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Index

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Open Bible Standard Churches, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Open Bible Standard Churches Minnesota - - 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Missouri - - 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Montana - - 5
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Nebraska - - 12
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches New Mexico - - 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches New York - - 8
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Ohio - - 40
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Oklahoma - - 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Oregon - - 27
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Pennsylvania - - 9
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches South Dakota - - 11
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Tennessee - - 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Texas - - 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Trinidad and Tobago 3,000 - - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD 1979); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Largest groups: Anglicans 120,000 adherents, Methodists 50,000, Nazarenes 8,000, Open Standard Churches 3,000, Pentecostal Assemblies 30,000.
Open Bible Standard Churches USA 40,000 - 325
units
- 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 252. "Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc.... Des Moines, IA [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1987 the Church reported over 40,000 members in 300 congregations, 25 nonchartered cooperating churches, and 883 ministers [in the U.S.]. "
Open Bible Standard Churches USA - - 337
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches USA 4,000 - - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 15-17. Table 1-2: Self-Described Adherence of U.S. Adult Population 1990. Phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by Graduate School of City U. of New York.; Listed in table simply as "Open Bible "
Open Bible Standard Churches USA 40,000 - 310
units
- 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 176. "There are now churches in 31 states, concentrated in the central and far west states... The denomination ministers in 30 countries under the direction of 31 U.S. missionaries and 17 national directors... The 310 churches--with approximately 40,000 members--hold membership in the Pentecostal Fellowship of North America and the National Association of Evangelicals. "
Open Bible Standard Churches USA 40,000 - 368
units
- 1992 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 248-255. Table 2: US Current Stats. (# of adherents from "inclusive membership " column, not sometimes smaller "full communicant " col.) Listed in table as "Open Bible Standard Churches. "
Open Bible Standard Churches USA 45,988 - 361
units
- 1996 World Almanac and Book of Facts 1998; K-III Reference Corp.: Macwah, NJ (1997). [Orig. sources: 1997 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 651. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Membership figs. generally based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. are inclusive: refer to all "members, " not simply full communicants.
Open Bible Standard Churches USA - - 374
units
- 1998 World Almanac and Book of Facts 2000. Mahwah, NJ: PRIMEDIA Reference Inc. (1999). [Orig. sources: 1999 Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches; World Almanac research]; pg. 692. Table: "Membership of Religious Groups in U.S. "; Based on reports from officials by each group. Figs. inclusive; refer to all "members ". Listed as Open Bible Standard Chs.
Open Bible Standard Churches Virginia - - 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Washington - - 26
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches West Virginia - - 8
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Wisconsin - - 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches world 67,000 - - - 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 252. "Open Bible Standard Churches... In 1987 the Church reported over 40,000 members in 300 congregations, 25 nonchartered cooperating churches, and 883 ministers. There were also 1,000 members in Canada and 26,000 members overseas. "
Open Bible Standard Churches world - - 850
units
32
countries
1993 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 109. "The original group.. has enlarged to incorporate over 1579 ministers and 850 churches in 32 countries. "
Open Bible Standard Churches world 46,000 - 360
units
30
countries
1993 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (10th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1995). listed as "Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc. "
Open Bible Standard Churches Wyoming - - 7
