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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Pentecostal Holiness Church, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Pentecostal Holiness Church Nova Scotia - - 8
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site counted listings in directory
Pentecostal Holiness Church Ohio 1,379 0.01% 11
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 1,099. [Listed as 'Pentecostal Holiness Church, Inc..']
Pentecostal Holiness Church Oklahoma 16,754 0.53% 142
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 13,248. [Listed as 'Pentecostal Holiness Church, Inc..']
Pentecostal Holiness Church Ontario - - 13
units
- 1998 *LINK* official web site counted listings in directory
Pentecostal Holiness Church Oregon 300 0.01% 5
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 240. [Listed as 'Pentecostal Holiness Church, Inc..']
Pentecostal Holiness Church Pennsylvania 1,016 0.01% 12
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 836. [Listed as 'Pentecostal Holiness Church, Inc..']
Pentecostal Holiness Church South Carolina 25,112 0.72% 242
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 19,881. [Listed as 'Pentecostal Holiness Church, Inc..']
Pentecostal Holiness Church Tennessee 2,002 0.04% 25
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 1,601. [Listed as 'Pentecostal Holiness Church, Inc..']
Pentecostal Holiness Church Texas 5,517 0.03% 90
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 4,221. [Listed as 'Pentecostal Holiness Church, Inc..']
Pentecostal Holiness Church Texas 4,221 0.02% - - 1990 Ramos, Mary G. (ed). 1996-1997 Texas Almanac. Dallas, TX: Dallas Morning News (1995). [Source: Glenmary: "Churches & Church Membership in the U.S., 1990 "]; pg. 325-327. Table: "Religious Groups, Members/Adherents, In Texas, 1990 "; pg. 7: Texas pop. (1990 U.S. census): 16,986,335; "Data based on reports from 133 church bodies. "; This figure is from MEMBERS column ( "Members " in this study includes only communicant, confirmed members with full membership status), not the more inclusive "adherents " column.
Pentecostal Holiness Church Texas 5,517 0.03% - - 1990 Ramos, Mary G. (ed). 1996-1997 Texas Almanac. Dallas, TX: Dallas Morning News (1995). [Source: Glenmary: "Churches & Church Membership in the U.S., 1990 "]; pg. 325-327. Table: "Religious Groups, Members/Adherents, In Texas, 1990 "; pg. 7: Texas pop. (1990 U.S. census): 16,986,335; "Data based on reports from 133 church bodies. "; This figure is from ADHERENT column ( "Adherents " defined as all members, incl. regular participants not considered as communicant.), not the more restrictive "member " column.
Pentecostal Holiness Church USA 13,000 - 375
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 573. "The pentecostal sects in the United States have approx. 5,650 local congregations and 350,000 members... largest are the... Pentecostal Holiness Church (375 churche; 13,000 members)... "
Pentecostal Holiness Church USA 40,000 - - - 1950 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 183. "during the 1950s... the Pentecostal Holiness Church grew from little more than 40,000 members to nearly 60,000 members, an increase of almost 50%. "
Pentecostal Holiness Church USA 60,000 - - - 1960 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 183. "during the 1950s... the Pentecostal Holiness Church grew from little more than 40,000 members to nearly 60,000 members, an increase of almost 50%. "
Pentecostal Holiness Church USA 157,728 - 1,490
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Pentecostal Holiness Church, Inc..']
Pentecostal Holiness Church Vermont 6 0.00% 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 05. [Listed as 'Pentecostal Holiness Church, Inc..']
Pentecostal Holiness Church Virginia 19,041 0.31% 171
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 15,647. [Listed as 'Pentecostal Holiness Church, Inc..']
Pentecostal Holiness Church Washington 902 0.02% 17
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 687. [Listed as 'Pentecostal Holiness Church, Inc..']
Pentecostal Holiness Church West Virginia 3,418 0.19% 41
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 2,774. [Listed as 'Pentecostal Holiness Church, Inc..']
Pentecostal Holiness Church Wisconsin 59 0.00% 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. More exclusive 'members': 45. [Listed as 'Pentecostal Holiness Church, Inc..']
Pentecostal Holiness Church world 125,000 - 1,490
units
- 1994 *LINK* DAWN FridayFax 1997 #33: "USA: an aim without strategy is a waste of time "; Source: Pentecostal Holiness Church, P.O. Box 12609, Oklahoma City, OK 73157, USA, fax (+1)-405-789-3957 "...the denomination. which, in 1994, numbered 125,000 members in 1,490 churches. "
Pentecostal Holiness Church world - - - 72
countries
1998 *LINK* official web site 30 quadrennial conferences (regional judicatories) in US. In addition, missionaries in over 70 nations world-wide. Sister denomination and affiliate, the Pentecostal Holiness Church of Canada.
