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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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Orthodox Church of America, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Orthodox Church of Finland Finland 53,900 1.10% - - 1985 *LINK* Library of Congress Country Studies About 4.9 million [total pop.] at end of 1985. Two official state churches; Lutheran Church of Finland with 88.9% of pop. as members; Orthodox Church of Finland with 1.1%. About 7 percent of Finns belong to no religion.
Orthodox Church of Finland Finland - 2.00% - - 1997 McNair, Sylvia. Finland ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997); pg. 86. "Almost 90% of Finns claim affiliation with the Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Finland. The next largest religious group is the Orthodox Church of Finland, with less than 2% of the population. "; "The Orthodox Church of Finland is also recognized as an official church... It severed tied with the Russian Orthodox Church and connected once again with the ecumenical patriarch in Constantinople. Members of the Orthodox Church make up a small portion of the population, but the church has seen a modest growth among young people in recent years. A few Orthodox chapels are scattered throughout the country where Karelians have resettled since leaving Soviet Karelia. "
Orthodox Church of the East California - - 1
unit
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Non-Chalcedonian Orthodoxy; pg. 143-144. "Orthodox Church of the East... Vashon, WA [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1988, the church reported two congregations, one in Bremerton, Washington, and one in Malibu, California. "
Orthodox Church of the East India - - 1
unit
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Non-Chalcedonian Orthodoxy; pg. 143-144. "Orthodox Church of the East... Vashon, WA [H.Q.]... Membership:...There is one congregation each in India and Pakistan. "
Orthodox Church of the East Pakistan - - 1
unit
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Non-Chalcedonian Orthodoxy; pg. 143-144. "Orthodox Church of the East... Vashon, WA [H.Q.]... Membership:...There is one congregation each in India and Pakistan. "
Orthodox Church of the East USA - - 2
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Non-Chalcedonian Orthodoxy; pg. 143-144. "Orthodox Church of the East... Vashon, WA [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1988, the church reported two congregations, one in Bremerton, Washington, and one in Malibu, California. "
Orthodox Church of the East Washington - - 1
unit
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Non-Chalcedonian Orthodoxy; pg. 143-144. "Orthodox Church of the East... Vashon, WA [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1988, the church reported two congregations, one in Bremerton, Washington, and one in Malibu, California. "
Orthodox Church of the East world - - 4
units
3
countries
1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Non-Chalcedonian Orthodoxy; pg. 143-144. "Orthodox Church of the East... Vashon, WA [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1988, the church reported two congregations, one in Bremerton, Washington, and one in Malibu, California. Other congregations formerly in the jurisdiction have become autonomous. There is one congregation each in India and Pakistan. "
Orthodox Judaism Canada - - 53
units
- 1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 156. "A census by the Religious Dept. of the Canadian Jewish Congress indicates 53 of the synagogues are Orthodox, 43 are Conservative, 14 are Reform and two are Reconstructionist. "
Orthodox Judaism Israel - 10.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Associated Press. "Religion around the world ", title of subsection: "ORTHODOX JEWS PRAY AT VIGIL IN PROTEST OF COURT RULINGS " in Desert News, Saturday, March 6, 1999 (viewed online 14 May 1999). "Orthodox Jews make up only 10% of Israel's population. But they control the parliament through political parties. The rulings put them at odds with secular Jews, who comprise 70% of the population. "
Orthodox Judaism Israel - - - - 1999 Cahill, Mary Jane. Israel (series: Major World Nations). Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers (1999); pg. 68-69. "Orthodox Jews... want Israeli society to function according to... biblical laws... Orthodox Jews make up only a small portion of the population. They live in their own neighborhoods and wear distinctive clothing: men and boys dress in black hats and suits with prayer shawls called tzitzit wrapped around their waists and style and their hair in long side curls called pais; women and girls wear long, simple dresses and headscarves. "
Orthodox Judaism Israel - 10.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Copans, Laurie (AP). "Finding Their Voice " in Salt Lake Tribune, 18 Sept. 1999 (viewed online 18 Sept. 1990). "Orthodox Jews, who make up at least 10 percent of the Israeli population, believe that Jewish law -- halacha -- was divinely revealed. "
Orthodox Judaism Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 221. "Orthodox Judaism: Particularly practised in the Middle East, it insists that the practices outlined in the Torah and elaborated in the Talmud, the main body of Jewish law, are sacrosanct. "
Orthodox Judaism New York - - 29
units
- 1872 Glazer, Nathan. American Judaism (Second Edition); Chicago: University of Chicago Press (1972); pg. 38. "In 1872, there were already 29 eastern European Orthodox synagogues in New York, most of them, of course, tiny. About half of the major congregations that resisted Reform were the old Sephardic and Ashkenazic congregations... "
Orthodox Judaism North America 700,000 - - - 1986 Noss., David S. & John B. Noss. A History of the World's Religions. Macmillian (1990).; pg. 440. Judaism:Orthodox:
"One study completed in 1986 found that 10 percent of Jews surveyed described themselves as Orthodox, 32 percent as Conservative, 23 percent as Reform, and 35% as "just Jewish. " I combined this percentage with the 7 million Jews in North America figure.