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Operation Rescue USA 35,000 - - - 1995 Witt, Lynn; S. Thomas & Eric Marcus (ed.) Out in All Directions: A Treasury of Gay and Lesbian America. New York: Warner Books (1995); [Compiled by P-Flag]; pg. 477. List of "Family Values " organizations. "Operation Rescue - Nationally known for... shutdowns of abortion clinics... [confronting abortion workers through] intimidation tactics. Trains activists. Added gay rights to agenda when President Clinton proposed to lift the military ban. 35,000+ members. (Head: Randall Terry) "
Opus Dei Spain 60,000 0.18% - - 1975 Keefe, Eugene K., et al. Area Handbook for Spain (1st Ed.). Washington, D.C.: Foreign Area Studies of The American University (1976; research completed 1975); pg. 140. "Perhaps the most influential and certainly the most controversial religious community in the mid-1970s [in Spain] was Opus Dei, an association of lay Catholics that has exercised great influence at the ministerial level and in key economic positions... In June 1975 its founder, Escriva de Balaguer, died... and Rome appointed a new director for the organization, which had at least 60,000 members. "
Opus Dei United Kingdom: Britain 600 - - - 1993 "Information about Opus Dei " tract (OPPOSING viewpoint). Published by INFORM (Information Network Focus on Religious Movements, supported by 'mainstream Churches' in U.K.), London, UK. "There are some 600 members in Britain. "
Opus Dei United Kingdom: Britain - - - - 1993 "Information about Opus Dei " tract (OPPOSING viewpoint). Published by INFORM (Information Network Focus on Religious Movements, supported by 'mainstream Churches' in U.K.), London, UK. "...Opus Dei... encourages members to run 'corporate apostolic undertakings'. There are hundreds of these, often registered as charities, administered and staffed by Opus Dei members and others. In Britain they include student hostels, youth clubs, catering colleges for women and cultural and social centres. "
Opus Dei world 76,440 - - - 1991 "Information about Opus Dei " tract (OPPOSING viewpoint). Published by INFORM (Information Network Focus on Religious Movements, supported by 'mainstream Churches' in U.K.), London, UK. "Only Roman Catholics who have the convitino, which must be shard by the directors of Opus Dei, that they are called by God to do so, may join. In 1991 there were 74,710 lay members (30% of whom were numeraries), 1,285 priests and 345 student priests. "
Opus Dei world - - - 45
countries
1993 "Information about Opus Dei " tract (OPPOSING viewpoint). Published by INFORM (Information Network Focus on Religious Movements, supported by 'mainstream Churches' in U.K.), London, UK. "The full title of the organisation known as Opus Dei (The Work of God) is 'The Prelature of the Holy Cross and Opus Dei'... was established as the first, and so far only, Personal Prelature in 1982. It is governed by a Prelate, currently Bishop Alvaro del Portillo (1914- )... Opus Dei founded by Josemaria Escriva (1902-1975), a Spanish priest, in Madrid on 2nd October 1928. It began with small weekly gatherings of laymen and was later extended to include women (1930) and priests (1943). In 1946 Escriva settled in Rome and Opus Dei began to spread throughout Europe, coming to England that same year. Escriva was beautified in May 1992... Opus Dei is active in overy forty-five countries around the world... they have universities, schools, publishing houses, a centre for research and communication, business schools, orphanages, agricultural training schemes, and primary health care projects. "
Orang Asli Malaysia 95,529 0.50% - - 1995 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 600-601. "Numbering 95,529 people in 1995, the Orang Asli are fond in all 11 states of Peninsular Malaysia. The Orang Asli constitute an extremely small segment of the population of Malaysia, making up only 0.5% of the total population... " Pg. 601: "Unlike other major religions of the world, the Orang Asli religion does not possess any written script. Traditionally the Orang Asli are animists and believe that there are spirits that dwell in inanimate objects such as trees and rocks... Beliefs in shamanism are still very strong among some tribes... Aside from shamanism, dreams occupy an important place in the spiritual life of the Orang Asli... Today, some Orang Asli have embraced other major religions, particulay Islam and Christianity. "
Orange Order United Kingdom: Northern Ireland 90,000 5.62% - - 1991 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Northern Ireland ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1991); pg. 40. "The largest Protestant organization is the Orange Order, a group founded in northeastern Ireland in 1795. In the early 1990s, the group had about 90,000 members. The order draws its support from several different Protestant religious groups and works to improve the position of the country's Protestant citizens. To publicly display its strength, the order holds an annual parade on July 12 to celebrate the victory of Prince William of Orange over King James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. "
