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43,874 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Om Sakathi, Nigeria

Om Sakathi, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Om Sakathi Singapore - - 1
unit
- 1997 *LINK* official web site; web page: "Om Sakathi Organization " (viewed 26 Jan. 1999) Table "Numbers of Registered Mandrams "; "Data for the year 1997 "; "Each Mandram has between eight and several thousand members. "; [also called "Adhiparasakthi Movement "]
Om Sakathi Sri Lanka - - 1
unit
- 1997 *LINK* official web site; web page: "Om Sakathi Organization " (viewed 26 Jan. 1999) Table "Numbers of Registered Mandrams "; "Data for the year 1997 "; "Each Mandram has between eight and several thousand members. "; [also called "Adhiparasakthi Movement "]; Country is listed in table as "Ceylon "
Om Sakathi USA - - 2
units
- 1997 *LINK* official web site; web page: "Om Sakathi Organization " (viewed 26 Jan. 1999) Table "Numbers of Registered Mandrams "; "Data for the year 1997 "; "Each Mandram has between eight and several thousand members. "; [also called "Adhiparasakthi Movement "]
Om Sakathi Zambia - - 2
units
- 1997 *LINK* official web site; web page: "Om Sakathi Organization " (viewed 26 Jan. 1999) Table "Numbers of Registered Mandrams "; "Data for the year 1997 "; "Each Mandram has between eight and several thousand members. "; [also called "Adhiparasakthi Movement "]
Omaha North America 2,800 - - - 1780 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 43. "Omaha... They numbered 2,800 in 1780; 1,300 in 1970. "
Omaha North America 1,300 - - - 1970 Legay, Gilbert. Atlas of Indians of North America. Hauppauge, NY: Barron's (1995); pg. 43. "Omaha... They numbered 2,800 in 1780; 1,300 in 1970. "
Omaha North America - Northern Great Plains 2,800 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 288. Table: "Northern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Omaha USA 4,143 - - - 1990 Utter, Jack. American Indians: Answers to Today's Questions. Lake Ann, MI: National Woodlands Publishing Co. (1993); pg. 38. Table: "Largest American Indian Tribes (as identified in the 1990 Census, through self-reporting) "
Omaha world 2,800 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 288. Table: "Northern Great Plains: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Omega 7 USA - - - - 1990 Lang, Susan S. Extremist Groups in America. New York: Franklin Watts (1990); pg. 135, 137. "Other Left-Wing Activity. Although only fringe, fragmented organizations, several other left-wing extremist groups still exist:

...Omega 7. Omega 7 consistes of a small band of Cuban exiles in America that is committed to overthrowing President Fidel Castro of Cuba. Its leader, Eduardo Arocena, is in prison for murder, bombings, and other terrorist activities. "

Omega Institute New York 8,000 - - - 1989 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 283. "The Omega Institute in Rhinebeck, New York, attracted 8,000 people to 200 programs during its 1989 session, says an Omega spokesperson. "
Omoto Japan - - - - 1921 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 112-113. "Kyoha Shinto: 'Sect Shinto'... In 1921... the official association of Shinto sects had 13 groups... Omoto-kyo which is sometimes listed as one of the 13 came under the auspices of Fuso-kyo... "
Omoto Japan 2,000,000 - - - 1935 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 551. "Omoto (Japanese; lit. 'great source')... Now a relatively small though stable movement, Omoto had upward of two million members in the early 1930s and helped prepare leaders for other movements... "
Omoto Japan 163,760 0.14% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Shinto new religion (year of origin: 1892).
