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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to attendance - weekly, USA

attendance - weekly, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
attendance - weekly USA - 44.00% - - 1997 *LINK* Morin, Richard. "Keeping the Faith " in Washington Post (Jan. 12, 1998). "according to the World Values Survey conducted in 60 countries and directed by the University of Michigan. The latest round of surveys completed last year found that 44 percent of all Americans attended church once a week, a figure that doesn't count attendance at weddings, funerals, christenings and baptisms "
attendance - weekly USA - 44.00% - - 1997 *LINK* Swanbrow, Diane. University of Michigan, Dec. 1997. "Church Attendance Figures " web page; "Sociology at Hewitt " site, Hewitt School, Norfolk, UK Table: "Percentage of Adult Population that Attends Church at Least Once a Week "; Source: Based on latest available data from the... 1995-1997 World Values surveys.
attendance - weekly USA - 44.00% - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "The University of Michigan News and Information Services "; web page: "Study identifies worldwide rates of religiosity, church attendance " (viewed 17 April 1999). "News Release: December 10, 1997 " By Diane Swanbrow. "Even though some Americans worship only once a year, weekly church attendance is higher in the United States than in any other nation at a comparable level of development, according to a worldwide study based at the University of Michigan. Fully 44% of Americans attend church once a week, not counting funerals, christenings and baptisms, compared with 27% of people in Great Britain, 21% of the French, 4% of Swedes and 3% of Japanese. "; "The latest U.S. [survey] figures are based on a sample of 1,839 people. "
attendance - weekly USA - 44.00% - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "The University of Michigan News and Information Services "; web page: "Study identifies worldwide rates of religiosity, church attendance " (viewed 17 April 1999). "News Release: December 10, 1997 " By Diane Swanbrow. Table: weekly church attendance in various nations. "Source: Based on latest avail. data from... World Values surveys. Results with an asterisk are from the 1990-1991 survey; all others are from 1995-1997 survey. "
attendance - weekly USA - 39.00% - - 1998 *LINK* Mims, Bob. "Stats Show Mormons Buck Secularization: Social research numbers portray high conservatism, low divorce " in Salt Lake Tribune, March 6, 1999 (viewed online 7 March 1999) "From a high of more than 75% 40 years ago, U.S. church and synagogue membership hovered just above 65% in 1996, and weekly attendance of religious services has dipped from a high of nearly 50% in the late 1950s to 39% in 1998, Duke found. "
attendance - weekly USA - 40.00% - - 1998 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 397. "According to the Gallup International organization, African Americans... Their religiosity is manifest in high rates of church membership (72 percent compared with 69 percent for other Americans), church attendance (42 percent weekly compared with 40 percent for other Americans)... "
attendance - weekly USA - 40.00% - - 2000 *LINK* Gibson, David (RNS). "Is the New Christianity No Longer About 'We' and All About 'Me'? " in Salt Lake Tribune (15 Jan 2000). "Yet religion flourishes. Surveys consistently put the level of Americans'... attendance at weekly religious observances has held remarkably steady at around 40 percent. "
attendance - weekly USA - blacks - 44.00% - - 1936 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 1075. "In 1936 the overall figures were 44 percent (black) and 42.4 percent (white). In 1963 the Harris poll found that among Negroes regular church attendance (once a week) stood at 49 percent. "
attendance - weekly USA - blacks - 49.00% - - 1963 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 1075. "In 1936 the overall figures were 44 percent (black) and 42.4 percent (white). In 1963 the Harris poll found that among Negroes regular church attendance (once a week) stood at 49 percent. "
attendance - weekly USA - blacks - 42.00% - - 1998 Swain, Carol M. The New White Nationalism in America; Its Challenge to Integration. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press (2002); pg. 397. "According to the Gallup International organization, African Americans... Their religiosity is manifest in high rates of church membership (72 percent compared with 69 percent for other Americans), church attendance (42 percent weekly compared with 40 percent for other Americans)... "
attendance - weekly USA - East - 39.00% - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 274. "In the East 39 percent attend weekly, and in the irreverent West only 35 percent. "
attendance - weekly USA - men - 35.00% - - 1982 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 225. "By a margin of 46% to 35%, women were more likely than men to report having attended religious services within the past seven days. "
attendance - weekly USA - Midwest - 42.00% - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 274. "Midwesterners, with 42 percent [attend services weekly] run a close second [to Southerners].
