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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Overlake Christian Church, Washington: Seattle

Overlake Christian Church, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Ovimbundu Angola - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Ovimbundu Angola 3,990,000 38.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 80. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Ovimbundu Angola 4,019,870 37.00% - - 1998 *LINK* CIA World Factbook 1998 (viewed June 24, 1999) Ethnic groups: Ovimbundu 37%, Kimbundu 25%, Bakongo 13%, mestico (mixed European and Native African) 2%, European 1%, other 22%; Total population: 10,864,512.
P'nai Or Religious Fellowship Netherlands - - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 353-354. "Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, New Age rabbi and founder of P'nai Or (formerly B'nai Or) Religious Fellowship... P'nai Or Religious Fellowship has approximately seven affiliated centers in the United States and one each in Switzerland and the Netherlands. "
P'nai Or Religious Fellowship Switzerland - - 1
unit
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 353-354. "Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, New Age rabbi and founder of P'nai Or (formerly B'nai Or) Religious Fellowship... P'nai Or Religious Fellowship has approximately seven affiliated centers in the United States and one each in Switzerland and the Netherlands. "
P'nai Or Religious Fellowship USA - - 7
units
- 1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 353-354. "Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, New Age rabbi and founder of P'nai Or (formerly B'nai Or) Religious Fellowship... P'nai Or Religious Fellowship has approximately seven affiliated centers in the United States and one each in Switzerland and the Netherlands. "
P'nai Or Religious Fellowship world - - 9
units
3
countries
1991 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 353-354. "Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, New Age rabbi and founder of P'nai Or (formerly B'nai Or) Religious Fellowship... P'nai Or Religious Fellowship has approximately seven affiliated centers in the United States and one each in Switzerland and the Netherlands. "
Pachomian monks world 7,000 - - - 410 C.E. Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 503. "About 315 Pachomius established the 1st Christian monastary at Tabennisi... The Pachomians spread rapidly through Egypt and Abyssinia until in 410 there were 7,000 Pachomian monks. "
Pacific Yearly Meeting of Friends world 1,452 - 35
units
2
countries
1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Quakers (Friends); pg. 323. "Pacific Yearly Meeting of Friends... Los Altos, CA [H.Q.]... Membership though concentrated in California includes congregations in Mexico City and Honolulu... Membership: IN 1981 the Meeting reported 1,452 members in 35 congregations. "
Padhola Uganda - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Paez Colombia 68,487 - - - 1980 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 343. "Paez [Páez]: Alternate names: Nasa; Location: Colombia; Population: 68,487 (1980); Religion: Roman Catholicism; evangelical Protestantism "; "Jesuits were originally given responsibility for converting the numerous tribes of southwestern Colombia. They established some mission centers but were stubbornly resised by the Paez. After centuries of comparatively meager results, from the missionaries' point of view, the task was taken up by the Lazarists. These missionaries began to work among the Paez in 1905. They learned the Paez language and still maintain missions among them. The result today is a rather unique blend of Paez religious customs and beliefs and important aspects of Catholicism. Currently, the Paez still maintain their own shamans. Some Paez Indians have also become Catholic priests. Since the 1930s there have been organized groups of evangelical Protestants among the Paez. "
Pagan Alcoholics Anonymous USA - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 76. "Pagan Alcoholics Anonymous, Aidan or Julie, P.O. Box 9336, San Jose, CA 95157... 12-step group for Pagans recovering, or attempting to recover, from alcohol and other substance problems; ritual and meetings also... "
Pagan/Occult/Witchcraft Special Interest Group of Mensa world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 76. Pagan/Occult/Witchcraft Special Interest Group of Mensa (POWSIG), P.O. Box 9336, San Jose, CA 95157... International network of persons interested in Wicca, [women's spirituality], Paganism, nature spirituality, esoteric lore, and related topics; publishes Pagana newsletter; non-Mensans welcome as associate members... "
paganism Australia 4,353 0.02% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. Listed in table as "Paganism ", distinct from other Neo-Pagan categories: "Wiccan/Witchcraft ", "Satanism ", and also distinct from "Animism "]