Orthodox Judaism Tennessee - Middle - - 1
unit
- 1999 *LINK* web site: "Shirley Zeitlen and Company Realtors "; web page: "Religion " [in Nashville, Tenn.] (viewed 15 June 1999). "There are approximately 6,000 Jews in Middle Tennessee who comprise four Jewish congregations, one Orthodox, one Conservative, two Reform, and a Jewish day school. "
Orthodox Judaism United Kingdom: Britain - - - - 1977 Bermant, Chaim. The Jews. New York: NY Times Books (1977); pg. 14. "Many Jews (in Britain the overwhelming mass) are still at least nominally Orthodox... "
Orthodox Judaism USA - - - - 1654 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 148. "The earliest Jewish settlers in America--the first arrivd in 1654--were simple men of action little interested in philosophic dissent from Orthodoxy. "
Orthodox Judaism USA 1,000,000 - - - 1935 Hertzberg, Arthur. The Jews in America: Four Centuries of an Uneasy Encounter: A History; New York: Simon & Schuster (1989); pg. 279. "In 1935 a reasonably reliable estimate showed a million Jews who identified themselves as Orthodox. The Conservative synagogues, the newest denomination, claimed 300,000, and Reform had only 200,000. "
Orthodox Judaism USA 1,500,000 - - - 1937 Ahlstrom, Sydney E. A Religious History of the American People; Yale University Press: New Haven & London (1973); pg. 976. "Orthodox Judaism was the most important sector of Judaism, if for no other reason than it was overwhelmingly the largest, its numbers having grown to between 1 and 1.5 million by 1937. "
Orthodox Judaism USA - - 720
units
- 1954 Herberg, Will. Protestant-Catholic-Jew: An Essay in American Religious Sociology; Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Company (1960); pg. 195. "Figures for the three 'denominations' in American Jewry are no more precise. In 1953-54 Reform claimed 461 congregations, conservatives 473, and American Orthodoxy 720, with an uncertain number, mostly of the older Orthodoxy, unaffiliated. "
Orthodox Judaism USA 2,000,000 - 2,000
units
- 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 148. "The leading Orthodox groups (Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America, National Council of Young Israel, Yeshiva University Synagogue Council) insist that their nearly two million members in some 2,000 congregations... "
Orthodox Judaism USA 2,000,000 - - - 1958 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Western Publishing Co. (1972). [11th printing; original edition: 1958]; pg. 106. "The Reform movement has, like the Conservatives, about a million members as against two millions for the Orthodox. "
Orthodox Judaism USA 360,000 0.12% - - 1970 Kertzer, Morris N. & Lawrence A. Hoffman. What is a Jew (New & Completely Revised Ed.); New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 10. "Of America's 6 million Jews, approximately 6% identified themselves as Orthodox in 1990, a decline of 5% from the 11% figure reported in 1970. " [Various sources indicate a 1970 U.S. Jewish population at 2% of total pop. and about 6 million people.]