Pentecostal Holiness Church, International USA 113,000 - 1,461
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 192. "Pentecostal Holiness Church, International... There are 113,000 members in 1461 churches in the U.S., and 157,241 members in foreign mission fields. Principal strength is in the Carolinas, Virginia, Oklahoma, and Texas. "
Pentecostal Holiness Church, International world 270,241 - - 17
countries
1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 192. "Pentecostal Holiness Church, International... There are 113,000 members in 1461 churches in the U.S., and 157,241 members in foreign mission fields... Foreign mission stations are located in Hong Kong, India, the Philippines, Korea, Indonesia, Africa, Argentina, Venezuela, Chile, Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, France, Italy, England, and Isreal. " [Number in Africa is unspecified, so there may be more than 17 countries total]
Pentecostal/Charismatic Utah: Salt Lake City - - 20
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mims, Bob. "Nontraditional Religions Growing Among Americans " in Salt Lake Tribune (Nov. 14, 1998). "Ravan's church is one of more than 20 pentecostal-charismatic congregations listed in the Salt Lake Yellow Pages, and one of 10 affiliated with the Assemblies of God -- the largest of the nation's pentecostal denominations. "
Pentecostal/Charismatic world 497,000,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Monday Morning Reality Check " (Protestant); web page: "Status of Global Mission 1997 " by Justin D. Long, 1997 (viewed 5 March 1999) "In our world today there are 1,995 million Christians... Of course, that great mass of the Church has many faces when a closer look is taken... 497 million are part of the Pentecostal/charismatic renewal. "
Pentecostal/Charismatic world 540,000,000 9.23% - - 1998 *LINK* "World View: 25% of World Christians Are Pentecostal " in Salt Lake Tribune (3 Oct. 1998). [Orig. source: Assembly of God News] More than 25% of world's Christians are charismatic or Pentecostal a Pentecostal historian said... there are close to 2 billion people [of] the Christian faith worldwide. He estimated that of that number, 540 mil. are charismatic or Pentecostal.
Pentecostal/Charismatic world 540,000,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* Mims, Bob. "Nontraditional Religions Growing Among Americans " in Salt Lake Tribune (Nov. 14, 1998). "Indeed, Religion News Service recently reported that approximately 25 percent of the world's 2.2 billion Christians -- some 540 million -- are pentecostals or charismatics. "
People of Destiny International world - - 17
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Latter Rain Pentecostals; pg. 290-291. "People of Destiny International... Gaithersburg, MD [H.Q.]... Larry Tomczak [founder]... In the early 1980s Tomczak... organized a group of pastors... Membership: In 1988, there were 17 churches related to the Apostolic Team led by Larry Tomczak. "
People's Methodist Church North Carolina - - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Non-Episcopal Methodism; pg. 192. "The People's Methodist Church was formed in North Carolina by members of the Methodist Episcopal church, south, who did not wish to join the Methodist merger of 1939. (That merger united the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, with the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Protestant Methodist Church.)... Membership: Not reported. Educational facilities: John Wesley Bible School, Greensboro, NC. "
Peoples Temple California 80 - - - 1965 *LINK* web site: "Alternative Considerations of Jonestown & Peoples Temple " by the Department of Philosophy and Religion, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (1 Jan. 1999); web page: FAQ "In 1965 Jones, his wife Marceline, their 'rainbow family' of adopted children, and some 70 followers moved to northern California in search of a place which might be safe in the event of a nuclear war. "
Peoples Temple Guyana 1,000 - - - 1965 *LINK* web site: "Alternative Considerations of Jonestown & Peoples Temple " by the Department of Philosophy and Religion, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (1 Jan. 1999); web page: FAQ "In 1977 a great migration of members from California moved to Guyana, with the permission and welcome of the Guyanese government. By 1978, only a handful of Temple members remained in Redwood Valley, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. Almost a thousand people lived in the Peoples Temple Agricultural Project, which came to be known as Jonestown. "
Peoples Temple Guyana 800 - - - 1977 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 267. "When Jones began to attract negative attention in San Francisco (culminating in... August 1977), he and approx. 800 followers migrated to the Guyanese jungle and expanded the commune. "
Peoples Temple Guyana 900 - - - 1978 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 267. "Congressman Leo Ryan... flew to Jonestown in November 1978... [were ambushed when they tried to leave]... That evening more than 900 members of People's Temple... were murdered or committed suicide... "
Peoples Temple Guyana 900 - - - 1978 Neimark, Jill. "Crimes of the Soul " in Psychology Today (March/April 1998); pg. 58. "In that tragedy we heard the eerie echoes of Waco, and of the massacre at Guyana, when Jim Jones' 900 devotees drank Kool-Aid laced with cyanide. "
Peoples Temple Guyana 900 - - - 1978 Pastva, Loretta. Great Religions of the World; Winona, Minnesota: Saint Mary's Press, Christian Brothers Publications (1995) [9th printing. 1st printing in 1986]; pg. 227. "In 1978, Jonestown, Guyana, was the home of more than 900 members of a cult called the People's Temple. "
Peoples Temple world 1,000 - - 2
countries
1965 *LINK* web site: "Alternative Considerations of Jonestown & Peoples Temple " by the Department of Philosophy and Religion, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (1 Jan. 1999); web page: FAQ "In 1977 a great migration of members from California moved to Guyana, with the permission and welcome of the Guyanese government. By 1978, only a handful of Temple members remained in Redwood Valley, San Francisco, and Los Angeles. Almost a thousand people lived in the Peoples Temple Agricultural Project, which came to be known as Jonestown. "
Peoples Temple world 900 - - - 1977 *LINK* web site: "Religious Tolerance " (1998) "Jones... ordained in the Christian Church / Disciples of Christ... assembled a large following of over 900 members in Indianapolis, IN... in 1978-NOV... 638 of his adult followers and 276 children died. "
Peoples Temple world 1,000 - - - 1978 Email correspondence from University of Wolverhampton (England) religious scholar George Chryssides (31 December 1998) "Although you correctly state that 900 members died in 1978, there were survivors, as well as a group left behind in San Francisco: one documented source gives an estimated figure of 1,000 "
Peoples Temple world 0 0.00% - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Alternative Considerations of Jonestown & Peoples Temple " by the Department of Philosophy and Religion, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (1 Jan. 1999); web page: FAQ "What is the current status of Peoples Temple? Although Peoples Temple was a member in good standing of the Disciples of Christ denomination (and the largest congregational giver in 1978), it died as a congregation when its members died on November 18, 1978. One of the reasons for its failure to continue was the great stigma attached to being a surviving Temple member. Those who returned from Guyana to the United States faced prejudice, harrassment, and loss of jobs; they were called murderers and baby-killers. As a result, they made no effort to re-establish the organization. "
Pequot North America - Eastern Woodlands 2,200 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Pequot world 2,200 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Persatuan Gereja-Gereja Kristen Muria Indonesia Indonesia 13,323 - 34
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Asia/Pacific: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " INDONESIA... Persatuan Gereja-Gereja Kristen Muria Indonesia (GKMI)... Members: 13,323; Congregations: 34
Peul Mali - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
peyotism California - - - - 1917 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2172. "...peyotism... met the opposition of the Department of Indian Affairs at an early date, and the consumption of the drug was prohibited by a number of states (Oklahoma in 1899, California... in 1917... "
peyotism Canada - - - - 1945 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2172. "The spread of the peyote religion... by the Second World War was spreading among the Crow and Blackfood in Canada. "
peyotism Nevada - - - - 1917 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2172. "...peyotism... met the opposition of the Department of Indian Affairs at an early date, and the consumption of the drug was prohibited by a number of states (Oklahoma in 1899, California, Nevada and Utah in 1917... "
peyotism North America - - - - 1491 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2170. "There is some evidence that a [religious group] centering on the use of peyote, which is the button of a cactus plant native to Teas and northern Mexico, existed in pre-Columbian times, but whether the contemporary peyote religion is directly derived from these practices is disputed. What is certain is that hallucinatory substances were used in ritual practices by Indians observed by the Spanish invaders, and also that there was considerable non-ritual use of peyote. It was used as a protector in war, perhaps to confer invulerability... "
peyotism North America - - - - 1945 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2172. "The spread of the peyote religion among the tribes has been fairly fully traced. Like the Ghost Dance, its dessemination was faciliated by the American policy of collecting different tribes together on reservations. The Kiowa and Comanches were early practitioners of the cult. John Wilson spread the cult among the Caddo, Wichita and Osage, and a more conservative variant of the cult was maintained (in strong opposition to John Wilson) among the Delaware. The Winnebago in Nebraska and the Iowa tribes were visted by peyote practitioners before the First World War, and th emovement spread among the Ute. It made steady advance among the Taos Indians, and by the Second World War was spreading among the Crow and Blackfood in Canada. "
peyotism North America - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2170. "[Peyotism] appears to have begun... about the year 1870, since when it has spread rapidly from Texas and the South-West among the plains tribes and into Canada. "
peyotism North America - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2172. "Among the Navaho, as among many other tribes, peyotism was at first oposed by traditionalists who saw the peyote cult as a departure from true tribal culture. Today peyotism meets opposition from both conservative tribalists and from the small group of more educated Indians who have adapted more fully to white standards and see it as evidence of backwardness. Even though it cannot be claimed as a remnant of indigenous Indian culture, there is no doubt that peyotism is a native religious movement. "
peyotism North America - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "PEYOTE CULT: a religious REVITALIZATION MOVEMENT which swept through various NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN tribes in the late nineteenth century and survives today as a religious movement which combines TRADITIONAL practices and BELIEFS with others derived from CHRISTIANITY. The central SACRAMENT of the CULT is the use of mescaline from the peyote cactus as an hallucinogenic drug. "
peyotism Oklahoma - - - - 1891 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2171. "Many element of cult practice may already have been in existence before the coming of the Ghost Dance to the Wichita agency in Oklahoma in 1890; it was there that James Mooney, the government ethnologist, first saw the peyote cult in 1891. Certainly one of the prominent leaders of the Ghost Dance, Nishkuntu (Moon Head), also known as John Wilson, a part Delaware, part Caddo and part French Indian, became the individual who can be most specifically identified as a founder and disseminator of the new faith. Though peyotism did not originate with him, and its mythology goes back much further, the spread of the contemporary cult and some of its principal characteristics are connected with his fame. "
peyotism Oklahoma - - - - 1899 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2172. "...peyotism... met the opposition of the Department of Indian Affairs at an early date, and the consumption of the drug was prohibited by a number of states (Oklahoma in 1899... "
peyotism USA - - - - 1870 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2170. "[Peyotism] appears to have begun, at least in the form in which it now flourishes, about the year 1870... Among the Mescalero Apache rival shamans used peyote in their 'witching' practices, but there was no cultic use of the plant. But the peyote cult as it developed after 1870 includes many elements of which there is no earlier record, and this may be said without referring to the more explicitly Christian elements. "
peyotism USA - - - - 1917 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2172. "...peyotism... met the opposition of the Department of Indian Affairs at an early date, and the consumption of the drug was prohibited by a number of states (Oklahoma in 1899, California, Nevada and Utah in 1917, and several other states at later dates). In response... the votaries of peyote saw the necessity of organizing themselves as a recognized Church... "
peyotism USA - Native Americans - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2170. "Today the peyote religion is the principal cult among North American Indians in the United States, although it exists in many variants. "
peyotism USA - Navajos - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2172. "The Navaho for a long time remained relatively untouched by peyotism, although they certainly knew of it from quite an early date from their contat with the Ute shamans. The reason for their lack of interest appears to have been their relative comfort of this largest of all American Indian peoples. Unlike other tribes they had lost little of their traditional lands; they had never been forced onto reservations; and as sheep farmers, they were unaffected by the disappearance of the buffalo. After the imposed programme of stock reduction... in the 1930s, some Navaho undoubtedly experienced a period of economic distress and hopelessness. It was after this time that peyotism first made a significant number of converts among them until, today, it has become a thriving cult with thousands of Navaho adherents. "
peyotism Utah - - - - 1917 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2172. "...peyotism... met the opposition of the Department of Indian Affairs at an early date, and the consumption of the drug was prohibited by a number of states (Oklahoma in 1899, California, Nevada and Utah in 1917... "
peyotism world - - - 2
countries
1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2170. "[Peyotism] appears to have begun... about the year 1870, since when it has spread rapidly from Texas and the South-West among the plains tribes and into Canada. "
Pfingstkirchen Germany 44,030 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Listed as "Pfingstkirchen: Bund freikirchlicher Pfingstgemeinden / Christlicher Gemeinschaftsverband Mühlheim / Ruhr " in table. Source: REMID.
Phalange Middle East 10,000 - - - 1990 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 296. "Phalange (Lebanese Phalangist Party or Kata'ib): Founded in the 1930s with the attempt by Maronite Christians to preserve Lebanon from Syrian expansion. Developed into a right-wing military movement which clashed in April 1975 with the PLO. Leadership dominated by members of the Gemayel clan. Welcomed Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 1982. Estimated strength in 1990 was 10,000. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 30 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 16). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2177. "Pharisees. Described by the historian Josephus as 'a body of Jews who profess to be more religious than the rest and to explain the law more precisely'; they attached great importance to strict observance of the written law of Moses and the traditional law which had grown up around it; though attacked as pedants and hypocrites in the New Testament, they seem to have been admired by most Jews. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 30 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 4). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970), Chapter author: Roland H. Bainton; pg. 466. "By the time of Jesus... There were three parties among the Jews. The Sadducees were willing to collaborate with the occupying power, the Zealots fomented rebellion, and the Pharisees would neither fraternize nor rebel but kept the law and waited for vindication at the hands of God. "
Pharisees Israel - - - - 30 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "PHARISEES: a JEWISH religious GROUP, political party or SECT, that flourished at the time of JESUS and is depicted in the NEW TESTAMENT as excessively zealous in observing MOSAIC Law and hostile to Jesus' teachings. They appear to have believed in the RESURRECTION OF THE DEAD and such things as ANGELS which their main rivals, the SADDUCEES, denied. "


Pharisees, continued

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