paganism Balkans - - - - 1250 C.E. Ruggiero, Adriane. The Baltic Countries: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. Parsippany, New Jersey: Dillon Press (1998); pg. 35. "The early Baltic people were pagans who believed in many gods. "
paganism Bulgaria - - - - 865 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 3). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 303-304. "Bulgaria had become officially Christian in the year 865, with the sudden conversion of the Khan Boris. But for the majority of Bulgarians, who up to that time were pagans, the new religion was imposed too swiftly and forcibly to take root. From the beginning the Bulgarian Orthodox Church had to combat both the older pagan cults and various Christian heresies brought to the Balkans by settlers from Asia. "
paganism Estonia - - - - 1000 C.E. Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 138. "Pagan and totem worship, along with shamanism, were widely practiced in ancient times. Christianity came to the Estonians in the 11th century AD. "
paganism Italy: Rome - - 424
units
- 382 C.E. Boorstin, Daniel J. The Seekers: The Story of Man's Continuing Quest to Understand His World. New York, NY: Random House (1998); pg. 69. "...a still-powerful pagan religionthat commanded the loyalty of most of the ruling nobles of Rome... in 382. In Rome at the time there were some 424 pagan temples... " [Ofcourse at this time there was no "Italy ", but it's the same location.]
paganism Kiribati - - - - 1999 *LINK* Web site: "Kiribati "; web page: "Religion "; Originally by Jonathan Willis-Richards. This version edited by Mike Pearson. Viewed 31 May 1999. "Paganism: The original pagan religion of the islands is rarely recorded as the religion of record, but often forms an undercurrent to a christian superstructure. Belief in the power of magic and the existence of ghosts ('anti') is widespread. Small pagan 'shrines' are often to be found in the bush. Extracts from the Encyclopedia of Pacific Mythology by Jan Knappert can be found here. These describe some of the major players in the many overlapping myths of Kiribati. There appear to be several threads to Kiribati mythology, each offering different interpretations and populated (sometimes) by different beings. "
paganism Lithuania - - - - 1000 C.E. Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 233. "The ancient Lithuanians worshiped many gods and believed that forests and fires were sacred. The worship of fire may have become common because of the abundance of peat in the region. The most popular gods that they worshiped were Perkunas (god of thunder), Velnias (the devil, the guardian of wizards), Medeina (goddess of forests), and Zvorune (goddess of hunting). In the mid-1200s, Lithuania's leaders began accepting Christianity... "
paganism Lithuania - 0.00% - - 1413 C.E. Ruggiero, Adriane. The Baltic Countries: Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania. Parsippany, New Jersey: Dillon Press (1998); pg. 47. "In 1386 the issue of religion was settled when the 33-year-old Jogaila was baptized and married Jadwiga, the 12-year-old crown princess of Poland. As a result of the marriage, Grand Duke Jogaila of Lithuania also became king of Poland. As part of the marriage terms, Jogaila ordered his pagan subjects to convert to Catholicism in 1387. By 1413 all of pagan Lithuania had converted. "
paganism Roman Empire - - - - 100 C.E. Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 303-304. "To begin with, the term pagan was a Christian coinage, deriving from the Latin paganus ('country peasant' or 'civilian') and implying anyone who wasn't a soldier in Christ's army against idolatry. The term was not applied to Jews, who at least worshipped Yahveh (God the Father) but after the rise of Muhammad in the 7th century, it was laid on Muslims for a time despite their unswerving monotheism. Paganism was Christianity's name for the official religion of the Roman Empire, which involved worshipping an array of gods and occasionally participating in orgiastic festivals... Pagans did not, however, spend all their time worshipping idols, chugging wine, and copulating in the streets. They were often astute intellectuals capable of engaging in learned exchanges with or attacks on Christian bishops. "
paganism Roman Empire - - - - 313 C.E. Corrick, James A. The Byzantine Empire. San Diego: Lucent Books (1997); pg. 45-46. "Similar laws were aimed at destroying any pagan or non-Christian religion practiced in the empire. The major targest for these laws was the old Greek and Roman religion. Pagans were forbidden to worship, and they were fined if caught doing so. Their temples were torn down or converted to other uses... Heavy persecution destroyed the old classical pagan religion, which had been dying even before Christianity became the state religion of Rome in 313. "