attendance - weekly USA - South - 43.00% - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 274. "Southerners are the nation's premier churchgoers, for 43 percent attend services weekly. "
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 47.00% - - 1977 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 50.00% - - 1978 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 49.00% - - 1979 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 50.00% - - 1980 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 49.00% - - 1981 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 51.00% - - 1984 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 53.00% - - 1985 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 59.00% - - 1986 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 52.00% - - 1987 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 52.00% - - 1988 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 57.00% - - 1989 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 48.00% - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 45.00% - - 1992 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 50.00% - - 1993 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 50.00% - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]; [Year given as "1994-1995 "]
attendance - weekly USA - teens - 55.00% - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Princeton Religious Research Center "; web page: "Gallup Religion Data " (viewed 17 April 1999). Table: "Teen Churchgoing fairly stable over the last two decades "; Subtitle: "(% of Teens Attending Religious Services in an average Week) " [Source: Gallup polls]; [Year given as "1996-1997 "]
attendance - weekly USA - West - 35.00% - - 1990 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 274. "In the East 39 percent attend weekly, and in the irreverent West only 35 percent. "
attendance - weekly USA - whites - 42.40% - - 1936 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 1075. "In 1936 the overall figures were 44 percent (black) and 42.4 percent (white). In 1963 the Harris poll found that among Negroes regular church attendance (once a week) stood at 49 percent. "
attendance - weekly USA - women - 46.00% - - 1982 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 225. "By a margin of 46% to 35%, women were more likely than men to report having attended religious services within the past seven days. "
attendance - weekly USA - women - 50.00% - - 1988 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 226. "...American women... Half attend religious services at least once every week and more than two-thirds attend at least once a month. "
attendance - weekly Venezuela - 31.00% - - 1997 *LINK* Swanbrow, Diane. University of Michigan, Dec. 1997. "Church Attendance Figures " web page; "Sociology at Hewitt " site, Hewitt School, Norfolk, UK Table: "Percentage of Adult Population that Attends Church at Least Once a Week "; Source: Based on latest available data from the... 1995-1997 World Values surveys.
attendance - weekly Venezuela - 31.00% - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "The University of Michigan News and Information Services "; web page: "Study identifies worldwide rates of religiosity, church attendance " (viewed 17 April 1999). "News Release: December 10, 1997 " By Diane Swanbrow. Table: weekly church attendance in various nations. "Source: Based on latest avail. data from... World Values surveys. Results with an asterisk are from the 1990-1991 survey; all others are from 1995-1997 survey. "
Augsburgian Confession Austria - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 46-47. "About 6% of Austrians are Protestant, either Baptist, Methodist, or members of uniquely Austrian sects such as the churches of the Augsburgian Confession and the Helvetic Confession. "
Augsburgian Confession Europe - - - - 1530 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 77. "Augsburg Confession. The most influential of Lutheran confessions, due to its historical significance and intrinsic merit. Prepared by Philip Melanchthon for presentation to Charles V at the Diet of Augsburg, 1530, it was designed to establish the integrity of Protestantism and to justify corrections of abuses in the church. Its tone is moderate and conservative. "
Augustana Evangelical Lutheran Church New York: Buffalo 406 - 1
unit
- 1926 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997). [Orig. source: 1926 U.S. govt. census from Bureau of the Census, 1930, vol. 1]; pg. 8. "Table 31. Number of churches, membership [incl. children]... 1926 "; Reports prepared by pastors/boards of elders. Listed in table as Evangelical Lutheran Augustana Synod of North America under subheading "Lutherans ".