Orthodox Judaism USA 1,000,000 - - - 1980 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 125. "In 1980, Conservative Judaism reported 1.5 millionmembers; Reform, 1.2 million; Orthodox, 1 million; and Reconstructionist, some 60,000. "
Orthodox Judaism USA - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 553. "Contemporary Orthodox Judaism may be roughly divided into left and right wings. This division is by and large one of attitude, not practice. The left wing of Orthodoxy... is closely identified with New York's Yeshiva University, with the Rabbinical Council of America, and with the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America. The right wing of Orthodoxy... is today strongly, if not exclusively, identified with Hasidism...[and with]... the yeshivot... "
Orthodox Judaism USA 343,680 0.14% - - 1983 *LINK* web page: "A REVIEW OF DATA ON JEWISH-AMERICANS " (1998) [Orig. source: Feldstein, Donald. The American Jewish Community in the 21st Century - A Projection. New York, NY: American Jewish Congress (March 1984)] "In 1983, there were 5,728,000 persons who identified themselves as Jews in the U.S., comprising 2.4 percent of the population... 26% of Jews today identify themselves as Reform; 36% as Conservative; 6% as Orthodox; and 32% are not affiliated. "
Orthodox Judaism USA 360,000 - - - 1990 Kertzer, Morris N. & Lawrence A. Hoffman. What is a Jew (New & Completely Revised Ed.); New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 10. "Of America's 6 million Jews, approximately 6% identified themselves as Orthodox in 1990, a decline of 5% from the 11% figure reported in 1970. "
Orthodox Judaism USA 590,000 0.20% - - 1990 Russell, Chandler. Racing Toward 2001; Zondervan Publishing House: Grand Rapids, MI (1992). [Orig. source: Ann Levin, Associated Press, "It's Kosher to Be Kosher Again, " Los Angeles Times, 15 Dec. 1990, pt. F, pg. 16]; pg. 185-187. "2% of Americans who are Jews "; "5.9 million members of Jewish religious organizations "; "Queens College sociologist Steven Cohen estimates that 10% of U.S. Jews are Orthodox... "
Orthodox Judaism USA - - - - 1990 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993); pg. 53. "Most community surveys outside of New York found a self-identification with Orthodoxy limited to somewhere between 4 to 10 percent of the Jewish population, with Baltimore at 20% and Seattle at 16% as notable exceptions. "
Orthodox Judaism USA 880,000 - - - 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). 16% of U.S. Jews are Orthodox; 43% Conservative; 35% Reform; 6% Recons. or none (Figures refer to Core Jews (the 5,500,000 religious and nominally religious Jews, out of total 6,840,000 "Jewish Identified Population ", or total Jews including merely ethnic.)
Orthodox Judaism USA 600,000 - - - 1994 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 170. "Orthodox Judaisms, whether segregationist or integrationist, enjoy the support of less than 10 percent of [the 6 million] Jews in the United States. "
Orthodox Judaism USA 375,000 - - - 1995 Magida, Arthur J. (ed). How to be a Perfect Stranger: A Guide to Etiquette in Other People's Religious Ceremonies. Woodstock, VT: Jewish Lights Publishing (1996); pg. 213. "U.S. synagogues/temples: Over 2,000 total; Reform: 890; Conservative: 800; Reconstructionist: 80; Orthodox: Not available; U.S. membership: 4.1 million total; Reform: 2 million; Conservative: 1.6 million; Reconstructionist: 100,000; Orthodox: 375,000 (estimate); (1995 data fom each denomination's central office, except Orthodox) "
Orthodox Judaism USA 580,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 267-268. "The United States is home to 5.8 million Jews... "; Pg. 267: "About 70% of American Jews identify themselves as either Conservative or Reform, including many who do not attend services regularly, while another 10% are Orthodox (a category that includes both modern Orthodox Jews, who practice strict religious observance while participating in mainstream American culture, and a small minority of ultra-Orthodox hasidim who rigorously reject most aspects of modern secular life. "
Orthodox Judaism world - - - - 1999 Jacobs, Louis. Oxford Concise Companion to the Jewish Religion. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press (1999); pg. 173. "Orthodox Judaism: The trend in Jewish life and thought which accepts without reservation and in its literal sense the doctrine: 'The Torah is from Heaven.' The actual term Orthodox is derived from Christian theology and was, at first, a term of reproach hurled against the traditionalists by the early Reformers at the beginning of the nineteenth century to imply that those who failed to respond to the modernist challenge were hidebound. Eventually, however, the term was use by the traditionalists themselves as a convenient shorthand for the attitude of complete loyalty to the Jewish past, although some traditionalists prefer the term 'Torah-true' to describe their religious position. In any even, Orthodoxy came to mean for Jews faithfulness to the practices of Judaism, to the Lakhah in its traditional formulation. Orthodoxy is none the less much more than Orthopraxy. It is far removed from the attitude: believe what you like as long as you keep the laws... " [More.]
