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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Auroville, India

Auroville, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Auroville world 500 - - 1
country
1978 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 370-371. "Auroville, a New Age planetary village in India... During the decade following the laying of the foundation stone in 1968, more than 500 people settled in Auroville... in numbers of communities on patches of land owned by Sri Aurobindo Society... "
Auroville world - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) "new sects and movements in Hinduism both in India and the West, for example, the Sri Aurobindo Ashram, the Theosophical Society, Arya Samaj, Brahmo Samaj, Ananda Marga, Transcendental Meditation... "
Auroville world 900 - - - 1993 *LINK* "Auroville Today " in Hinduism Today International (Dec. 1993) But 900 have and 200 are children. Miss Lata of Madras interviewed some of these youths for Hinduism Today.
Australasian Conference of Seventh Day Baptists Australia 150 - 5
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Australian Aboriginal religion Australia - - - - 1800 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 547. "As Europeans began to settle in Australia, many traditional communities were disrupted. Those who were unable to retreat into areas where no Europeans had settled were denied the shared experience of traditional life that enlivened the Law. The Law withered. Australians became strays in a world where physical survival alone had meaning. Where Europeans were unable to penetrate significantly, Australians held to their Law. The rhythmic clack of boomerangs, the drone of the didgeridoo, songs, dances, rituals, and the dreaming that brought men into vital contact with the Dreamtime ancestors continued... "
Australian Aboriginal religion Australia 7,200 0.04% - - 1996 *LINK* Anglican Communion News Service (ACNS). "Australia: Statistics Show Australians Religious Affiliation " in ACNS #1315, 3 Sept. 1997 [97.8.5.2] (viewed online 24 June 1999). "According to figures recently released by the Australian government's Bureau of Statistics... of Australia's nearly 18 million people... statistics... from the nation's latest census in 1996 [which] includes the question: 'What is your religion?'... 0.04% indicated they followed an Australian Aboriginal traditional religion. While the number indicating a traditional religion has increased substantially since 1991, most Australian indigenous people identify with a Christian religious group. "
Australian Aboriginal religion Australia 7,356 0.04% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Listed in table as "Australian Aboriginal Traditional Religions "]
Australian Aborigines Australia 300,000 - - - 1770 Peddicord, Kathleen (ed). The World's Best: The Ultimate Book for the International Traveler. Baltimore, MD: Agora, Inc. (1992); pg. 395. "Anthropologists estimate that 300,000 aborigines lived in Australia before 1770. They spoke 500 different languages. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 250,000 - - - 1770 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. vi. "At the beginning of white settlement in Australia, the aborigines numbered 250,000... "
Australian Aborigines Australia 300,000 100.00% - - 1787 Day, A. Grove. The Story of Australia. New York: Random House (1960); pg. 10. "The land [Australia] was very large, and in all of it there were perhaps only 300,000 people. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 300,000 100.00% - - 1787 Luling, Virginia. Aborigines. Morristown, N.J.: Macdonald Educational Ltd. (1979); pg. 6. "The first Australians arrived from Asia. Forty thousand years ago there was less area between Australia and the rest of the world than today. But even then, there were some channels up to 80 kilometres wide, so they must have used boats or rafts, some of the first in the world. The people spread over the land and multiplied. By the time the Europeans arrived there were perhaps 300,000 of them. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 350,000 100.00% - - 1787 Meisel, Jacqueline Drobis. Australia: The Land Down Under (series: Exploring Cultures of the World). New York: Benchmark Books/Marshall Cavendish (1997); pg. 17. "Before 1788, when settlers from Europe arrived, there were about 350,000 Aborigines. They had all of the land of Australia to themselves. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 3,000,000 - - - 1788 Darian-Smith, Kate & David Lowe. The Australian Outback and Its People. New York: Thomson Learning (1995); pg. 14. "In 1788, when the British invaded Australia, it is estimated that there were between 750,000 and three million Aborigines living in about 650 different groups, or tribes. Each group had its own dialect, political and social system, laws, and territory. Aboriginal people depended on the environment for their daily survival, and the land was essential to their cultural and religious life. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 300,000 - - - 1788 Gunther, John & William H. Forbis. John Gunther's Inside Australia; New York: Harper & Row (1972); pg. 66. "Aborigines are increasing at a rate faster than the general population--but they are still fewer than one-half of the 300,000 who, in the estimate of Professor A. R. Radcliffe-Brown, inhabited Australia in 1788. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 66,000 - - - 1900 Luling, Virginia. Aborigines. Morristown, N.J.: Macdonald Educational Ltd. (1979); pg. 36. "By 1900 the number of Aborigines had dropped from about 300,000 to about 66,000. Many had died from bullets and many more from diseases, such as tuberculosis, which they caught from the whites. The rest had lost their land and their sacred places, the homes of their souls. It was not their world any longer and nothing made any sense. The Aborigines became despondent and the death rate rose dramatically. Soon, it seemed, there would be no more Aborigines. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 80,000 - - - 1966 Gunther, John & William H. Forbis. John Gunther's Inside Australia; New York: Harper & Row (1972); pg. 66. "Including persons with 50% or more Aboriginal blood, this race numbers 80,000, according to the 1966 census. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 40,000 - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. vi. "At the beginning of white settlement in Australia, the aborigines numbered 250,000; today no more than 40,000 are left. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 60,000 - - - 1972 Blunden, Godfrey. The Land and People of Australia (series: Portraits of the Nations Series). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (revised edition 1972); pg. 66. "There are about 60,000 full-blooded aborigines surviving in Australia today. You will not see them near the big cities... You will find them in the far interior... "
Australian Aborigines Australia 40,000 - - - 1975 Anderson, Norman (ed.). The World's Religions; Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. (1989). [1st pub. in 1950. 4th ed., completely revised, pub. 1975.] (Article: "Religions of pre-literary societies " by Edward G. Newing.); pg. 21. "It has been estimated that about 40,000 pure Aborigines are living on reserves, cattle stations, missions and outskirts of towns. Few have been integrated into the dominant European culture. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 150,000 1.11% - - 1977 Cornelia, Elizabeth. Australia: The Land and Its People. London, England: Macdonald Educational (1977); pg. 55. "The Australian population numbers about 13.5 million (estimated). Most people are of British and European origin. There are between 110,000 and 150,000 of Aboriginal descent. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 150,000 - - - 1979 Luling, Virginia. Aborigines. Morristown, N.J.: Macdonald Educational Ltd. (1979); pg. 40. "Today there are at least 150,000 people of Aboriginal descent. Among them are successful people, artists, writers and entertainers, sportsmen and sportswomen, and three elected politicians. But these are the exceptions. Most of the other people are just very poor. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 160,000 1.07% - - 1992 ??? Pg. 383: "Only slightly more than 15 million people live in [Australia] "; pg. 395: "Australia's 160,000 aborigines maintain their tribal traditions mainly in northern and central Australia. (Queensland is populated with more aborigines than any other state). About two-thirds of the aborigines are living a relatively modern lifestyle in the big cities. They are the poorest group in Australia, plagued by health problems, alcoholism, and culture shock. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 160,000 - - - 1993 Willis, Roy (ed.). World Mythology. New York: Henry Holt & Co. (1993); pg. 279. "Of perhaps 200 languages spoken before colonial times, only Abu 50 survive, spoken by a quarter of the present-day Aboriginal population of 160,000. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 270,000 - - - 1995 Darian-Smith, Kate & David Lowe. The Australian Outback and Its People. New York: Thomson Learning (1995); pg. 14. "Today there are about 270,000 Aborigines in Australia. Three-quarters of these live in the rural towns and lands of the outback... "
Australian Aborigines Australia 100,000 1.50% - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "The 100,000 Aboriginals are today only 1.5 percent of the population of Australia. Most of them live outside the cities and other densely populated areas. The Aboriginals are divided into a number of nations and clans. Among them there are a staggering 500 different languages divided into 31 language groups. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 200,000 1.11% - - 1997 Meisel, Jacqueline Drobis. Australia: The Land Down Under (series: Exploring Cultures of the World). New York: Benchmark Books/Marshall Cavendish (1997); pg. 30, 60. Pg. 30: "Only about 200,000 Aborigines are left in Australia. "; Pg. 60: "Population: 18 million... "