Oraons India - south - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 707. "South Asian Tribal Religions... Speakers of Dravidian languages are found mainly in South India and include primitive hunters and food gatherers such as Chenchus and Kadars, as well as relatively advanced farming peoples such as Gonds and Oraons. "
Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids Europe - - - - 1964 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 6). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 722. "The line of Chosen Chiefs includes, besides [John] Toland, Dr. Stukeley and Lewis Spence, the antiquarians, and William Blake, the visionary poet and artist. The main English Order was reformed in 1964 as the Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids, conforming to these grades in Brittany, France and Wales. At the same time the public observances were increased to eight -- the four solstices and equinoxes, and the four Celtic festivals of Imbolc..., Beltane..., Lugnasad..., and Samhain... "
Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids world 4,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* official organization web page (1998) "How many members are there? About four thousand people have joined since the distance learning programme was started in 1988. At any one time about 600 people across the world are studying the course. "
Order of Bards, Ovates and Druids world 7,000 - 30
units
20
countries
1998 *LINK* official organization web page (1998) "The Order of Bards Ovates and Druids is probably the largest and most established of the Druid groups in existence today. Tracing our origins to 1717, and with over 7,000 members in 20 countries, with 30 local groups worldwide "
Order of New Templars Europe - - - - 1900 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1982. "Viennese occultist, racial theorist and founder of the Order of New Templars, ...Jorg Lanz von Liebenfels... was born at Vienna on 19 July 1874 as Adolf Lanz... In 1893, at the age of 19, he became a novice at a Cistercian monastery at Heiligenkreuz (on the present Austro-Hungarian border) but was expelled six years later... Shortly afterwards he founded his Order of New Templars, which had a strongly 'racial-religious' emphasis. In 1934, a year after Hitler came to power, he wrote that the Order was 'the first manifestation of the Movement (i.e. HItler's) which now, in accordance with the law of God, is most powerful in history and unrestrainedly sweeping over the world.' Lanz was not the only founder of a Central European sect to claim that he had anticipated Hitler's racial and other theories. "
Order of New Templars Europe - - 6
units
- 1920 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1983. "The Order of New Templars... acquired its first Temple in 1907 when Lanz purchased and equipped Burg Werfenstein, a romantic ruin high above the River Danube... Other Temples were consecrated later at Marienkamp, close to the Plattensee, at Staufen near Ulm, and at Rugen on the Baltic coast. The Order also had sells at Salzburg and in Hungary... [Total of 6 locations, at least.] The New Templars never represented a mass movement and its existence probably remained unknown to all except an enthusiastic minority. With the exception of the dramatist August Strindberg, with whom Lanz was on friendly terms, no widely-known personalities were members. "
Order of New Templars world - - 1
unit
- 1907 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1983. "The Order of New Templars... acquired its first Temple in 1907 when Lanz purchased and equipped Burg Werfenstein, a romantic ruin high above the River Danube. It is recorded that he hoisted a flag incorporating a swastika there in that year, when Hitler himself was only 18 years old. "
Order of the Elus-Cohen France - - - - 1772 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1746-47. "...Order's chief centres were its 'chapters' at Foix (established in 1760), Bordeaux (1716), Paris (1767), Lyons (1768) and other French cities... and 'temples' which ranked lower, founded at Amboise, Tours, Blois and Poitiers in 1767. "
Order of the Elus-Cohen Haiti - - - - 1772 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1746-47. "...Order's chief centres were its 'chapters' at Foix... and other French cities, and those on Santo Domingo, including Port-au-Prince (1772)... "
Order of the Elus-Cohen world - - - 2
countries
1772 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1746-47. "Martinez de Pasqually, founder of the occult school known as Martinism, was born at Grenoble in 1710 and died in Santo Domingo (now Haiti) in 1774... the Martinist Ordre des Chevalier-Macons, Elus-Cohens de l'Univers (Orrder of Knights-Masons, Chosen Priests of the Universe)... The Order's chief centres were its 'chapters' at Foix (established in 1760), Bordeaux (1716), Paris (1767), Lyons (1768) and other French cities, and those on Santo Domingo, including Port-au-Prince (1772); and 'temples' which ranked lower, founded at Amboise, Tours, Blois and Poitiers in 1767. After the death of Martinez de Pasqually the Order declined and in 1781 was allowed to lapse by the Order's then Grand Master, Sebastian de las Casas. "
Order of the Holy City France - - - - 1778 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1747. "Jean-Baptiste Willermoz tried to perpetuate Martinist teaching in the secret degree of the Order of the Holy City, founded at Lyons in 1778. "
Order of the Nine Angles United Kingdom - - - - 1995 Harvey, G. "Satanism in Britain Today " in Journal of Contemporary Religion. Vol. 10, No. 3, October 1995; pg. 284. "...there are Satanists in Britain. There are six groups who between them have less than 100 members... Temple of Set, numerically the largest group... I also discuss the Church of Satan, the Order of the Nine Angles... "
Order, The USA - - - - 1983 Landau, Elaine. The White Power Movement: America's Racist Hate Groups. Brookfield, CT: Milbrook Press (1993); pg. 60. "In the fall of 1983 an ultra-right wing band of Aryan Nations followers formed a new violence-prone group known as the Order. The group has also gone by the names Bruder Schweigen or Silent Brotherhood (which differs from the Bruder Schweigen Strike Force Two), the White American Bastion, and the Aryan Resistance Movement. Its ultimate goal was to establish a separate Aryan homeland in the U.S. Pacific Northwest which would function independently from the U.S. government. To finance the plan, in 1983 and 1984 the group conducted a series of armored-car robberies that netted over $4.5 million for their cause... Prompt FBI intervention, combined with the efforts of local law-enforcement... was instrumental in effectively reining in the Order's violent crime spree. Eventually more than two dozen Order members were arrested in thirteen states. The majority... ended up serving lengthy federal prison terms. "
Order, The USA 72 - - - 1983 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 70-74. "The Order. In 1983, a group of men and several women came together from three different organizations: the Aryan Nations; The Covenant, the Sword and the Arm of the Lord; and the organization called The National Alliance. They just couldn't wait for eventual establishment of an all-white Kingdom of God, so they formed a secret, vicious arm of the Aryan Nations that went under various names at different times. These included the Order, Bruders Schweigen (German for Silent Brotherhood), the White American Bastion, and the Aryan Resistance Movement. The three dozen or so members were dedicated to terror, violence, and extortion in their effort to overthrow the government... 1984... more than 200 police and federal agents... crept up on The Order's hideout in Washington state. Eeryone but Matthews eventually surrendered... Matthews was burned beyond recognition but rose up as the revered martyr of the cause. Another 24 members were sent to prison for 12 to 100 years. "
Order, The USA - - - - 1985 Able, Deborah. Hate Groups (series: "Issues in Focus "). Springfield, N.J.: Enslow Publishers, Inc. (1995); pg. 49-50. "During the early to mid-1980s... The Order was described by one FBI agent as a 'small cadre of individuals dedicated to violence [and] engaged in para-military activities.' Although small in number, they were described... as 'more dangerous than the Klan groups from which they emanated.'... also called White American Bastion or the Silent Brotherhood. "
Order, The world 40 - - - 1989 Thompson, S. E. Hate Groups. San Diego, CA: Lucent Books (1994); pg. 59. "The Turner Diaries inspired the founding of the Order, an ultra-secretive group of about forty members. The Order, which is thought to have disbanded after FBI arrests in the 1980s... "
Ordo Lux Poland - - - - 1992 Chalfant, H. Paul, et al. Religion in Contemporary Society (3rd Ed.); Itasca, Illinois: F.E. Peacock Publishers (1994); pg. 243-244. "In Poland he found (Maxwell, 1992:37) the following NRMs: 22 Zen Buddhist organizations; 13 Hindu orgs.; 2 Theosophical orgs; Hawaiian Kahuna, a magic movement; Ordo Lux, a Pagan occult movement; 2 esoteric Yoga groups; a Sikh group; a Bahai' group; a Rastafarian gorup. " [these are number of organizations, not necessarily be number of "units "]
Ordo Servorum Isidis Rhode Island - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* web site: "House of Netjer " (viewed Dec.1998) "Kemetic Orthodox following today is small... in the world, we know only of 2 temples...: the House of Netjer and Ordo Servorum Isidis... Ordo Servorum Isidis has no connection with the House of Netjer... Based in Rhode Island... "