paganism Roman Empire - - - - 350 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 68. "This pro-Christian imperial policy, as we have seen, began with Constantine, who favored the Christians and only tolerated paganism, hoping to see it die a natural death. His three sons, however, who succeeded him at his death in 337, took a more resolute stance. This was especially true of Constantius, who was left sole ruler in 350. He aimed at the total extirpation of paganism; he ordered the temples closed and imposed the death penalty for participating in sacrifices. Some pagans managed to carry on their worship at the great shrines in Heliopolis, Rome, and Alexandria, but they were caught in a tight squeeze. "
paganism Sweden - - - - 800 C.E. Zickgraf, Ralph. Sweden (series: Places and Peoples of the World). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1988); pg. 65-66. "Christians considered the Vikings pagans, because they worshipped many gods. The chief Viking god was Odin, known as father of the gods and the god of the hanged... Thor was the god of war, whose hammer gave forth lightning, and Frew was the god of fertility... "; Pg. 66: "The first Christian missionary came to Sweden in 829... "
paganism world - - - - 200 C.E. Oxtoby, Willard G. The Meaning of Other Faiths. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press (1983); pg. 51. "Paganism... The Latin original [word] meant 'rural', the word 'peasant' has the same origin. The use of this Latin term to mean non-Christian reflects the historical circumstances of the expansion of Christianity in the Roman Empire. Christianity spread particularly in the cities and along the routes of travel and trade, while the older Roman cults survived in the countryside after the cities had been taken over. "
paganism world - - - - 1100 C.E. Oxtoby, Willard G. The Meaning of Other Faiths. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press (1983); pg. 39. "Prior to the mid-nineteenth century, what was Christondom's notion of 'the religions'? Interestingly, for a number of centuries from the Middle Agest til modern times there appears to have been a consensus. When Europe began to take Islam seriously during the Crusades, the fourfold categorization of Christians, Jews, Muslims, and pagans caught on. "
paganism world - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2112. "Pagan. Derived from Latin paganus, 'countryman', implying belief in a variety of Nature gods and spirits, and sometimes implying delight in Nature, the senses, the things of this world; generally refers to a believer in the polytheism of the ancient world, especially of Greece and Rome, but has been used in many ways, sometimes meaning one who is not Christian, sometis one who is not a Christian, Jew or Moslem, sometimes one who has no religion at all. "
paganism world - - - - 1996 Paglia, Camille. Sexual Personae. Quoted in: Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 303. "Historiography's most glaring error has been its assertion that Judeo-Christianity defeated paganism. Paganism has survived in the thousand forms of sex, art, and now the modern media. "
Pagans for Peace Network world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 76. "Pagans for Peace Network, Samual Wagar, P.O. Box 6531 Station A, Toronto, Ontario, M5W 1X4 Canada. A loose network of politically involved Pagans and Witches active in peace, environmental, feminist, Native, and other movements... "
Paiute North America 6,000 - - - 1985 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 68. "Paiute... They numbered 5,000-6000 in 1985 on the Nevada reservations of Duck Valley, Pyramid Lake, Walker River, and on California rancherias. "
Paiute North America - Great Basin 7,500 - - - 1845 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 389. Table: "The Great Basin: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Paiute, Northern and Southern (1845): 7,500 "
Paiute USA 11,142 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Paiute USA 11,142 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Paiute USA 11,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 348, 352. "Paiutes: Location: United States (Northern Paiutes: Oregon; Southern Paiutes: along the colorado River; Nevada; California; Utah); Population: 11,000; Religion: Elements of Christianity and Mormonism; traditional Paiute "; "Christian and Mormon religious elements have been adopted over the last century by the Paiutes. Since the 1960s, most San Juan Paiutes have become members of the Full Gospel church, a Pentecostal Protestant denomination. Although members of the Full Gospel Church, however, they continue to combine traditional Paiute beliefs with their new Christian faith. "