Orthodox Judaism - affiliated USA 200,000 - - - 1937 Glazer, Nathan. American Judaism (Second Edition); Chicago: University of Chicago Press (1972); pg. 105. "In 1937-38 the synagogue... represented a minority of the American Jews. The American Jewish Year Book estimated that Reform congregations in that year had 50,000 members... Orthodox congregations around 200,000... "
Orthodox Judaism - affiliated USA 1,600,000 - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 148. "Among the approximately four million U.S. synagogue members (out of a total U.S. Jewish population of 5.2 million), some 40% are Orthodox, 30% Conservative and 30% Reform. "
Orthodox Judaism - affiliated USA 250,886 0.11% - - 1985 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993). [Orig. source: Nine City Sample, North American Jewish Data Bank]; pg. 53. "Synagogue membership is claimed by 73% of Jews who identified themselves as Orthodox, 53% as Conservative, 37% as Reform. "
Orthodox Judaism - affiliated USA 355,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). Jews affiliated with synagogues in 1990 (NOTE: Many households do not have a synagogue affiliation): "Conservative synagogues reported 890,000 members; Reform, 760,000; Orthodox, 355,000; and Reconstructionist, some 50,000. "
Orthodox Judaism - attend at least monthly USA 189,024 0.08% - - 1985 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993). [Orig. source: Nine City Sample, North American Jewish Data Bank]; pg. 53. "Synagogue attendance twelve or more times annually is claimed by 55% of self-identified Orthodox Jews, 21% of Conservatives, and 12% of self-proclaimed Reform Jews. By contrast, 45% of the Orthodox claimed to attend synagogue once or more a week, compared with only 8% of Jews who identified themselves as Conservative and 2.5% who identified as Reform. "
Orthodox Judaism - attend weekly USA 154,656 0.06% - - 1985 Wertheimer, Jack. A People Divided: Juadism in Contemporary America. New York: Basic Books (A Division of Harper Collins) (1993). [Orig. source: Nine City Sample, North American Jewish Data Bank]; pg. 53. "Synagogue attendance twelve or more times annually is claimed by 55% of self-identified Orthodox Jews, 21% of Conservatives, and 12% of self-proclaimed Reform Jews. By contrast, 45% of the Orthodox claimed to attend synagogue once or more a week, compared with only 8% of Jews who identified themselves as Conservative and 2.5% who identified as Reform. "
Orthodox Judaism - eastern European New York: New York City - - 300
units
- 1900 Feldman, Egal. Dual Destinies: The Jewish Encounter with Protestant America; Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press (1990); pg. 112. "By 1900, however, 300 eastern European Orthodox synagogues were in existence in New York City alone, although many had only a handful of members. "
Orthodox Judaism - left wing USA - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 553. "Contemporary Orthodox Judaism may be roughly divided into left and right wings. This division is by and large one of attitude, not practice. The left wing of Orthodoxy traces itself to the thought of Rabbi S. R. Hirsch (Germany, 19th century). It is generally appreciative of the value of Western culture ans strongly supports Zionism and the State of Israel. This wing of Orthodoxy is closely identified with New York's Yeshiva University, with the Rabbinical Council of America, and with the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America. "
Orthodox Judaism - major congregations USA - - 12
units
- 1881 Glazer, Nathan. American Judaism (Second Edition); Chicago: University of Chicago Press (1972); pg. 38. "From a list of about 200 major congregations in existence in 1881, drawn up by Allen Tarshish, it can be estimated that perhaps a dozen were still Orthodox by that year. "
Orthodox Judaism - right wing USA - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 553. "Contemporary Orthodox Judaism may be roughly divided into left and right wings. This division is by and large one of attitude, not practice... The right wing of Orthodoxy which is today strongly, if not exclusively, identified with Hasidism traces itself to the thought of Rabbi Moses Sofer (Hungary, 19th century). It generally seeks to limit contact with Western culture as much as possible, is very critical of the secular character of the State of Israel, and rejects what it considers to be the pseudo-mesianic overtones of Zionism. Closely identified with the yeshivot transplanted to North America and Israel from Europe after the Holocaust, right wing Orthodoxy takes its leadership from the deans of these schools. "
Orthodox Judaism - seminaries for women Israel - - 18
units
