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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Nottaway, North America - Southeastern Woodlands

Nottaway, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Nottaway world 1,500 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 133. Table: "Southeastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Nubians Sudan - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Nuer Africa 200,000 - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2020. "The Nuer are a Nilotic people of some 200,000 souls who live in the swampy and savannah country on both sides of the Nile, in the region where that river is fed by its two tributaries, the Sobat from the east and the Bahr al-Ghazal from the west. "
Nuer Sudan - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Nuer Sudan 500,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 341. "Nuer: Location: Southern Sudan; Population: 500,000; Religion: traditional faith (worship of Kuoth); Christianity "
Nupe Nigeria - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Nuristani Afghanistan - - - - 1989 Bratvold, Gretchen (ed). Afghanistan ...in Pictures (Visual Geography Series). Minneapolis, Minnesota: Lerner Publications Co. (1989); pg. 43. "A small number of Nuristani [an ethnic group], who are mostly farmers and herders, reside in eastern Afghanistan. The Nuristani were among the first Afghans to resist the changes instituted by the Khalq regine in the late 1970s. "
Nuxalkmc British Columbia: Nuxalk Nation 1,650 55.00% - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Nuxalk Nation " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The Nuxalk Nation territory is situated within of what is now called The Province of British Columbia. Area: 16.000 km2... The population in the Nuxalk Nation territory is about 3,000 people. 55% are Nuxalkmc. (The name Nuxalkmc means 'People of the Nuxalk Land'). They live in their territory, but many are residing in other communities. The Nation comprises of four main tribes: the Nuxaok, Kwatna, Tallio and the Kimsquit. The Chiefs from each tribe have amalgamated to form the Nuxalk Nation. Organisations: The Nuxalk People are represented in UNPO by House of Smayusta, which is the Longhouse (Government) governed by the Hereditary Chiefs and a Council of Elders. "
Nyai Zimbabwe - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Nyakyusa Tanzania - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Nyanwezi Tanzania 1,000,000 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 347, 350-351. "Nyamwezi: Location: Unyamwezi (Tanzania: Provinces of Tabora and Shinyunga); Population: 1 million; Religion: spirituality shaped by traditional beliefs; Islam; and Christianity "; Pg. 350: "Nyamwezi spirituality has been shaped by traditional beliefs, Islam an Christianity... While many rural Nyamwezi are not practicing Christians or Muslims, they do believe in one overarching god... Rather than competing with Christianity, Islam, and modern medicine, traditional Nyamwezi beliefs and diviners supplement the newer religions and practices. "
Nyaya-Vaisesika India - - - - 150 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 543. "Nyaya-Vaisesika. A Hindu philosophical system which adopts the standpoint of realism in epistemology and pluralism in metaphysics, originating in two distinct works, the Vaisesikasutras of Kanada (ca. A.D. 100?) and the Nyayasutras of Gautama (A.D. 150?). Philosophers of these separate texts realized early that their schools were complementary... Differences between the two are minimal after the seventh century, and their identity is explicityly recognized after the time of Udayana (eleventh century). The development of the system as Navya-Nyaya by Ganesa (fourteenth century) and his commentators represents... Nyaya-Vaisesika's importance should not be underestimated. Controversy between it and the rival Buddhist school of logicians headed by Dignaga and Dharmakirti dominated philosophizing in the middle of the first millennium A.D., and the influence of Navya-Nyaya one thousand years later is overshadowed only by that of the Vedanta school of Advaita. "
Nyorai-kyo Japan 34,030 0.03% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Buddhist new religion (year of origin: 1802).
Nyubi Zimbabwe - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Nzima Ghana - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Oak Cliff Bible Fellowship Church Texas: Dallas 2,600 - 1
unit
- 1992 *LINK* Thumma, Scott. web site: "Megachurches in the U.S. " (viewed Aug. 20, 1999; data collected 1992; last updated Aug. 19, 1999). Center for Social & Religious Research, Hartford Seminary. Table; "size " is avg. weekly attendance. Study finding all U.S megachurches.; Indep. cong. in Dallas, TX; pastor Anthony Evans.
Oakwind Wisconsin - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 75-76. "Oakwind, Kyril, P.O. Box 64, Mt. