' and dispatched them throughout Iran... "
Babism Iran - - - - 1844 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 454. "The Bahai Faith developed from the Persian sect of Babism begun in 1844 by Siyyid Ali Muhammad (1819-50)? "
Babism Iran - - - - 1844 Stack, Peggy Fletcher. A World of Faith. USA: Signature Books (1998); pg. 3. "Baha'is. In 1844 a man called the Bab, which means 'gate,' announced to the people of Persia (now Iran) that a messenger of God was coming soon. "
Babism world 19 - - 1
country
1844 Hatcher, William S. & J. Douglas Martin. The Baha'i Faith: The Emerging Global Religion. San Francisco, CA: Harper & Row (1984); pg. 6-7. "...1844... The charm and force of the Bab's personality... prompted Mulla Husayn to declare his faith. He became the first believer of the Babi Faith. Within a few weeks, 17 other seekers accepted the Bab's claim to be the promised messenger. He appointed these first 18 believers as the 'Letters of the Living,' and dispatched them throughout Iran... "
Babylonian California - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 74. "Centre of The Divine Ishtar, P.O. Box 9494, San Jose, CA 95157. Local (northern California-South SF Bay) Goddess worship fellowship with traditional eclectic/Wiccan focus; mixed genders; members of many traditions (Dianic, Gardnerian, Celtic, Eclectic, Qabalist, Santera, Culdee, etc.) "
Babylonian world - - - - 250 C.E. Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 13. "Babylon: The country between the rivers Tigris and Euphrates, now Iraq, to which the Jews were exiled by Nebuchadnezzar after the destruction of the First Temple and by the rivers of which the exiles refused to sing 'the Lord's song in a strange land' (Psalms 137).

Under the early third-century teachers Rav and Samuel, Babylon became a center for Jewish learning, a keen rivalry existing between the Babylonian and Palestinian scholars. The Babylonian Talmud became more authoritative than the Palestinian under the influence of the Geonim, who looked upon themselves as the heirs of the Talmudic sages. "

Badawiyya Egypt - - - - 1500 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 723. "Other regionally based orders, such as the Badawiyya, named after the Egyptian saint Ahmad al-Badawi (d. 1276), were not as conscious of their classical roots, though they too maintained geneaologies that linked them to the first generation of Muslims... "
Badawiyya Egypt - - - - 1700 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 722. "The time of greatest influence for the Sufi orders... Ottoman and Mogul empires... 1500-1800. The number of Muslims affiliated with Sufi brotherhoods during this period was certainly not less than half the population and may have been as high as 80 percent... regional orders, such as the Badawiyya and Shadhiliyaa (both derived from the Rifa'iya) helped to intensify loyalties in Egypt and the Magrib. "
Baganda Uganda 1,000,000 - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 24-27. "Baganda: Population: 1,000,000; Location: Uganda; Language: Luganda, English "; Pg. 26: "Today the Baganda make up 20 percent of the Uganda population and are divided into 36 clans, each named for an animal or plant. "; Pg. 27: "Religion has traditionally held great importance for the Baganda. As a result of their experience with British rule, the majority have adopted Christian beliefs. Some 15% are Muslim. Like many other African peoples, the Baganda originally worshipped the spirits of their ancestors as well as gods important to both the entire Baganda culture and to particular clans. Some Baganda still hold to those beliefs, along with newer Christian or Muslim ones. "
Baganda Uganda 3,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 35, 37. "Baganda: Alternate Names: The King's Men; Location: Uganda; Population: About 3 million; Religion: Christianity (Protestantism and Roman Catholicism); Islam "; Pg. 37: "The majority of present-day Baganda are Christian, about evenly divided between Catholic and Protestant. Approximately 15% are Muslim... Contemporary Baganda are considered to be extremely religious, whatever their faith, although the Balubaale cult no longer exists. " [3 million is measure of tribal affiliation, NOT a distinct faith group, because Baganda no longer practice traditional Baganda religion.]
Baggara world 5,000,000 - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 29, 32. "Baggara: Population: 5,000,000; Location: Sudan and Chad between the Nile River and Lake Chad; Language: Arabic "; Pg. 32: "The Baggara today live much as their ancestors did, remaining a nomadic people who are continually searching for new grazing land... Family and personal lives are governed by the Islamic faith and local customs. "
Baghdadi Jews India 6,500 - - - 1945 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 194. "Jews from Arab lands, called 'Baghdadis' after the city many of them came from in the nineteenth century... There were 6,500 Baghdadis in India in the mid-1940s (including refugees from Burma), mostly in Bombay and Calcutta. Few remain. Wealthier Baghdadis tended to migrate to England, Canada, and other English speaking countries rather than Israel. "
Baghdadi Jews India - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2081. "The Baghdadi [Jews], who live in the cities of Bombay, Calcutta and Poona, emigrated from Baghdad and other Middle Eastern areas in the 19th century. "
Baghdadi Jews India - - 5
units
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 206. "Nine synagogues still function in Bombay, although the two Baghdadi ones have to pay Bene Israel to help form a daily minyan. In Poona, too, two synagogues remain open: one Bene Israel and the other Baghdadi. Bene Israel synagogues survive in Ahmedabad and Delhi, a Baghdadi synagogue in Calcutta, and the oldest of all Indian synagogues in Cochin... "
Baghdadi Jews India: Bombay - - 2
units
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 205. "Nine synagogues still function in Bombay, although the two Baghdadi ones have to pay Bene Israel to help form a daily minyan.
Baghdadi Jews India: Poona - - 1
unit
- 1982 Ross, Dan. Acts of Faith: A Journey to the Fringes of Jewish Identity. New York: St. Martin's Press (1982); pg. 205-206. "In Poona, too, two synagogues remain open: one Bene Israel and the other Baghdadi. "
Bagisu Uganda - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Baha'is Under the Provisions of the Covenant world 144,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Toronto Consultants on Religious Tolerance "; web page: "Baha'i Faith " "Baha'is Under the Provisions of the Covenant who recognized Mason Remey as the Guardian who succeeded Shoghi Effendi. They have organized a series of International Baha'i Councils (IBC). They claim a membership approaching 144,000. Their Baha'i Center is located in Missoula, MT. " [This number is widely regarded as "figurative. " The actual figure was probably no more than 1% of this.]
Bahai Faith Afghanistan 19,500 - - - 1990 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani
Bahai Faith Afghanistan 23,075 0.09% - - 2000 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Percent: Bahai pop./country pop. from PRB (http://www.prb.org): 26,668,000
Bahai Faith Africa 236,987 - - - 1973 MacEoin, Denis. "Baha'ism " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. source: Hampson, A. "The Growth and Spread of the Baha'i Faith "]; pg. 492. "Table 13.1: Statistics on Baha'ism "; "Estimated number of adherents (1973) "
Bahai Faith Africa 1,382,692 - - - 1990 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Regions from PRB (http://www.prb.org)
Bahai Faith Africa - - 4,828
units
- 1994 The Baha'is. Leicestershire, United Kingdom: Baha'i Publishing Trust of the U.K. (1994; 1st ed. 1992); pg. 7. Table: Statistics of the Baha'i world community "; Figures taken from column: "Local Spiritual Assemblies "; Five locations listed: Africa, Americas, Australiasia [Oceania], Asia, Europe
Bahai Faith Africa 1,851,000 0.25% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
Bahai Faith Africa 1,923,000 0.26% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Bahai Faith Africa 1,000,000 - - - 1997 Breuilly, Elizabeth, Joanne O'Brien and Martin Palmer. Religions of the World: The Illustrated Guide to Origins, Beliefs, Traditions & Festivals. Facts on File Inc.: New York, NY (1997); pg. 10 to 11. "There are 5 million Baha'is worldwide in more than 175 countries, with the largest concentrations in Africa (about 1 million) and the USA (about 300,000). "
Bahai Faith Africa 2,263,000 0.29% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Bahai Faith Africa 1,731,890 0.22% - - 2000 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Regions and total pop. figures from PRB (http://www.prb.org)
Bahai Faith Africa - East 702,980 - - - 1990 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Regions from PRB (http://www.prb.org)
Bahai Faith Africa - East 831,812 0.33% - - 2000 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Regions and total pop. figures from PRB (http://www.prb.org)
Bahai Faith Africa - Middle 295,850 - - - 1990 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Regions from PRB (http://www.prb.org)
Bahai Faith Africa - Middle 401,546 0.42% - - 2000 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Regions and total pop. figures from PRB (http://www.prb.org)
Bahai Faith Africa - North 34,050 - - - 1990 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Regions from PRB (http://www.prb.org)
Bahai Faith Africa - North 41,711 0.02% - - 2000 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Regions and total pop. figures from PRB (http://www.prb.org)
Bahai Faith Africa - South 233,300 - - - 1990 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Regions from PRB (http://www.prb.org)
Bahai Faith Africa - South 300,634 0.60% - - 2000 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Regions and total pop. figures from PRB (http://www.prb.org)
Bahai Faith Africa - West 116,512 - - - 1990 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Regions from PRB (http://www.prb.org)
Bahai Faith Africa - West 156,187 0.07% - - 2000 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Regions and total pop. figures from PRB (http://www.prb.org)
Bahai Faith Albania 2,000 - - - 1990 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani
Bahai Faith Albania 5,711 0.17% - - 2000 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Percent: Bahai pop./country pop. from PRB (http://www.prb.org): 3,431,000
Bahai Faith Algeria 2,000 - - - 1990 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani
Bahai Faith Algeria 2,806 0.01% - - 2000 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Percent: Bahai pop./country pop. from PRB (http://www.prb.org): 31,471,000
Bahai Faith Andorra 60 - - - 1990 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani
Bahai Faith Andorra 110 0.16% - - 2000 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Percent: Bahai pop./country pop. from PRB (http://www.prb.org): 67,000
Bahai Faith Angola 1,000 - - - 1990 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani
Bahai Faith Angola 1,488 0.01% - - 2000 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Percent: Bahai pop./country pop. from PRB (http://www.prb.org): 12,878,000
Bahai Faith Anguilla 70 - - - 1990 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani
Bahai Faith Anguilla 86 0.73% - - 2000 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Percent: Bahai pop./country pop. from PRB (http://www.prb.org): 11,800
Bahai Faith Antarctica 0 0.00% - - 1990 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani
Bahai Faith Antarctica 0 0.00% - - 2000 Barrett, David B. World Christian Encyclopedia (2001) Data transcribed by Simeon Kohlman Rabbani. Percent: Bahai pop./country pop. from PRB (http://www.prb.org): 5,000
Bahai Faith Antigua - 1.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Nazarene web site: Nazarene World Mission Society; (major source: Johnstone's Operation World) Table "Religions "


Bahai Faith, continued

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