Augustana Evangelical Lutheran Church USA 5,000 - 49
units
- 1860 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 143. "The Augustana Evangelical Lutheran Church originated in scattered Swedish families and congregations in Iowa and Illinois in the mid-1800s; the Augustana Synod was formed in 1860 with 5,000 communicants and 49 congregations, of which 36 were Swedish and 13 Norwegian. "
Augustana Evangelical Lutheran Church USA 356,584 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 458. "The largest of the Scandinavian synods [in U.S.] are:... the Swedith Augustana Synod, organized in 1860, now having 920 pastors and 356,584 members... "; [Lutheran]
Augustana Evangelical Lutheran Church USA 600,000 - - - 1959 Stuber, Stanley I. How We Got Our Denominations: A Primer on Church History. New York: Association Press Revised Ed., 1959); pg. 181. "Approx. membership in the U.S.: United Lutheran Church of America, 2,400,000; Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1,100,000; Augustana, 600,000; American Lutheran Church, 920,000; Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, 2,200,000. "
Augustana Evangelical Lutheran Church world 500,000 - 1,200
units
- 1962 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 143. "...at the time of the 1962 merger [which formed the Lutheran Church in America], the Augustana body had more than half a million communicants in 1,200 congregations. "
Auldearne Witches United Kingdom: Scotland - - - - 1662 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 2). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 174. "Auldearne Witches: Group of Scottish witches, the most famous of whom was Isabel Gowdie: she confessed, without torture, in 1662 that they worshipped the Devil, rode through the air on pieces of straw, visited fairyland and killed people with elf-arrows; she was hanged, her body burned and the ashes scattered. "
Aum Shinrikyo Japan 15 - - 1
country
1984 Jones, Greg (Asia Bureau of Dallas Morning News). "Japanese Cult Making Comeback as Leader's Terrorism Trial Goes On " in Dallas Morning News (Thursday, Feb. 18, 1999); pg. A1, A20. "Mr. Asahara founded the [group] with 15 members in 1984 and called it Aum Shinsen no Kai. In August 1989, he changed the name to Aum Shinri Kyo. "
Aum Shinrikyo Japan 10,000 - - - 1994 *LINK* "World: Asia-Pacific Doomsday cultist sentenced to death " in BBC Online Network [Friday, October 23, 1998 Published at 04:36 GMT 05:36 UK] "the cult, which released Sarin gas in Tokyo's underground railway in March 1995... More than 400 of the cult's 10,000 members in Japan were arrested and it was forced to disband. "
Aum Shinrikyo Japan 5,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Toronto Consultants on Religious Tolerance " (viewed 1998) "government failed in 1997-JAN to have the group disbanded. A legal panel ruled that there were insufficient grounds to believe that it remained a threat... with only 1,000 full & part time members. Estimates of the number of members in the group vary widely from 1,000 to 5,000. "
Aum Shinrikyo Japan 500 - - - 1998 "Japanese sect is on rise again " in Christian Century (March 11, 1998); pg. 256. "The [Japanese government] report said the sect now has about 500 members in Japan " [after a decline from 10,000 in Japan, 40,000 in Russia after over 500 members were indicted in connection to the subway bombing] [NOTE: I wonder if this is a typo?]
Aum Shinrikyo Japan 2,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (viewed Sept. 1998); "Created by Jackie Fowler For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " "A pamphlet handed out by the group reports that there are over 2,000 Japanese members. Yet another report states that that number is ridiculously low. " [Note: This text was originally on this web page (Fall 1998), but was no longer there after the author updated the page ( "Last updated: 12/22/98 ")]
Aum Shinrikyo Japan - - 26
units
- 1998 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia); web page: "Aum Shinrikyo " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Jackie Fowler For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " [Orig. source: "The Human Cost: The Aum Shinrikyo victims have their say ", by Kavitha Rao and Murakami Mutsuko, Tokyo; in Asia Week (3 Oct. 1997).] "As of May 1998 when the new Tokyo Center was completed, there are now twenty six centers nationwide. "
Aum Shinrikyo Japan - - 34
units
- 1999 Jones, Greg (Asia Bureau of Dallas Morning News). "Japanese Cult Making Comeback as Leader's Terrorism Trial Goes On " in Dallas Morning News (Thursday, Feb. 18, 1999); pg. A1, A20. "...34 known Aum facilities around Japan. "
Aum Shinrikyo Russia 30,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia) (viewed Sept. 1998); "Created by Jackie Fowler For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " "The Internet Crime Archive reports that there are at least 30,000 Russian followers alone. " [Note: This text was originally on this web page (Fall 1998), but was no longer there after the author updated the page ( "Last updated: 12/22/98 "). This figure is of rather doubtful accuracy anyway.]
Aum Shinrikyo world 15 - - - 1984 Jones, Greg (Asia Bureau of Dallas Morning News). "Japanese Cult Making Comeback as Leader's Terrorism Trial Goes On " in Dallas Morning News (Thursday, Feb. 18, 1999); pg. A1, A20. "Mr. Asahara founded the [group] with 15 members in 1984 and called it Aum Shinsen no Kai. In August 1989, he changed the name to Aum Shinri Kyo. "
Aum Shinrikyo world 11,100 - - - 1994 *LINK* Rao, Kavitha and Murakami Mutsuko. "The Human Cost: The Aum Shinrikyo victims have their say " in Asia Week (3 October 1997). (Viewed online 31 Jan. 1999.) "It is now up to 500 fulltime devotees -- compared with 1,100 at the time of the gassings -- and 5,000 other followers (10,000 previously). It opened a new center in downtown Tokyo in May, bringing the number nationwide to 26. "
Aum Shinrikyo world 12,000 - - - 1995 Jones, Greg (Asia Bureau of Dallas Morning News). "Japanese Cult Making Comeback as Leader's Terrorism Trial Goes On " in Dallas Morning News (Thursday, Feb. 18, 1999); pg. A1, A20. "Aum practitioners like Mr. Araki... Mr Araki says the government is exaggerating Aum's current efforts to recruit new members... He says that Aum has about 1,000 followers, down from nearly 12,000 before the 1995 gas attack. "
Aum Shinrikyo world 5,500 - 26
units
- 1997 *LINK* Rao, Kavitha and Murakami Mutsuko. "The Human Cost: The Aum Shinrikyo victims have their say " in Asia Week (3 October 1997). (Viewed online 31 Jan. 1999.) "It is now up to 500 fulltime devotees -- compared with 1,100 at the time of the gassings -- and 5,000 other followers (10,000 previously). It opened a new center in downtown Tokyo in May, bringing the number nationwide to 26. "
Aum Shinrikyo world 7,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: "Toronto Consultants on Religious Tolerance " (viewed 1998) "Membership had dropped to about 7,000. "
Aum Shinrikyo world 1,000 - - - 1999 Jones, Greg (Asia Bureau of Dallas Morning News). "Japanese Cult Making Comeback as Leader's Terrorism Trial Goes On " in Dallas Morning News (Thursday, Feb. 18, 1999); pg. A1, A20. "Aum practitioners like Mr. Araki... Mr Araki says the government is exaggerating Aum's current efforts to recruit new members... He says that Aum has about 1,000 followers, down from nearly 12,000 before the 1995 gas attack. "
Aum Shinrikyo world 1,500 - - - 1999 Jones, Greg (Asia Bureau of Dallas Morning News). "Japanese Cult Making Comeback as Leader's Terrorism Trial Goes On " in Dallas Morning News (Thursday, Feb. 18, 1999); pg. A1, A20. "Just two years after Japan's Public Security Commission refused to ban the cult because it was supposedly too weak to pose a danger to society, more than 1,500 Aum followers are recruiting members. "
Aum Shinrikyo - full-time world 1,100 - - - 1994 *LINK* Rao, Kavitha and Murakami Mutsuko. "The Human Cost: The Aum Shinrikyo victims have their say " in Asia Week (3 October 1997). (Viewed online 31 Jan. 1999.) "It is now up to 500 fulltime devotees -- compared with 1,100 at the time of the gassings -- and 5,000 other followers (10,000 previously). "
Aum Shinrikyo - full-time world 1,100 - - - 1994 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia); web page: "Aum Shinrikyo " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Jackie Fowler For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " [Orig. source: "The Human Cost: The Aum Shinrikyo victims have their say ", by Kavitha Rao and Murakami Mutsuko, Tokyo; in Asia Week (3 Oct. 1997).] "Size of Group: There is presently much speculation about the group rebuilding but current figures include 500 full-time devotees as opposed to the 1,100 members during the time of the gassings. "
Aum Shinrikyo - full-time world 500 - - - 1997 *LINK* Rao, Kavitha and Murakami Mutsuko. "The Human Cost: The Aum Shinrikyo victims have their say " in Asia Week (3 October 1997). (Viewed online 31 Jan. 1999.) "It is now up to 500 fulltime devotees -- compared with 1,100 at the time of the gassings -- and 5,000 other followers (10,000 previously). "
Aum Shinrikyo - full-time world 500 - - - 1997 *LINK* web site: New Religious Movements (University of Virginia); web page: "Aum Shinrikyo " (viewed 31 Jan. 1999); "Created by Jackie Fowler For Sociology 497, Fall 1998 " [Orig. source: "The Human Cost: The Aum Shinrikyo victims have their say ", by Kavitha Rao and Murakami Mutsuko, Tokyo; in Asia Week (3 Oct. 1997).] "Size of Group: There is presently much speculation about the group rebuilding but current figures include 500 full-time devotees as opposed to the 1,100 members during the time of the gassings. "
Auroville India 500 - - - 1978 Melton, J. Gordon, Jerome Clark & Aidan A. Kelly. New Age Almanac; New York: Visible Ink Press (1991); pg. 370-371. "Auroville, a New Age planetary village in India... During the decade following the laying of the foundation stone in 1968, more than 500 people settled in Auroville... in numbers of communities on patches of land owned by Sri Aurobindo Society... "
Auroville India 400 - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 79. "Auroville. A utopian city five miles north of Pondicherry along the Coromandel coast of South India, established by a French disciple of the Hindu sage Aurobindo... Given the Mother's encouragement of individual autonomy, instead of four surrounding zones of activity, there are more than twenty near autonomous communities housing the nearly four hundred residents of Auroville... "


Auroville, continued

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