Ordo Servorum Isidis world - - 1
unit
1
country
1998 *LINK* web site: "House of Netjer " (viewed Dec.1998) "Kemetic Orthodox following today is small... in the world, we know only of 2 temples...: the House of Netjer and Ordo Servorum Isidis... Ordo Servorum Isidis has no connection with the House of Netjer... Based in Rhode Island... "
Ordo Sinistra Vivendi Australia - - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The Ordo Sinistra Vivendi is an esoteric Order of the Western Tradition. Its goal is a new and vital Western Imperium by way of the Galactic Aeon. Members seek to restore balance to both the individual and the societies of Western Civilisation. They oppose those creeds, political and religious, which seek to undermine the Western peoples. The Order consists of men and women who are bound by their personal destinies to progress (in times past this was the original meaning of the word evil: to go beyond measure) to the next step in human evolution. Traditional Satanism offers an understanding of the forces that create and shape change in the phenomenal world. Members of Ordo Sinistra Vivendi believe that they are able to understand the reality of carnal existence because they are not constrained by the abstract moralities of the rest of Humanity. They believe this to be the essence of Heresy, the way of the Prince of Darkness. "
Ordo Templi Orientis Australia - - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The O.T.O. was first established in Australia in 1915 under the leadership of Frank Bennett, a devoted student of Aleister Crowley. However the organisation had more or less ceased activities by the mid-late 1920s, and closed with Bennett's death in 1930. It was reestablished in Australia and New Zealand (jointly) in the early 1980s. In 1990 the O.T.O. incorporated as a New South Wales Association. In 1994 it registered as an Australian Registrable Body, and it was recognised as a tax exempt religious institution. "
Ordo Templi Orientis New Zealand - - - - 1981 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The O.T.O. was... reestablished in Australia and New Zealand (jointly) in the early 1980s. "
Ordo Templi Orientis world 3,000 - - 40
countries
1997 *LINK* official organization web page Thelema:Ordo Templi Orientis:
As of February 1997 e.v., O.T.O. has approximately 3000 members, and is active to varying extents in about 40 countries.
Ordo Templi Orientis world - - - - 1998 *LINK* Ireland, Rowan. Web site: La Trobe University, Bundoora, Australia; web page: "New Religious Associations in Australia ", written January 1998. (Viewed 4 July 1999). "The Ordo Templi Orientis (Order of the Temple of the East) or O.T.O. was founded in 1902 by a wealthy Austrian paper chemist Karl Kellner, who was also a Freemason, a scholar of Eastern mysticism, and an initiate of an organisation called the Hermetic Brotherhood of Luxor, or the Hermetic Brotherhood of Light. Kellner is regarded as the 'Spiritual Father' of the O.T.O., which was co-founded by Theodor Reuss, Franz Hartmann, and Henrich Klein. The O.T.O. is perhaps best known for its involvement with the poet and mystic Aleister Crowley, who served as the world (or Outer) Head of O.T.O. from 1922 until his death in 1947. "
Ordo Templi Orientis world 3,000 - - 17
countries
1998 *LINK* web site: Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance -
Oregon Pagan Association Oregon - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 76. "Oregon Pagan Association, c/o ASUO; EMU, Suite 4, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, Networking and ritual-oriented organization that enables Pagans and those interested in magick and the Goddess to contact each other... "
Organizacion Cristiana Amor Viviente Honduras 6,500 - 44
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " HONDURAS... Organizacion Cristiana Amor Viviente; Members: 6,500+/-; Congregations: 44
Orgonomy USA - - - - 1994 Cohen, Daniel. Cults. Brookfield, Connecticut: Millbrook Press (1994); pg. 29-31. "A Medical Cult: While the word 'cult' most commonly is applied to religious groups, political, scientific, and medical theories have often developed followings that can properly be described as cultlike. Take the curious case of Dr. Wilhelm Reich. Dr. Reich was a brilliant and influential medical man. He was an early disciple of Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis. During the 1920s and 1930s, Reich was nearly as well known as his famous mentor. At some point Reich came to believe that he had discovered a previously unknown form of energy that he called 'orgone energy.'... His Institute of Orgonomy, located on Long Island, New York, was filled by his most devoted followers... He died [in jail] in 1957... A small coterie of believers in Reich's orgone theories still exists. "


Orgonomy, continued

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