Paiute world 7,500 - - - 1845 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 389. Table: "The Great Basin: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); "Paiute, Northern and Southern (1845): 7,500 "
Pak T'aeson Korea, South - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 415. "A number of groups have arisen under Protestant influence... In Korea itself more attention has been attracted by an indigenous form of Presbyterianism under the leadership of Pak T'aeson (b. 1915). Pak started holding mass outdoor revival meetings in Seoul in the 1950s. He claimed to be various biblical figures, most notably the 'Olive Trees' of Rev. 11:4. By establishing model communities known as 'Christian Towns' he sought to build an industrial base for the kingdom of God. "
Pakistan Christian Fellowship Pakistan - - - - 1999 *LINK* "Asia " in SIM NOW, Feb. 1999 (vol. #85); (viewed online 6 July 1999); SIM International web site. "Today, the SIM-related Pakistan Christian Fellowship has churches in Rahim Yar Khan, Khanpur, and Sadiqabad, along with several village congregations. "
Pakot Kenya - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Palestine Liberation Front world 100 - - - 1986 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986); pg. 14. [A faction of the PLO, thus a political org. more than a faith group.] "Palestine Liberation Front (PLF)... part of the rejectionist group... Formed in 1977... Estimated strength: 100. "
Palestinian Gaza Strip 550,000 - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 295. "There are 550,000 Palestinians in the Gaza Strip, and almost 70% of these live in refugee camps. "
Palestinian Gaza Strip - - - - 1999 Stefoff, Rebecca. West Bank/Gaza Strip (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 9. "Gaza Strip: Population: 929,000... Ethnic Groups: Almost entirely Palestinian Arab except for a small number of Israeli Jews. "
Palestinian Israel 700,000 - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 295. "Between 650,000 and 700,000 Palestinians are citizens of Israel and live in pre-1967 borders; 125,000 live in East Jerusalem. Just over 800,000 Palestinians live on the rest of the West Bank, and around 15% are refugees. There are 550,000 Palestinians in the Gaza Strip, and almost 70% of these live in refugee camps. "
Palestinian Jordan 1,560,000 60.00% - - 1985 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Jordan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 39. "In 1985 the population estimate for the country was over 2.6 million... One of the most important power struggles is between the Bedouin--the original inhabitants of the country--and the Palestinians, who now represents over 60% of the population. "
Palestinian Jordan 1,300,000 - - - 1990 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 295. "1.3 million Palestinians live in Jordan and have Jordanian citizenship. "
Palestinian Lebanon 500,000 15.15% - - 1988 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Lebanon ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1988); pg. 42, 46. Pg. 42: "Although records show 3.3 million people... frequent emigration makes this figure only an estimate. "; Pg. 46: "Lebanon has taken in three major waves of Palestinian refugees--after Israel became a nation in 1948, after the Six-Day War in 1967, and after the civil war in Jordan in 1970. The 500,000 refugees live in camps near Beirut and in southern Lebanon but have neither blended into Lebanese society nor received citizenship. "
Palestinian West Bank 700,000 - - - 1988 Cahill, Mary Jane. Israel (series: Places and Peoples of the World). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1988); pg. 92. "The West Bank... More than 700,000 Palestinians live here. "
Palestinian West Bank 800,000 - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 295. "Just over 800,000 Palestinians live on the rest of the West Bank, and around 15% are refugees. "
Palestinian West Bank 1,500,000 - - - 1999 Cahill, Mary Jane. Israel (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 98. "The old city of Jerusalem is located on the West Bank, a strip of territory that was won from Joran during the Six-Day War. Called the West Bank because it is on the West Side of the Jordan River, the status of this slice of territory has become the most controversial issue in Israel. About 1.5 million Palestinians live here. "
Palestinian West Bank 1,377,800 83.00% - - 1999 Stefoff, Rebecca. West Bank/Gaza Strip (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 71. "The current best estimate of the West Bank's population place it at about 1.66 million people--more than double the population figure in the mid-1980s... About 83% of the West Bank's residents are Palestinian Arabs. Most are Muslim Arabs, although a few are Arab Christians. "
Palestinian world 5,000,000 - - - 1990 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 295. "By 1990 there were around 5 million Palestinians scattered across the world. "
Palouse North America 1,600 - - - 1805 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 73. "Palouse... There were 1,600 in 1805; 82 in 1910. "
Palouse North America 82 - - - 1910 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 73. "Palouse... There were 1,600 in 1805; 82 in 1910. "
Pan Pacific Pagan Alliance Australia 250 - 7
units
- 1981 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Pan Pacific Pagan Alliance (also known as Australian Pagan Alliance): The Pan Pacific Pagan Alliance, commonly known as the Pagan Alliance, is a religious association. It was founded in Sydney, Australia in 1991 by Julia Phillips. The Alliance now has seven centres in Australia with approximately 250 members... "
Pan Pacific Pagan Alliance New Zealand 25 - 1
unit
- 1981 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Pan Pacific Pagan Alliance... now has seven centres in Australia with approximately 250 members, and one centre in New Zealand with approximately 25 members. "
Pan Pacific Pagan Alliance world 275 - 8
units
- 1981 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "Pan Pacific Pagan Alliance (also known as Australian Pagan Alliance): The Pan Pacific Pagan Alliance, commonly known as the Pagan Alliance, is a religious association. It was founded in Sydney, Australia in 1991 by Julia Phillips. The Alliance now has seven centres in Australia with approximately 250 members, and one centre in New Zealand with approximately 25 members. "
Panacea Society of Bedford United Kingdom: England - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1514. "... James Jershom Jezreel is still reckoned as the Sixth Trumpeter by the present followers of Joanna Southcott, the Panacea Society of Bedford. "
panentheism world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "PANENTHEISM: a view which combines the insights of PANTHEISM and DEISM by arguing that the world is included in GOD'S BEING or the ANALOGY of cells in a larger organism. This view was systematically elaborated philosophically by Alfred North WHITEHEAD and applied to THEOLOGY by Charles Hartshorne (1897-). "
panentheism world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 175. "Panentheism: 'All is in God', the doctrine that all creation is embraced by God. Panentheism is quite distinct from pantheism (see Spinoza) or monism. According to pantheistic or monistic theory, God is the name given to the universe as a whole. The 'all' is identified with God, so that it is meaningless to speak of God as distinct from the universe. Pantheism means that all is God and monism (the theory of 'oneness') that God is a synonym for the 'stuff' or 'substance' of the universe. In panentheism, on the other hand, the 'all is in God. The Being of God is both transcendent and immanent in relation to the universe, so that while it is inconceivable for there to be a universe without God it is not inconceivable for God to exist without the universe. The panentheistic doctrine is Jewishly unconventional but traces of it are found in some Jewish sources. the Zohar speaks of God both 'filling all worlds' and 'surrounding all worlds'. "
Pantheism Australia 835 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Listed in table as "Pantheism "]
Pantheism Oman - - - - -5000 B.C.E. Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 595-596. "Archaeological evidence shows human activity in the present-day land of Oman as far back as 12,000 BC, with fairly advanced civilization showing up at about 5000 BC. "; Pg. 596: "The original inhabitants of Oman were pantheists, worshiping various goddesses and gods. Many later converted to Christianity. "
Pantheism Papua New Guinea - - - - 1997 *LINK* Web site: Datec's "The Papua New Guinea Web Site " "now about 80%... claim to be Christian [but] the average Papua New Guinean is a pantheist.. have a belief [encompassing] more than one religion... though most... believe in God, they also supplement this belief with their traditional beliefs. "
Pantheism world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "PANTHEISM: the DOCTRINE that all things and beings are modes, ATTRIBUTES, or appearances of one single, unified, REALITY or BEING. Hence NATURE and GOD are believed to be identical. Although the term is often incorrectly used to describe HINDUISM, and various other YOGIC religions, it appears to accurately describe many NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS and the views of most NEW AGE thinkers. "
Papago North America - Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands 6,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Papago world 6,000 - - - 1680 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 27. Table: "Southwestern Deserts and Mesa Lands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)


Papago, continued

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