Australian Aborigines Australia 350,000 1.84% - - 1999 Associated Press. "Mistreating of Aborigines admitted " in Dallas Morning News Aug. 27, 1999; pg. 21A. "Numbering more than 350,000 in a population of 19 million, Australia's indigenous peoples... "
Australian Aborigines Australia 200,000 1.11% - - 1999 Dolce, Laura. Australia ( "Major World Nations " book series). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 63, 70-71. Pg. 63: "...Australia's more than 18 million citizens... "; Pg. 70-71: "Of the somewhat more than 200,000 aborigines now surviving in Australia, the majority live on reserves or native land, while perhaps 100,000 live in cities and urban slums. "
Australian Aborigines Australia 300,000 1.50% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Aboriginals of Australia " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "Aboriginals of Australia... Population: About 300,000, which is 1.5% of the total population living in all parts of Australia, with a large concentration in Queensland. Ethnic Diversity: There are about 300 communities with separate identities. The two major indigenous groups are the Aboriginal people and the Torres Strait Islanders. Languages: Officially English. Among the Aboriginals 500 traditional languages belonging to 31 language groups are still used. "
Australian Aborigines Australia: New South Wales 14,000 - - - 1966 Gunther, John & William H. Forbis. John Gunther's Inside Australia; New York: Harper & Row (1972); pg. 66. "By the [1966] census, there are 21,000 Aborigines in the Northern Territory, 19,000 in Queensland, 18,500 in Western Australia, and 14,000 in New South Wales. "
Australian Aborigines Australia: Northern Territory 21,000 - - - 1966 Gunther, John & William H. Forbis. John Gunther's Inside Australia; New York: Harper & Row (1972); pg. 66. "By the [1966] census, there are 21,000 Aborigines in the Northern Territory, 19,000 in Queensland, 18,500 in Western Australia, and 14,000 in New South Wales. "
Australian Aborigines Australia: Queensland 19,000 - - - 1966 Gunther, John & William H. Forbis. John Gunther's Inside Australia; New York: Harper & Row (1972); pg. 66. "By the [1966] census, there are 21,000 Aborigines in the Northern Territory, 19,000 in Queensland, 18,500 in Western Australia, and 14,000 in New South Wales. "
Australian Aborigines Australia: Western Australia 18,500 - - - 1966 Gunther, John & William H. Forbis. John Gunther's Inside Australia; New York: Harper & Row (1972); pg. 66. "By the [1966] census, there are 21,000 Aborigines in the Northern Territory, 19,000 in Queensland, 18,500 in Western Australia, and 14,000 in New South Wales. "
Australian Aborigines world 40,000 - - - 1975 Anderson, Norman (ed.). The World's Religions; Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. (1989). [1st pub. in 1950. 4th ed., completely revised, pub. 1975.] (Article: "Religions of pre-literary societies " by Edward G. Newing.); pg. 21. "It has been estimated that about 40,000 pure Aborigines are living on reserves, cattle stations, missions and outskirts of towns. Few have been integrated into the dominant European culture. "
Australian Aborigines world 265,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 58-59. "Australian Aborigines: Location: Australia; Tasmania; Population: Approximately 265,000; Religion: Traditional Aboriginal religion; Christianity "; "Since the colonization of Australia, many Aboriginal people have converted to Christianity either by choice or by the influence of education in mission schools. "
Australian Conference of Evangelical Mennonites Australia 45 - 2
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Asia/Pacific: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " AUSTRALIA: Australian Conference of Evangelical Mennonites... Members: 45; Congregations: 2
Australian School of Yoga Australia - - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "So far, 65 religious groups and associations have completed a questionnaire and are listed below... Australian School of Yoga Pty Ltd. (The): The Australian School of Yoga teaches 'yoga' which is a religion, a science and a way of life that originated in India in approximately 3000 BC. The school was established in 1983. The school's patron is Mr B.K.S. Jyengar, the Master who introduced the ancient Indian discipline to the West... His method is thorough and precise and emphasises creation within all postures. The practising of postures is believed to lead to better health. "
Australian Transmission Meditation Network Australia 160 - 27
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The Australian Transmission Meditation Network... The Network now has seven main contact centres in Australia and approximately twenty Transmission Meditation groups, each with between five and ten members. "
Australian Transmission Meditation Network world 4,000 - 400
units
- 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "So far, 65 religious groups and associations have completed a questionnaire and are listed below... The Australian Transmission Meditation Network is a network of groups and individuals practising and facilitating Transmission Meditation, a non-sectarian, non-denominational meditation activity... More recently, the release of the teachings has continued through... Benjamin Creme - who introduced Transmission Meditation to the world in 1974. Under Mr Creme's inspiration and guidance, Transmission Meditation has spread throughout the world. Since its establishment in Australia in 1991 the Australian Transmission Meditation Network has been drawing people from various backgrounds united by their wish to help the world... The Network has fifteen national co-ordination centres worldwide and several hundred groups of between five and thirty members. Membership of the organisation is not formal, and there is no core group devoted to full time service within the movement. "
Autocephalous Slavonic Orthodox Catholic Church (In Exile) USA - - - - 1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116-117. "New York, NY [H.Q.]; The Autocephalous Slavonic Orthodox Catholic Church (In Exile) dates its existence to the coming of Saint Cyril and Saint Methodius to Moravia in the ninth century... The church's strength is in the Bronx [New York City] where it ministers to Slavic Americans of various national backgrounds, many first generation immigrants. Membership: Not reported. "
Autocephalous Slavonic Orthodox Catholic Church (In Exile) world - - 70
units
- 1970 Melton, J. Gordon. The Encyclopedia of American Religions, vol. 1. McGrath Publishing Co.: Wilmington, NC (1978); pg. 73. -
Autocephalous Syro-Chaldean Church of North America Philippines - - 1
unit
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116-117. "Membership: In 1988 the church reported 1000 members and 13 clergy in four parish churches and one mission. It sponsors a church in the Philippines. "
Autocephalous Syro-Chaldean Church of North America USA 1,000 - 5
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116-117. "Membership: In 1988 the church reported 1000 members and 13 clergy in four parish churches and one mission. "
Autocephalous Syro-Chaldean Church of North America world - - 6
units
2
countries
1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116-117. "Autocephalous Syro-Chaldean Church of North America... Rockville, CT [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1988 the church reported 1000 members and 13 clergy in four parish churches and one mission. It sponsors a church in the Philippines. "
Avar Russia: Dagestan 601,000 - - - 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 294-295. Table with 2 columns: "Ethnic Group " [not religious groups] & "Population "; Pg. 295: "Aside from the Mountain Jews and the Christian Cossacks, the peoples of Dagestan are almost exclusively Muslim. "
Avar Russia: Dagestan 500,000 25.00% - - 1993 Twining, David T. The New Eurasia: A Guide to the Republics of the Former Soviet Union. Westport, CT: Praeger (1993); pg. 52. "Dagestan's more than 2 million residents range from half a million Avars to 12,000 Aguls. Most are Sunni Muslims, but Shiites, Jews, and a small group of Christians live there as well. "
Avoyel North America - Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps 280 - - - 1698 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Avoyel world 280 - - - 1698 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 93. Table: "Gulf Coasts and Tidal Swamps: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Aymara Bolivia 1,956,588 25.00% - - 1998 *LINK* CIA World Factbook 1998 (viewed June 24, 1999) "Population: 7,826,352 (July 1998 est.)... Ethnic groups: Quechua 30%, Aymara 25%, mestizo (mixed white and Amerindian ancestry) 25%-30%, white 5%-15% "
Aymara Bolivia 2,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 67. "Aymara: Location: Bolivia, Peru, Chile; Population: About 2 million (Bolivia); 500,000 (Peru); 20,000 (Chile); Religion: Roman Catholicism with indigenous beliefs; Seventh Day Adventist "
Aymara Bolivia 1,791,250 25.00% - - 1999 Schimmel, Karen. Bolivia ( "Major World Nations " book series). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 9-10. "National Population: 7,165,000... Ethnic Groups: Quechuas, 30%; mestizo, 30%; Aymara, 25%; European, 14%... "
Aymara Chile 20,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 67. "Aymara: Location: Bolivia, Peru, Chile; Population: About 2 million (Bolivia); 500,000 (Peru); 20,000 (Chile); Religion: Roman Catholicism with indigenous beliefs; Seventh Day Adventist "
Aymara Peru 500,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 67. "Aymara: Location: Bolivia, Peru, Chile; Population: About 2 million (Bolivia); 500,000 (Peru); 20,000 (Chile); Religion: Roman Catholicism with indigenous beliefs; Seventh Day Adventist "
Aymara world 2,520,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 67. "Aymara: Location: Bolivia, Peru, Chile; Population: About 2 million (Bolivia); 500,000 (Peru); 20,000 (Chile); Religion: Roman Catholicism with indigenous beliefs; Seventh Day Adventist "; "The religious practices of most Amerindian groups are a unique fusion between their traditional, indigenous practices and the religion imposed by colonizes. The Aymara are no exception. The Aymara, however, have had two cultures imposed on them: first by the Incas, and later by the Spanish... Catholicism was introduced during the colonial period and has been adopted by the Aymara... The content of their many religious festivals, however, bears evidence of their traditional beliefs. The Aymara regularly make offerings to Mother Earth... Most recently, Seventh Day Adventists have made great inroads in Aymara communities... "
Azali Babis Iran - - - - 1911 Hatcher, William S. & J. Douglas Martin. The Baha'i Faith: The Emerging Global Religion. San Francisco, CA: Harper & Row (1984); pg. 208-209. "Only one small handful of Babis were prepared, indeed eager, to assume the political role which Browne had envisioned for them. These were the Azalis, who had by this time abandoned their erstwhile leader, Mirza Yahya, to his lonely exile on Cyprus, and had suddenly metamorphosed into political ideologists, journalists... "
Azali Babis Iran - - - - 1987 Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 173. "In 1866, a definite rift opened between the two brothers, and the Babi remnant divided between a Baha'I majority and a small Azali minority... A small and semi-secret community of Azali Babis still survives in Iran. "
Azande Africa 1,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 32-33. "Azande: Location: from upper Nile basin in the southern Sudan to the borders of semitropical rain forests in Zaire (Democratic Republic of the Congo); Population: 1 million; Religion: beliefs revolve around ideas associated with mangu (witchcraft) "; Pg. 33: "During the period of British colonial rule in this part of Africa, policy dictated that formal education was to be provided by practitioners of various Christian faiths. Thus, becoming Christian was often a consequence of becoming literate. At the present time some Azande profess faith in Islamic principles and others profess Christianity, but beliefs about causation, death, and misfortune still revolve around mangu. "
Azande world 750,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 2). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 195. "The Azande live in the very heart of Africa, where the borders of the Congo, Sudan and Central African Republics join. They number about 750,000, unevenly distributed over a territory of 75,000 square miles. "
Azerbaijani Azerbaijan 6,430,500 90.00% - - 1990 Roberts, Elizabeth. Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan. Brookfield, Connecticut: The Millbrook Press (2nd printing 1993; 1st printing 1992); pg. 28. "Azerbaijan... Population: 7,145,000 (est. 1990)... Ethnic mix: 90% Azeri... "
Azerbaijani Azerbaijan 5,811,000 78.00% - - 1997 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 145. "According to the most recent estimates, Azerbaijan's population is approximately 7,450,000. Azeris or Azerbaijani, who make up about 78% of the population of the republic, are a Turkic-speaking people. "
Azerbaijani Azerbaijan 7,500,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 62-64. "Azerbaijanis: Location: Azerbaijan; Iran; Population: 35-40 million worldwide: Republic of Azerbaijan, 7.5 million; Iran, estimated 20 to 25 million...; Language: Azeri; Religion: Islam (majority); Christianity (Orthodox and Evangelical); Judaism " [NOTE: This statistic is of ethnic/cultural affiliation, not a distinct religion.]
Azerbaijani Georgia (country) 280,500 5.10% - - 1989 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 150. "Population: 5.5 million (1989 census)... Ethnic Composition... Azerbaijanis (5.1%)... "
Azerbaijani Iran 13,000,000 36.11% - - 1993 Chaliand, Gerard (ed). A People Without a Country: The Kurds and Kurdistan. New York: Olive Branch Press (1993 - revised first American edition); pg. 211. "Iran... is a multinational empire... Out of an overall population of 36 million, there are roughly 13 million Turkish-speaking Azerbaijanis, 6 million Kurds, 2 million Arabs and a certain number of Baluchis and Turkomen. "
Azerbaijani Iran 25,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 62-64. "Azerbaijanis: Location: Azerbaijan; Iran; Population: 35-40 million worldwide: Republic of Azerbaijan, 7.5 million; Iran, estimated 20 to 25 million...; Language: Azeri; Religion: Islam (majority); Christianity (Orthodox and Evangelical); Judaism " [NOTE: This statistic is of ethnic/cultural affiliation, not a distinct religion.]
Azerbaijani Iran 15,864,000 24.00% - - 1999 Lyle, Garry. Iran (series: Major World Nations), Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 9-10. "Population: 66,100,000... Ethnic Groups: Persian (51%), Azerbaijani (24%), Kurdish (7%), Luri (2%), Bakhtiari (2%), Baluchi (2%), Arab (3%), other (9%). "


Azerbaijani, continued

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