Omoto Japan - - - - 1991 *LINK* Wilson, Andrew (ed). "The World Religions and their Scriptures " in World Scripture. International Religious Foundation, 1991. (viewed 9 July 1999) Other new religions have combined Shinto with ideas from Christianity, Buddhism, and Shamanism. Omoto Kyo, The Great Foundation, was founded by Nao Deguchi in 1892. Internationalist from the beginning (i.e., advocating the use of Esperanto), and for a time suppressed by the government... "
Omoto Japan - - - - 1996 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 139. "Omoto [-kyo]: 'Great Origin'. A religious movement founded by Deguchi, Nao (1836-1918), a peasant woman who suffered many hardships before in 1892 receiving the first of a sequence of divine revalations from a previously little-known deity Ushitora no konjin... The movement was only semi-recognized as a form of kyoha shinto under the wing of Fuso-kyo and experinced many hardships with the authorities... As a result of criticisms of the government Omoto-kyo was persecuted between 1921-27 and again from 1935 when the organisation and its buildings were ruthlessly destroyed and Onisaburo imprisoned. After the war the movement re-emerged... The teachings of Omoto have strongly influenced Ananaikyo and other groups including Sekai Kyusei-kyo... and Seicho-no-ie whose respective leaders... were both originally followers of Omot. "
Omoto world 2,000,000 - - - 1935 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 11). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1496. "An immensely active man, Onisaburo sought to establish a World Federation of Religions; he dictated 81 volumes of his experience of the spirit world; and he recruited some two million followers to the faith. The government moved against Omoto again in 1935; Onisaburo was imprisoned for seven years. Only in 1945 was the sect permitted to practise again, and Onisaburo reorganized it under the name Aizen-e (Garden of Divine Love). Its following had fallen away, however, and it has remained small... An interesting teaching that is curiously parallel to the Mormon doctrine of baptism of the dead is that ancestors who died unsaved might be saved by the faith of their successors. "
Omoto world 150,000 - - - 1993 Clarke, Peter B. (editor), The Religions of the World: Understanding the Living Faiths, Marshall Editions Limited: USA (1993); pg. 208. "Despite its relatively small membership - some 150,000 adherents - Omotokyo has had a strong impact on Japanese society and has been an inspiration for other Japanese new religions... "
OMS International world 1,000,000 - 5,000
units
14
countries
1998 *LINK* web site: "The Evangelical Church of India "; web page: "The Missiological Factors Behind the ECI Church Growthgrowth " (viewed 1 March 1999) Christianity:Protestant:OMS International:
OMS now operates in more than 14 countries with about 500 overseas missionaries and 5000 national pastors, workers and evangelists. And there are about 5000 churches all over the world with about a membership of a million.
Ona Argentina - - - - 1968 Pinney, Roy. Vanishing Tribes. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1968); pg. viii. "The Yahgan, Alacaluf, and Ona of Tierra del Fuego, who endured the world's worst climate for countless generations and are known to have numbered in the thousands, have almost totally disappeared. The few individuals who can still be traced are highly acculturated; they have become almost wholly detached from their native customs and traditions. "
Ona Argentina - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "; southernmost Chile and Argentina
Ona Chile - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 702. Chapter: "South American Tribal Religions "; map: "Tribal Locations "; southernmost Chile and Argentina
Oneida Community Connecticut 45 - 1
unit
- 1981 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 63. "At one time or another, there were 7 branches, all under the leadership of John Humphrey Noyes. In addition to the main group at Oneida [Oneida Creek, NY], there were smaller branches at Willow Place, New York; Cambridge, Vermont; Newark, New Jersey; Wallingford, Connecticut; New York City; and Putney, Vermont... The branch at Wallingford, Connecticut--with about 45 members--survived until the very end [1881]. " [NOTE: These were not necessarily all open at one time.]
Oneida Community New Jersey - - 1
unit
- 1870 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 63. "At one time or another, there were 7 branches, all under the leadership of John Humphrey Noyes. In addition to the main group at Oneida [Oneida Creek, NY], there were smaller branches at Willow Place, New York; Cambridge, Vermont; Newark, New Jersey; Wallingford, Connecticut; New York City; and Putney, Vermont... " [NOTE: These were not necessarily all open at one time.]
Oneida Community New York - - - - 1850 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 502. "Perhaps the most thorough-going of all communistic religious societies was that founded by John Humphrey Noyes, which was eventually established at Oneida, in the state of New York... The Oneida Community were known as Perfectionists... "
Oneida Community New York - - 3
units
- 1870 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 63. "At one time or another, there were 7 branches, all under the leadership of John Humphrey Noyes. In addition to the main group at Oneida [Oneida Creek, NY], there were smaller branches at Willow Place, New York; Cambridge, Vermont; Newark, New Jersey; Wallingford, Connecticut; New York City; and Putney, Vermont... " [NOTE: These were not necessarily all open at one time.]
Oneida Community New York 280 - 1
unit
- 1879 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 502. "Oneida flourished, and was still flourishing, when in the 1870s the propgatation of its views led to considerable misrepresentation and brough public pressure to bear against it. Eventually, in 1879, the community was constrained to abandon its way of life in deference to public opinion, and its substantial property was converted into a joint stock company for the remaining 280 members. The industrial activities were, however, continued. "
Oneida Community New York - - 1
unit
1
country
1880 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 551. "Oneida Community (Christian). A perfectionist community founded by J. H. Noyes (1811-86) and existent in Oneida, New York from 1847 to 1880, when it became a joint stock company--Oneida Community, Ltd.--known for its silverware. "
Oneida Community New York: New York City - - 1
unit
- 1870 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 63. "At one time or another, there were 7 branches, all under the leadership of John Humphrey Noyes. In addition to the main group at Oneida [Oneida Creek, NY], there were smaller branches at Willow Place, New York; Cambridge, Vermont; Newark, New Jersey; Wallingford, Connecticut; New York City; and Putney, Vermont... " [NOTE: These were not necessarily all open at one time.]
Oneida Community USA - - - - 1870 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 63. "What was the total membership of the [Oneida] Community? It depends on what is meant by 'total.' Available records indicate that at any given time, there were around 300 members. When deaths and secessions are taken into consideration, total all-time membership was probably in the area of 500. There were roughly equal numbers of males & females... At one time or another, there were 7 branches, all under the leadership of John Humphrey Noyes... "
Oneida Community Vermont - - 1
unit
- 1846 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 502. "After a false start in 1846 at Putney, Vermont, where local hostility drove them out, the Perfectionists who had gathered around Noyes set up a community at Oneida [New York]. "
Oneida Community Vermont - - 1
unit
- 1870 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 63. "At one time or another, there were 7 branches, all under the leadership of John Humphrey Noyes. In addition to the main group at Oneida [Oneida Creek, NY], there were smaller branches at Willow Place, New York; Cambridge, Vermont; Newark, New Jersey; Wallingford, Connecticut; New York City; and Putney, Vermont... " [NOTE: These were not necessarily all open at one time.]
Oneida Community world - - - - 1848 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "ONEIDA: a religious community founded by John Noyes in 1848 on the basis of CHRISTIAN COMMUNISM and a BELIEF in human perfectibility. Believing that SIN was rooted in selfishness, they shared all things including wives. The community disbanded in 1880 when its profitable manufacturing industries became a joint stock company. "
Oneida Community world 300 - 7
units
1
country
1870 Kephart, William M. & William W. Zellner. Extraordinary Groups: An Examination of Unconventional Life-Styles (5th Ed.). New York: St. Martin's Press (1994); pg. 63. "What was the total membership of the [Oneida] Community? It depends on what is meant by 'total.' Available records indicate that at any given time, there were around 300 members. When deaths and secessions are taken into consideration, total all-time membership was probably in the area of 500. There were roughly equal numbers of males & females... At one time or another, there were 7 branches, all under the leadership of John Humphrey Noyes... "
Oneida Community world 280 - 1
unit
1
country
1879 Wilson, Bryan. "Communistic Religious Movements " in Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural, vol. 4. (Richard Cavendish, ed.) New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970).; pg. 502. "Oneida... in 1879, the community was constrained to abandon its way of life... its substantial property was converted into a joint stock company for the remaining 280 members. "
Oneida Indians North America 11,307 - - - 1991 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 252. "The total population of Iroquois today is over 60,000 (according to the US Census of 1990 and Canadian Census of 1991). " Table showing tribes of the Iroquois nation (Mohawk, Oneida, Seneca, Tuscarora, Onondaga, Cayaga), and population of the tribe. [NOTE: This is a measure of tribal affiiation. Most Iroquois today are Christian.]
Onge India: Andaman 672 - - - 1901 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "; estimate
Onge India: Andaman 672 - - - 1901 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 87. "In 1901, when the British undertook the first census in the Indian subcontinent, officials counted 624 Great Andamanese and estimated numbers for the other three tribes: 672 Onge, 468 Jarawa and 117 Sentinelese. "
Onge India: Andaman 150 - - - 1951 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "; estimate
Onge India: Andaman 150 - - - 1951 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 87. "By 1951, when independent India conducted its first census, the number of Great Andamanese had fallen to a mere 23. Estimates of the other tribes were also low--150 Onge, Jarawa and 50 Sentinelese. "
Onge India: Andaman 97 - - - 1981 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 35. "Andamanese: Alternate Names: Jarawas, Onge, Sentinelese; Location: India (Andaman Islands); Population: 269; Language: Andamanese; Religion: Animism "; "The Andamanese are the original inhabitants of the Andaman Islands... Of Negrito (Asian pgymy) stock, this population consists of hunting-and-gathering tribes... In the early years of the 20th century, 13 distinct indigenous tribes were present in the Andaman Islands. By the mid-1960s, however, only 4 groups remained [including] the Onge of Little Andaman Island... The 1981 census returned a population of 97 persons for the Onge. "
Onge India: Andaman 100 - - - 1998 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 84. Table: "Indigenous Population [of Andaman Islands] "; estimate
Onge India: Andaman 100 - - - 1998 Venkateswar, Sita. "The Andaman Islanders " in Scientific American (May 1999); pg. 87. "Only an estimated 100 Onge, 250 Jarawa and 100 Sentinelese are now alive. "
Onondaga North America 1,729 - - - 1991 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 252. "The total population of Iroquois today is over 60,000 (according to the US Census of 1990 and Canadian Census of 1991). " Table showing tribes of the Iroquois nation (Mohawk, Oneida, Seneca, Tuscarora, Onondaga, Cayaga), and population of the tribe. [NOTE: This is a measure of tribal affiiation. Most Iroquois today are Christian.]
Ontake-kyo Japan - - - - 1921 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 112-113. "Kyoha Shinto: 'Sect Shinto'... In 1921... the official association of Shinto sects had 13 groups... included... sects which had begun as shrine-supporting networks formed by shrine administrators (e.g. Shinto Taisei-kyo, Ontake-kyo, Shinto Taikyo).... "
Ontake-kyo Japan 734,390 0.64% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Shinto new religion (year of origin: 1873).
Ontake-kyo Japan - - - - 1996 Bocking, Brian. A Popular Dictionary of Shinto. Surrey, England: Curzon (1996); pg. 141. "Ontake-kyo: 'Great Mountain Sect'. Also known as Mitake-kyo. A religious movement recognised as a Shinto sect... in 1882. It was organised in the first half of the nineteenth century by Shimoyama, Osuke as a devotional association to encourage the ritual ascent of Mt. Mitake, popularly konwn as ontake-san ('Great Mountain'), in central Japan, site of a long-standing tradition of mountain worship. "
Ontake-kyo Japan - - - - 1996 Occhiogrosso, Peter. The Joy of Sects: A Spirited Guide to the World's Religious Traditions. New York: Doubleday (1996); pg. 136. "Sect Shinto consists of a wide range of sects with very different philosophies and practices. 13 are officially recognized... Some sects focus on worship of mountains... Members of Jikko Kyo and Fuso Kyo worship Mount Fuji...; Mitake Kyo [or 'Ontake-kyo'] centers around the worship of Mount Ontake... "
Open Bible Mennonite Church of Guyana Guyana 300 - 5
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Carribean, Central & South America: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " GUYANA: Open Bible Mennonite Church of Guyana; Members: 300; Congregations: 5
Open Bible Standard Churches Arizona - - 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center (Mars Hill, NC). Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. Courtesy of American Religion Data Archive. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches California - - 40
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Canada 1,000 - 4
units
- 1987 Bedell, Kenneth (ed.). Yearbook of American & Canadian Churches 1993. Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn (1993); pg. 244-247, 159. Table 1: CCS. (# of adherents is from table's "inclusive membership " column, not "full communicant " col.) Listed as "Open Bible Standard Churches of Canada, " which is Canadian branch of Des Moines,Iowa-based denomination.
Open Bible Standard Churches Canada 1,000 - - - 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: White Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 252. "Open Bible Standard Churches... In 1987 the Church reported... There were also 1,000 members in Canada... "
Open Bible Standard Churches Colorado - - 16
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Connecticut - - 1
unit
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Florida - - 29
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Georgia, USA - - 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Idaho - - 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Illinois - - 18
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Indiana - - 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Iowa - - 47
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Kansas - - 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Kentucky - - 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Maryland - - 2
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']
Open Bible Standard Churches Michigan - - 3
units
- 1990 Glenmary Research Center. Churches & Church Membership in U.S., 1990. By-county org. reports, figures from 'Churches' & inclusive 'Adherents' columns. [Listed as 'Open Bible Standard Churches, Inc..']


Open Bible Standard Churches, continued

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