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43,874 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Orgonomy, USA

Orgonomy, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Oriental Mission Church California: Los Angeles 2,300 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. -
Oriental Orthodox Churches world 36,000,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "Name: Oriental Orthodox Church... Dioceses are world-wide. Greatest concentrations in Middle East (especially Syria and Egypt), Ethiopia, Armenia, and Kerala, India... Constituent churches with estimated membership: Together, the Oriental Orthodox Churches have about 36,000,000 members. Syrian Orthodox Church c. 300,000; Indian Orthodox Church c. 2,200,000; Coptic Orthodox Church c. 10,000,000; British Orthodox Church c. 5000?; Armenian Orthodox Church c.4,000,000; Ethiopian Orthodox Church c. 20,000,000... "
Oriental Orthodox Churches world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "Name: Oriental Orthodox Church; Also known as: Non-Chalcedonian Orthodox; 'Monophysite' Churches (inaccurate and usually derogatory. 'Henophysite' is the term they feel most accurately describes their Christology.); Jacobite (used for the Syrian Church, especially. Inaccurate and someimes derogatory.) "
Oriental Orthodox Churches world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "Name: Oriental Orthodox Church... Distinguishing Characteristics: Little-known to most Westerners, but a fascinating Church. Practice remains similar to fifth century. Was part of united church until 459 Council of Chalcedon. Split over semantics in describing the nature(s) of Christ. Hold the first three ecumenical councils as authoritative. Constituent churches are equals, except Indian Orthodox which is under the administration of the Syrian Orthodox Church. A newcomer, the British Orthodox Church, has accepted the guidance of the Coptic Patriarch... Ecumenical Activity: Very actively engaged in ecumenism, especially with the Eastern Orthodox Church, and also with the Catholic Church. "
Oriental Orthodox Churches world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "Name: Oriental Orthodox Church... Headquarters and 'CEO': Damascus, Syria--Patriarch of Antioch and All the East, Mor Ignatius Zakka I Iwas; Alexandria, Egypt--Pope and Patriarch of Alexandria, Shenouda III; Echmiadzin, Armenia--Catholicos and Patriarch of All Armenians, Kerakin I; Addis Adaba, Ethiopia--?... Notable 'Independent' Churches having separated from this Church since 1550: None. Although Bishop Rene Vilatte, was consecrated in the the Syrian Orthodox line, and many of the smaller 'Independent Catholic' Churches get their Apostolic succession largely from him. "
Oriental Orthodox Churches - not specified Australia 504 0.00% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [This figure combines "Oriental Christian not elsewhere classified " (498) and "Oriental Christian not further defined " (6)]
Original Glorious Church of God in Christ Apostolic Faith USA - - 55
units
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 266. "Membership: In 1980 the Church had 55 congregations in the U.S. "
Original Glorious Church of God in Christ Apostolic Faith world - - 25
units
- 1953 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Apostolic Pentecostals; pg. 265. "Glorious Church of God in Christ Apostolic Faith was founded in 1921 by C. H. Stokes, its first presiding bishop. He was succeeded in 1928 by S. C. Bass who was to head the church for over a quarter of a century. However, in 1952, after the death of his first wife, Bass remarried a woman who was a divorcee. It had been taught for many years that marrying a divorced person was wrong. Bass' actions split the fifty-congregation church in half. Those who remained loyal to Bishop Bass retained the name, but the founding charter was retained by the other group, which took the name Original Glorious Church of God in Christ Apostolic Faith. "
