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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Pharisees, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Pharisees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 567. "Pharisees. Jewish religious party of the Second Temple period... Josephus attributes specific religious beliefs to them... A more detailed picture of the Pharisees, however, emerges from sources later than 70 A.D., and much controversy today surrounds their characterization during the Second Temple period. The NT references are especially derogatory and do not provide an accurate picture. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996), Chapter: Judaism; pg. 264. "Pharisees: Sect that created the oral law to apply Mosaic law to contemporary situations. Modern Jews are descended from the Pharisees in the sense that the other sects died out after the destruction of the Second Temple. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 70 C.E. Oxtoby, Willard G. The Meaning of Other Faiths. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press (1983); pg. 25. "A second option saw the essence of Judaism as the observances one could carry out within the four walls of one's own home... This position... was the emphasis of the Pharisees, and it survived the destruction of the Temple and public institution. In fact, it became the mainstream of rabbinic Judaism and has characterized the practice of Judaism wherever it has been a minority community until our own times. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 100 C.E. Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 178. "Pharisees: One of the three sects mentioned by Josephus as having flourished from the second century BCE to the early second century CE, the other two being the Sadducees and the Essenes. There is considerable uncertainty about the meaning of the term... According to both Josephus and the Talmud the two main theological differences between the Pharisees and the Sadducees were: the Pharisaic belief that Israel was given by God an Oral Torah, and the Pharisiac belief in the reality of the World to Come. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 500 C.E. Oxtoby, Willard G. The Meaning of Other Faiths. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press (1983); pg. 43. "The tradition of the Pharisees survived the Jewish war against Rome in the first century to become the basis of rabbinic law interpretation in the Talmud in the second through the sixth century. "
Pharisees world - - - - -50 B.C.E. *LINK* web site: "Karaite Korner "; web page: "History of Karaism " (viewed 14 March 1999). Copyright 1998-1999 by Nehemia Gordon and Devorah Gordon. "The first reference in the history of Israel to more than one sect takes place some 200 years after the close of the Biblical period, in the first century BCE. Various sources tell us of two opposing sects, the Sadducees (Zadokites) and the Pharisees. The Sadducees followed the Torah as it was written while the Pharisees believed in a second 'Oral' Torah which they added to the real one. "
Pharisees world - - - - 650 C.E. *LINK* web site: "Karaite Korner "; web page: "History of Karaism " (viewed 14 March 1999). Copyright 1998-1999 by Nehemia Gordon and Devorah Gordon. "In early middle ages the Pharisees continued to thrive... began to call themselves Rabbis & only used the name Pharisees [when speaking historically]. In 7th century the Islamic Empire swept the Middle-east [but] had no interest in imposing Islamic religious practice on the Jews & gave them a degree of autonomy under a system known as the Exilarchate. Exilarchate had been founded hundreds of years before... but until now only had influence in Babylonia & Persia. Overnight the Rabbanites turned from a localized Babylonian phenomenon into a political power which stretched throughout much of the Middle-east. "
Philadelphia Baptist Association Pennsylvania: Philadelphia - - 5
units
- 1707 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 83. "By 1707 there were five Baptist churches in the Philadelphia area... the pastors and members of these five churches organized the Philadelphia Baptist Association. "
Philadelphia Baptist Association USA 4,000 - 29
units
- 1762 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 96. "By 1762, the Philadelphia Baptist Association had grown to 29 churches with more than 4,000 members, chiefly in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York. Following the pattern set by this first co-operating group of Baptist churches, other groups formed themselves into associations for united efforts and mutual benefit. "
Philadelphia Baptist Association world - - 5
units
1
country
1707 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 83. "By 1707 there were five Baptist churches in the Philadelphia area... the pastors and members of these five churches organized the Philadelphia Baptist Association. "
Philadelphia Baptist Association world 4,000 - 29
units
1
country
1762 Armstrong, O.K. & Marjorie Armstrong. The Baptists in America. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1979) [revised 2nd edition; originally published in 1967 under the title The Indomitable Baptists]; pg. 96. "By 1762, the Philadelphia Baptist Association had grown to 29 churches with more than 4,000 members, chiefly in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York. Following the pattern set by this first co-operating group of Baptist churches, other groups formed themselves into associations for united efforts and mutual benefit. "
Philadelphia Church of God Pennsylvania - - - - 1987 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance; webpage: "Worldwide Church of God founded by Herbert W. Armstrong " (viewed 23 April 2005) Latest update: 2004-SEP-06; Author: B.A. Robinson "Worldwide Church of God... Splinter groups: After Herbert Armstrong's death [1986], about 30,000 members of the Worldwide Church of God left to join splinter groups: Church of God International, Global Church of God, Living Church of God, Philadelphia Church of God, and United Church of God. "
Philadelphia Church of God Pennsylvania - - - - 2005 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance; webpage: "Worldwide Church of God founded by Herbert W. Armstrong " (viewed 23 April 2005) Latest update: 2004-SEP-06; Author: B.A. Robinson "Worldwide Church of God... Splinter groups: After Herbert Armstrong's death [1986], about 30,000 members of the Worldwide Church of God left to join splinter groups: Church of God International, Global Church of God, Living Church of God, Philadelphia Church of God, and United Church of God... The most successful of the splinter groups appears to be the Philadelphia Church of God. Founded by Gerald Flurry... They broadcast a television program, The Key of David. They publish The Philadelphia Trumpet newsletter.
Philadelphia Church of God world - - - - 1987 web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance; webpage: "Anglo-Israelism; British Israelism; Worldwide Church of God "; URL: http://www.religioustolerance.org/anglo_is.htm (viewed 1 May 1999) [NOTE: Statistics and most info pertaining to Worldwide Church of God were subsequently removed from this page after the denomination renounced British Israelism] "The Worldwide Church of God... Their membership peaked in 1986 at the death of Herbert Armstrong with about 150,000 members worldwide. 1996 attendance is approximately half that. In the US, membership slid from 89,000 to 49,000. About 30,000 have left to join splinter groups: United Church of God, Global Church of God, Philadelphia Church of God and Church of God International. "
Philadelphia Church of God world 3,000 - - - 1989 *LINK* official website of Worldwide Church of God; webpage: "A Brief History of the Worldwide Church of God " (viewed 23 April 2005) "In 1986, shortly before he died, Herbert Armstrong appointed Joseph Tkach (pronounced Ta-cotch) to be his successor... In 1988, Tkach made minor doctrinal changes... Questions also arose about some of the things that Armstrong had written, and some of his books were withdrawn from circulation until further study could resolve the questions. Some members were troubled that the church was no longer teaching the same things that Armstrong had, and in 1989, 3,000 members left to form the Philadelphia Church of God to preserve Armstrong doctrines. "
Philadelphia Church of God world 6,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* OPPOSING VIEW (anti-) web site: "Ministry of Healing: Recovering from Abusive Religion "; section: "FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999) -
Philadelphian Society world - - - - 1710 Deghaye, Pierre. "Jacob Boehme and His Followers " in Modern Esoteric Spirituality (vol. 21 of "World Spirituality: An Encyclopedic History of the Religious Quest "), edited by Antoine Faivre and Jacob Needleman. New York, NY: Crossroad (1992); pg. 243. "The small brotherhood of which Pordage was the head expanded to become the Philadelphian Society. The heart of the society was Jane Lead (1623-1704)... The Philadelphian Society ceased to exist after the death of Lead. The branches of the society established in Germany and Holland did not survive long thereafter. In the eyes of Lead, this brotherhood represented a new church... "
Philippines Benevolent Missionaries Association Philippines: Ilocos Norte 415 0.09% - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "Province of Ilocos Norte Home Page " "Table 3: HOUSEHOLD POPULATION BY RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION IN ILOCOS NORTE 1990 "; "Ilocos Norte had a pop. of 461,661 in 1990 " [table lists # of households & percentage. Adherent numbers here are based on % of total pop.]
Philistine Palestine - - - - -1100 B.C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "PHILISTINES: known as 'the Sea People.' They appear to have settled in PALESTINE where they established a flourishing culture around the twelfth century B.C. In the HEBREW BIBLE they are depicted as a cruel people and hostile to the JEWS. "
Phoenician Africa - North - - - - -814 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2184. "Carthage, which was destined to become Rome's great rival in the Mediterranean world, was traditionally founded in 814 BC by colonists from Tyre; it was one of many Phoenician settlements on the western Mediterranean coasts. Its position, in command of the straits between North Africa and Sicily, was one of great strategic opportunity, which it exploited to build up a commercial empire. Carthage steadily outgrew the mother city in size and importance... The Phoenician colonists took their native religion with them to North Africa, and it formed the fundamental pattern of Carthaginian religion. "
Phoenician world - - - - -2000 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2180. "According to Greek writers, the Phoenicians had originally lived in the Persian Gulf area, but had migrated westwards at a remote period and settled on the Mediterranean coast. This account of their origins has not been confirmed by modern archeology. There is, indeed, much evidence of migrations of Semitic peoples from Arabia and the Persian Gulf into Syria and Palestine during the third and second millennia BC. But it would appear also that Semites were living in this area from at least the third millennium, and they cannot be distinguished from any 'Canaanite invaders'. We have, therefore, to consider the Phoenicians as Canaanites, that is, as Semitic inhabitants of the coastal area of the eastern Mediterranean. "
Phoenician world - - - - -1200 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2180. "The term [Phoenicians] may also be used in a special sense after about 1200 BC, for as a result of the settlement of the Israelites and Philistines about this time in the district later known as Palestine, the area of Canaanite political independence became limited approximately to the territory occupied by the four chief Phoenician cities of Tyre, Sidon, Byblos and Aradus. Since the Phoenicians were Canaanites, the earlier form of their religion can now be studied from the ritual and mythological texts discovered since 1928 by excavation of the Canaanite city of Ugarit, close to the modern Ras Shamra. The Ugaritic texts reveal that the Canaanites of the 15th and 14th centuries BC worshipped a number of gods. The presiding deity was El, described as 'the Father of Men', who was regarded as benevolent and merciful... depicted... as a bearded man, seated on a throne... "
Phoenician world - - - - -350 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2184. "Among other Phoenician gods worshipped at Carthage were Eshmun of Sidon and Reshef. The cult of the Greek goddesses Demeter and Persephone was introduced in the 4th century BC, and after the Roman conquest the Punic deities were generally identified with the Roman deities deemed to be equivalent in character and status. The grim fanaticism that characterized both Phoenician and Carthaginian religion has been thought by some scholars to have left its impress upon ancient African Christianity. "
Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy USA - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 37. "An offshoot created by an American disciple of Yogi Desai [founder of Kripalu Yoga], which uses the postures as a kind of therapeutic device, is called Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapy. "
Pian Uganda - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Pietism Europe - - - - 1727 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 567. "Pietism... In its stricter definition Pietism centers around the renewal activities of Philipp Jakob Spener... and August Hermann Francke (1663-1727), both Lutherans. In its broader sense, Pietism incorporates, first, prior reform currents within the Geramn Reformed; second, links to English Puritanism, Dutch Precisianism, and French Quietism; and third, later contacts with Wesleyanism. "
Pietism Germany - - - - 1670 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2191. "Pietism: Generally, a religious attitude which stresses emotion and behaviour rather than intellect, a tendancy to regard depth of feeling and personal devotion as more important than creeds and doctrines: specifically, a movement organized by Philipp Jakob Spener, a German Lutheran, from c1670, often derided for what was regardes as its excessive and affected piety. "
Pietism Germany - - - - 1705 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 567. "Pietism. A reform movement in late seventeenth and eighteenth century German Protestantism... In its stricter definition Pietism centers around the renewal activities of Philipp Jakob Spener (1635-1705) and August Hermann Francke (1663-1727), both Lutherans. "
Pietism world - - - - 1700 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 390. "Pietism: Although not widely known today because it was more of a movement than an established church, Pietism had a continuing influence on Christian spirituality. In the 17th and 18th centuries, Pietists, led by Philipp Jakob Spener (1635-1705), reacted against the growing rigidity and systematization of the Reformation, emphasizing good works and knowledge of the Bible. "
Pilgermission St. Chrischona: Evangelische Stadtmissionen Germany 9,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Pilgermission St. Chrischona: Evangelische Stadtmissionen " in table. Source: REMID.
Pilgrim Holiness Church of New York Canada 275 - 5
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Glenn Griffith Movement; pg. 227. "Pilgrim Holiness Church of New York... Membership: In 1988 the Church reported... 275 members, 5 churches and 5 ministers in Canada. "
Pilgrim Holiness Church of New York North America 1,225 - 59
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Glenn Griffith Movement; pg. 227. "Pilgrim Holiness Church of New York... Membership: In 1988 the Church reported 950 members, 54 churches, and 87 ministers in the U.S. and 275 members, 5 churches and 5 ministers in Canada. "
Pilgrim Holiness Church of New York USA 950 - 54
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Glenn Griffith Movement; pg. 227. "Pilgrim Holiness Church of New York... Membership: In 1988 the Church reported 950 members, 54 churches, and 87 ministers in the U.S... "
Pilgrim Holiness Church of New York world - - - 4
countries
1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Glenn Griffith Movement; pg. 227. "Pilgrim Holiness Church of New York... Albany, NY [H.Q.]... Missions are directly supported in Brazil, Haiti, and Winnepeg, Manitoba, Canada, and other locations through various missionary agencies. Churches are located in New York, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and Canada. Membership: In 1988 the Church reported 950 members, 54 churches, and 87 ministers in the U.S. and 275 members, 5 churches and 5 ministers in Canada. "
Pilgrim Holiness Church of the Midwest world 246 - 13
units
- 1967 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: Glenn Griffith Movement; pg. 228. "Pilgrim Holiness Church of the Midwest... Westfield, IN [H.Q.]... was formed in 1970. Three years earlier 10 congregations affiliated with the Pilgrim Holiness Church had withdrawn to become the Midwest Conference of the Pilgrim Holiness Church of New York. But the ten congregations eventually decided to remain independent, though they stayed friendly with the New York group. They adopted their own Discipline (a book of church order)... Membership: Not reported. In 1969 there were 13 churches and 246 members. "
Pillar and Ground of Truth world 4,800 - 119
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 175. "Churches of the Living God: Two Negro sects growing out of a group organized by William Christian at Wrightsville, Ark., in 1889... 'The Pillar and Ground of Truth' has 119 churches and 4,800 members. "
Pillar of Fire USA 4,000 - 46
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 341. Table: "...the leading holiness groups in the United States at the present time are as follows: " [Table lists figures for "Churches " and "Members " for 28 groups.]
Pillar of Fire USA - - 20
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 20th Century Holiness; pg. 220. "Pillar of Fire... Membership is not counted and is unknown. In 1988 there were 20 congregations in the U.S. and 56 in foreign countries... "
Pillar of Fire world 4,000 - 46
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 585. "Pillar Fire: A holiness sect with headquarters at Zarepath, N.J. It was first organized as the Pentecostal Union in Colorado in 1901 and took its present name in 1917... There are 46 churches and 4,000 members. "
Pillar of Fire world - - 76
units
9
countries
1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Holiness Family; section: 20th Century Holiness; pg. 220. "Pillar of Fire; Zarephath, NJ [H.Q.]... Membership is not counted and is unknown. In 1988 there were 20 congregations in the U.S. and 56 in foreign countries, including Great Britain, India, Liberia, Malawi, Nigeria, the Philippines, Spain and Yugoslavia. "
Pillar of Fire world - - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 193-194. "In Denver there are a college, preparatory school, Bible seminary, radio station, and publishing house. Other schools are located in Cincinnati; Zarephath; Los Angeles; Jacksonville, Florida; Pacifica, near San Francisco; Seattle; Liberia, in Africa; and London... Mission work is carried on in several African countries, Spain, India, Great Britain, and the Philippines. "
Pillar of Fire world - - - 8
countries
1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 111. "She was ordained as Bishop and her work spread to many states, to England and since her decease to Liberia (West Africa) Malawi (East Africa) Yugoslavia, Spain, India, and the Philippines. "
Pima North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 4,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Pima USA 14,431 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Pima USA 14,431 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Pima world 4,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Piro Pueblos North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 9,000 - - - 1550 C.E. Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Date given as "16th. Century "
Piro Pueblos world 9,000 - - - 1550 C.E. Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Date given as "16th. Century "
PL Kyodan Argentina - - 6
units
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "South America PL Church Directory " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted listings on directory: "Buenos Aires Central, H. Yrigoyen 2532/38, (1090) Buenos Aires; Palermo; Liniers; Lanus; Posadas; Mar Del Plata "
PL Kyodan Australia - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "PL Church Directory in Europe and Oceania " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted churches listed on directory. "Brisbane, Australia; 76 Dairy Swamp Road, Belmont, Qld 4153 Australia "
PL Kyodan Brazil - - 15
units
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "South America PL Church Directory " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted listings on directory: "Main Church, Rua Pirapitingui 204, Liberdade, Sao Paulo, CEP; Manaus-AM; Belem-PA; Fortaleza-CE; Natal-RN; Recife-PE; Salvador-BA; Campo Grande-MS; Brasilia-DF; Goiania-GO; Belo Horizonte-MG; Rio de Janeiro-RJ; Sao Paulo-SP; Curitiba-PR; Porto Alegre-RS "
PL Kyodan California - - 6
units
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "North American Church Directory Menu " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted listings in directory: Los Angeles Area: Glendale, Torrance; San Francisco Bay Area: San Francisco; Oakland (Hayward, Sunnyvale, Palo Alto)
PL Kyodan California: Los Angeles - - 2
units
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "North American Church Directory Menu " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted listings in directory: Los Angeles Area: Glendale, Torrance
PL Kyodan California: Oakland - - 3
units
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "North American Church Directory Menu " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted listings in directory: San Francisco Bay Area: San Francisco; Oakland (Hayward, Sunnyvale, Palo Alto)
PL Kyodan California: San Francisco - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "North American Church Directory Menu " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted listings in directory: San Francisco Bay Area: San Francisco; Oakland (Hayward, Sunnyvale, Palo Alto)
PL Kyodan Canada - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "North American Church Directory Menu " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted listings in directory: "Ottawa Church, 999 Arnot Rd., Ottawa, ONT K2C OH5 " [1 church in Canada region.]
PL Kyodan Europe - - 2
units
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "PL Church Directory in Europe and Oceania " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted churches listed on directory. 2 in Europe: Paris, France & Lisbon, Portugal.
PL Kyodan France - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "PL Church Directory in Europe and Oceania " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted churches listed on directory. "Paris, France; 86 Rue Lafayette 75009 Paris France "
PL Kyodan Hawaii - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "North American Church Directory Menu " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted listings in directory: Pacific Islands: "Hawaii Church; 2258 Nuuanu Ave., Honolulu, HI 96817 "
PL Kyodan Japan 2,658,872 2.31% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " PL (Perfect Liberty) Kyodan classified as "other " new religion; origin yr: 1924.
PL Kyodan Japan - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 572. "At the time of the founding of PL Kyodan in 1946, the headquarters were set up in Kyushu, the southernmost island of Japan. After two other temporary relocations the headquarters (Daihoncho) were established at Tondabayashi, near Osaka... Miki Tokuchika... presides authoritatively over an extensive membership in Japan and abroad by means of a complex network of regional and local agencies... One of the most spectacular festivals in Japan is the PL Founder's Festival, held at Tondabayashi each August 1... features a three-hour display of fireworks, synchronized with symphonic music and the dancing waters of illuminated fountains. "
PL Kyodan Japan - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "Perfect Liberty Kyodan, founded by Miki Tokuharu in 1926, combines elements of Shinto and Buddhism. It worships 'the Supreme Spirit of the universe' but also stresses the role of ancestral spirits as part of one's karma. In stressing Life is Art, Perfect Liberty Kyodan draws upon the Buddhist teaching of non-self, by which what is truly authentic in a person comes to spontaneous expression. "
PL Kyodan Japan - - 464
units
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; home page " (viewed 11 April 1999). "Originally founded as an order in Japan in 1924, this new faith has had a rise in membership that has been phenomenal. Today PL has over 500 churches in ten different countries with more than one million of members. " [Church Directory linked to to this site lists 36 churches outside of Japan: 10 in North America, 23 in South America, 1 in Oceania, and 2 in Europe. 500 - 36 = 464.]
PL Kyodan Louisiana - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "North American Church Directory Menu " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted listings in directory: South Region: "New Orleans Branch, 1021 Felicity St., New Orleans, LA 70130 "
PL Kyodan New York - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* Official web site of PL Kyodan; web page: "North American Church Directory Menu " (viewed 11 April 1999). Counted listings in directory: "New York Church; 37-56 76th St., Jackson Hts., NY 1137 " [1 church in East Region.]


PL Kyodan, continued

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