- 1999 *LINK* Copans, Laurie (AP). "Finding Their Voice " in Salt Lake Tribune, 18 Sept. 1999 (viewed online 18 Sept. 1990). "Deep in an Orthodox neighborhood, 12 young students intently pore over thick religious texts just as Jewish scholars have for thousands of years -- with one major difference: They are women. Few such classes existed in Israel until a few years ago. Now there are 18 Orthodox seminaries for women. "
Orthodox Presbyterian Church USA 12,000 - - - 1936 Wuthnow, Robert. The Restructuring of American Religion: Society and Faith Since World War II, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (1988); pg. 137. "The Orthodox Presbyterian Church, organized in [1936], had fewer than 12,000 members, compared with a parent body of between 2 and 3 million members. "
Orthodox Presbyterian Church USA 18,137 - 170
units
- 1991 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Orthodoxy Presbyterian Church. "
Orthodox Presbyterian Church USA 21,131 - 189
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.
Orthodox Presbyterian Church USA 21,765 - 198
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Orthodox Presbyterian Ch.
Orthodox Presbyterian Church world 18,983 - 171
units
- 1986 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 164-165. "Orthodox Presbyterian Church... Philadelphia, PA [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1986 the church reported 18,983 members, 171 congregations and 335 ministers. "
Orthodox Presbyterian Church world 19,094 - 192
units
- 1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). "19,094 members in 169 congregations and 24 missions "
Orthodox Reformed Church Michigan - - 1
unit
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 160. "Orthodox Reformed Church... Grandville, MI [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1988, the single congregation had 61 members. "
Orthodox Reformed Church world - - 1
unit
1
country
1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 160. "Orthodox Reformed Church... Grandville, MI [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1988, the single congregation had 61 members. "
Orthodox Roman Catholic Movement world - - 15
units
- 1985 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 87-88. "Orthodox Roman Catholic Movement... McKenna continued to lead the movement into the 1980s and by 1985 it had 15 associated chapels and missions. "
Orthodox Roman Catholic Movement world 0 - - - 1986 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 87-88. "Orthodox Roman Catholic Movement... McKenna continued to lead the movement into the 1980s and by 1985 it had 15 associated chapels and missions. However, in 1986 McKenna was consecrated as a bishop by Berard des Lauriers, a bishop in the lineage of Archbishop Pierre Martin Ngo-Dinh-Thuc, in the wake of which the Orthodox Roman Catholic Movement dissolved. "
Orungu Gabon - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Osage North America 6,200 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 42. "Osage... They numbered 6,200 in 1780 and more than 6,700 in 1985. "
Osage North America 6,700 - - - 1985 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 42. "Osage... They numbered 6,200 in 1780 and more than 6,700 in 1985. "
Osage North America - Central Prairies and Woodlands 6,200 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 240. Table: "Central Prairies and Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Osage USA 9,527 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Osage USA 9,527 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "American West "; web page: "Indian Tribes - Population Rankings " (viewed 13 Feb. 1999) Table: "Native American Tribes: Population Rankings of the 30 largest tribes in the U.S. according to the 1990 census report (U.S. Department of Commerce) "; NOTE: These are tribal affiliation figures, not religious preference figures.
Osage world 6,200 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 240. Table: "Central Prairies and Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Osh Mari Chi Mari Russia - Maris - - - - 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 247-249. "...in recent times, native Mari religion has become a political force through the creation of a political organization for the adherents of the chi marla vera. This organization, called Osh Mari Chi Mari, seeks to legitimize Mari native religion and, against the protests of the Russian Orthodox Church, revitalize it. "
Ossetians Georgia (country) 176,000 3.20% - - 1989 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 151. "Georgia's population as of the 1989 census was 5.5 million... Ossetians (3.2%), Abkhazians (2%)... " [ethnic minorities]


Ossetians, continued

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