Original Glorious Church of God in Christ Apostolic Faith world - - 25
units
- 1953 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 266. "Original Glorious Church of God in Christ Apostolic Faith... The Glorious Church of God was founded in 1921. However, in 1952 its presiding bishop, S. C. Bass married a divorced woman. Approximately half of the fifty-congregation church rejected Bass and reorganized under the leadership of W. O. Howard and took the name Original Glorious Church of God in Christ Apostolic Faith. The term 'Original' signified their claim to the history of the church, demonstrated by their retention of the founding charter. "
Original Glorious Church of God in Christ Apostolic Faith world 25,000 - 165
units
- 1980 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 266. "Howard was succeeded by Bishop I. W. Hamiter, under whose leadership the church has grown spectacularly and developed a missio program in Haiti, Jamaica and India. Hamiter has also led in the purchase of a convention center for the church's annual meeting in Columbus, Ohio. Membership: In 1980 the Church had 55 congregations in the U.S., 110 congregations overseas, 200 ministers and approximately 25,000 members worldwide. "
Original Pentecostal Church of God USA - - - 1
country
1991 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Signs Pentecostals; pg. . "Rarely recognized by observers of snake-handling groups, the Original Pentecostal Church of God represents a significant departure from the commonly accepted belief and practice of signs people. They do not believe in 'tempting God' by brining snakes into church services. However, should the occasion arise where the handling of a serpent provides a situation for a test & witness to one's faith, it is done. Members recount times in which they have encountered rattlesnakes or copperheads outside the church and have picked them up as they preached to those present. The Original Pentecostal Church of God emerged from the Free Holiness people, the early Pentecostals, in rural Kentucky during the 1st decade of the 20th cen. Tom Perry & Tom Austin founded churches in rural Tennessee. Perry carried the Pentecostal message to Alabama & in 1910 converted P. W. Brown, then president of the Jackson County Baptist Association... There is little formal organization... Membership: Not reported. "
Original United Holy Church International USA 15,000 - 210
units
1
country
1985 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Black Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 276. "Original United Holy Church International... Durham, NC [H.Q.]... grew out of a struggle between two bishops of th United Holy Church of America. The conflict led to Bishop James Alexander Forbes and the Southern District being severed from the organization. Those put out of the church met and organized on June 29, 1977 at a meeting in Raleigh, N.C... concentrated on the Atlantic coast from South Carolina to Connecticut, with congregations also found in Kentucky, Texas, and California... Membership: In 1985 the church had approximately 210 congregations and over 15,000 members. "
Orisha religion world - - - 5
countries
1978 Cardenas, Julio Sanchez. "Santeria or Orisha Religion: An Old Religion in a New World " in South and Meso-American Native Spirituality, ed. by Gary H. Gossen. New York: Crossroad Publishing Co. (1997); pg. 478. "The bulk of Cuban emigrants settled in the U.S., where numberous [Orisha] centeres were opened in Miami, New York, Newark, Savannah, Chicago, Indianapolis, and San Francisco. Outside the U.S... centers exist in Puerto Rico, Venezuela, Mexico & Dominican Republic (Sanchez 1978). "
Orlando Christian Center Florida: Orlando 7,000 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table, grouped by state, columns for city, state, "size " (avg. weekly attendance), etc. From study finding all U.S. megachurches (congreg. w/ "consistent weekly attendance of at least 2,000 persons "); an independent, pastor Benny Hinn.
Oromo Africa 28,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 355-356. "Oromos: Location: Oromia in the Ethiopian Empire; Kenya; Somalia; Population: 28 million; Religion: Original Oromo religion (Waaqa); Islam; Christianity "; Pg. 356: "Today Islam and Christianity play important religious roles in Oromo society. In some Oromo regions, Orthodox christianity was imposed on the Oromos by the Ethiopian colonizing structure; in other areas, Oromos accepted Protestant Christianity to esist Orthodox Christianity. Some Oromos accepted Islam to resist Ethiopian colonialism and Orthodox Christianity. Islam was imposed on other Oromos by Turko-Egyptian colonialism. However, some Oromos have continued to practice their original religin. Both Christianity and Islam have been greatly influenced by the original Oromo religion. "
Oromo Ethiopia 16,800,000 40.00% - - 1988 Fradin, Dennis Brindell. Ethiopia (series: Enchantment of the World). Chicago: Childrens Press (1988); pg. 83. "The Oromo people live mainly in the southern half of the country and are Ethiopia's largest [ethnic] group. The Oromos comprise as much as 40% of the population. Most of them are Muslims, but some are Christians and others worship their traditional god. Their language is called Afan Oromo. "; Pg. 88: "The latest census says that Ethiopia's population is forty-two million. "
Oromo Ethiopia 31,200,000 60.00% - - 1991 Kurtz, Jane. Ethiopia: The Roof of the World (series: Discovering Our Heritage). New York: Dillon Press (1991); pg. 4, 27. Pg. 4: "Population: 52,000,000 (1991) "; Pg. 27: "The Oromo [ethnic group], about 60% of thepopulation, can be found in every Ethiopian province except two, but live mostly in central, southern, and southwestern Ethiopia. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Oromo groups began to fight their way onto the plateau, adopting their neighbors' customs wherever they settled. Those close to Muslim groups adopted Islam and those near the Ethiopian Christian communities adopted Orthodox Christianity... "
Oromo Ethiopia - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Oromo Ethiopia 22,140,000 41.00% - - 1997 Dostert, Pierre Etienne. Africa 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 168. Estimates of % of population in ethnic (NOT religious) backgrounds, & est. 1997 total pop.
Oromo Kenya - - - - 1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Oromo world - - - 2
countries
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures; "Ethiopia, Kenya "
Orphism Greece - - - - -500 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 14). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1925. "These Mysteries... presuppose an already differentiated society, in which there was no longer a primitive initiation ceremony which all members of the group had to go through. This new type of religion becomes evident in the time of Imperial Rome, although it had its beginnings as far back as the 6th or 5th century BC. Religious individualism makes its first appearance in the Orphic groups. The Orphics wished to lead a life of purity and without sin; many of them refrained from meat dishes, wine and sex. This 'Orphic way of life' was not one followed by many people and it was therefore individualistic from the beginning. One of the roots of Orphism was certainly shamanism... The Orphic circles in Greece never won any extensive influence over the population, but they established the principle of the individual who goes his own way, apart from the crowd. "
Orphism Roman Empire - - - - -320 B.C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2085. "The fact that Orpheus was adopted as the founder of the Eleusinian Mysteries should mean that he composed the sacred poetry, and a chronicle of 264 BC probably named him as the author of a cult poem on the rape of Persephone. In fact we possess such a poem, among the hymns ascribed to Homer, and parts of it are quoted as 'Orpheus'.... The practice of attributing to Orpheus poems composed for local cults became increasingly prevalent in the Hellenistic period and under the Roman Empire. As early as 320 BC he is the founder of Dionysus -mysteries. Later we find him linked with cults in Aegina, Sparta and Phrygia. We hear of a Corybanticum and of Enthronements for the Divine Mother, both belonging to rites in which initiates in the service of the Great Mother (See Corybantes; Cybele) were set on a throne... "
Orphism Roman Empire - - - - 30 C.E. Osborne, Richard. Philosophy for Beginners. New York, NY: Writers and Readers Publishing (1992); pg. 28. "Christianity had lots of rivals other than Judaism. There was the cult of Isis, Mithraism, the official divinities, and Orphic Mysticism. "
Orphism Roman Empire - - - - 200 C.E. Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. . "There is really no such thing as Orphism. There is Orpheus, the legendary singer, about whom various stories are told; and there is Orphic literature... a mass of poems, mainly now lost, composed in different places at different periods..., and for the most part having nothing in common except that Orpheus was claimed ass their author. Until not very long ago, it was taken for granted that these poems collectively represented the teaching of a body of people called Orphics, and a great religious movement called Orphism was constructed and extensively written about. The truth is that no prophet or sect had a monopoly on Orpheus' name. The 'Orphic' poems fit into no overall scheme. The most that can be said is that under the Roman Empire one poem of a somewhat encyclopedic nature achieved a sort of canonical authority: new Orphic poems took acount of it, and academic theologians accepted it as the authentic revelation of Orpheus. Its vogue is one thing that might be called Orphism. "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Africa 33,660,000 4.32% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Alabama - 0.20% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Albania 670,000 20.00% - - 1991 Shoemaker, M. Wesley. Russia, Eurasian States, and Eastern Europe 1997 (The World Today Series). Harpers Ferry, West Virginia: Stryker-Post Publications (1997); pg. 186. "Population: 3,350,000 (1991 est.)... Islam (70%); Eastern-rite Orthodox Christianity (20%); Roman Catholic Christianity (10%). Most people refer to themselves now as non-practicing, though interest in religion is growing. "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Arizona - 0.10% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Arkansas - 0.00% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Asia 15,232,000 0.42% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Australia 427,400 - - - 1986 *LINK* web site: "Growth of Religions in Australia and New South Wales 1986-1996 " Table "Australia " [growth of religion in Australia, 1986-1996]; "Prepared by the Buddhist Council of New South Wales from census data published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics "; "1986 adherents "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Australia 474,921 - - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "Growth of Religions in Australia and New South Wales 1986-1996 " Table "Australia " [growth of religion in Australia, 1986-1996]; "Prepared by the Buddhist Council of New South Wales from census data published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics "; "1991 adherents "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Australia 520,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Australia 528,345 295.00% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Categories combined for this figure: Greek Orthodox, Macedonian Orthodox, Serbian Orthodox, Orthodox not further defined, Russian Orthodox, Coptic Orthodox, Armenian Apostolic Church, Assyrian Church of the East, Ancient Church of the East, Antiochian Orthodox, Ukrainian Orthodox, Romanian Orthodox, Orthodox not elsewhere classified, Albanian Orthodox, Syrian (Jacobite) Church; Oriental Christian not further defined, Oriental Christian not elsewhere classified]
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Australia 497,015 2.78% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "Growth of Religions in Australia and New South Wales 1986-1996 " Table "Australia " [growth of religion in Australia, 1986-1996]; "Prepared by the Buddhist Council of New South Wales from census data published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics "; "1996 adherents " [based on 12,582,764 adherents of Christianity equalling 70.3% of total pop., total population = 17,898,669]
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Australia: New South Wales 165,659 - - - 1986 *LINK* web site: "Growth of Religions in Australia and New South Wales 1986-1996 " Table "Australia " [growth of religion in New South Wales, 1986-1996]; "Prepared by the Buddhist Council of New South Wales from census data published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics "; "1986 adherents "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Australia: New South Wales 180,649 - - - 1991 *LINK* web site: "Growth of Religions in Australia and New South Wales 1986-1996 " Table "Australia " [growth of religion in New South Wales, 1986-1996]; "Prepared by the Buddhist Council of New South Wales from census data published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics "; "1991 adherents "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Australia: New South Wales 189,096 3.14% - - 1996 *LINK* web site: "Growth of Religions in Australia and New South Wales 1986-1996 " Table "Australia " [growth of religion in New South Wales, 1986-1996]; "Prepared by the Buddhist Council of New South Wales from census data published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics "; "1991 adherents "; [based on 1996 Islam total adherents of 102,288 = 1.7%, total pop. of New South Wales would be 6,016,941]
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) California - 0.40% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) California: Alameda-Contra Costa-Oakland 6,300 0.30% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 111. Table 3-5: "Religious Profiles of Selected Californian Metropolitan Areas ". Based on self-identification, phone interviews, conducted by Graduate School of the City University of New York, 1990. Total area pop: 2.1 million.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) California: Los Angeles County 44,500 0.50% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 111. Table 3-5: "Religious Profiles of Selected Californian Metropolitan Areas ". Based on self-identification, phone interviews, conducted by Graduate School of the City University of New York, 1990. Total LA County pop: 8.9 million.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) California: Orange County 7,200 0.30% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 111. Table 3-5: "Religious Profiles of Selected Californian Metropolitan Areas ". Based on self-identification, phone interviews, conducted by Graduate School of the City University of New York, 1990. Total Orange County pop: 2.4 million.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) California: San Diego County 5,000 0.20% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 111. Table 3-5: "Religious Profiles of Selected Californian Metropolitan Areas ". Based on self-identification, phone interviews, conducted by Graduate School of the City University of New York, 1990. Total San Diego County pop: 2.5 million.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) California: San Francisco-Marin-San Mateo 11,200 0.70% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 111. Table 3-5: "Religious Profiles of Selected Californian Metropolitan Areas ". Based on self-identification, phone interviews, conducted by Graduate School of the City University of New York, 1990. Total area pop: 1.6 million.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Colorado - 0.10% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Connecticut - 0.60% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Delaware - 0.00% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Eritrea - 50.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Eritrea Information Network " About half of Eritrea's population (mainly highlanders) are Orthodox Christians, and about half (mainly lowlanders) are Muslims.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Estonia - 33.00% - - 1935 *LINK* web site: "Eesti-info serveri sisu "; web page: "ESTONIA TODAY: The Orthodox Church in Estonia Challenges in re-establishing Orthodox traditions " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999) "1935 one-third of the total Estonian population was Orthodox Christian under the Patriarch of Constantinople, including the President of Estonia, Konstantin Pa "ts. "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Estonia - - 80
units
- 1996 *LINK* web site: "Eesti-info serveri sisu "; web page: "ESTONIA TODAY: The Orthodox Church in Estonia Challenges in re-establishing Orthodox traditions " (viewed 27 Feb. 1999) At present there are more than 80 Orthodox parishes active in Estonia which vary from large parishes to small parishes located in rural districts.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Ethiopia - 35.00% - - 1965 Kaula, Edna Mason. The Land and People of Ethiopia (series: Portraits of the Nations Series). Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co. (1965); pg. 21. "Religion plays an enormous role in the lives of most Ethiopians... another source, which divides the practicing religions into 35% Orthodox Christian, 35% Muslim, 25% pagan, and 5% miscellaneous. "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Europe 158,775,008 21.77% - - 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Source: 1999 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 695. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1998 "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Finland 57,000 1.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Christian Religion With statistics of other religions in Finland "; by Osmo Joronen, 1998 Table: "Churches and religions in Finland "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Finland 57,000 1.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Evangelical Church in Finland official web site; web page: "Churches and religions in Finland "; (viewed 5 July 1999). Table: "Churches and religions in Finland "; Listed in table as "Orthodox "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Finland - - - - 1999 *LINK* Evangelical Church in Finland official web site; web page: "Churches and religions in Finland "; (viewed 5 July 1999). "Orthodox believers make up 1% of the population, as do Pentecostals. "
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Florida - 0.20% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Florida: Miami-Ft. Lauderdale 6,400 0.20% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 112. Table 3-6: "Religious Profiles of Selected Metropolitan Areas ". Based on self-identification, phone interviews, conducted by Graduate School of the City University of New York, 1990. Total area pop: 3.2 million.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Georgia, USA - 0.00% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Germany 870,100 - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Religionswissenschaftlicher Medien- und Informationsdienst e.V. " [REMID: Religious Studies Media and Information Service, Marburg, Germany]; web page: "Informationen und Standpunkte " (viewed 2 Aug. 1999). Table: "Religious communities in Germany: Numbers of members " [data published July, 1999]; Sum of all 14 groups in 'Orthodox and Eastern Churches' section.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Idaho - 0.10% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Illinois - 0.50% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Illinois: Chicago 16,800 0.60% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 110. Table 3-5: "Religious Profiles of Selected Cities by Percentage ". Based on self-identification, phone interviews, conducted by Graduate School of the City University of New York, 1990. Total Chicago pop: 2.8 million.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Indiana - 0.20% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Orthodox (Eastern Christian) Iowa - 0.00% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.


Orthodox (Eastern Christian), continued

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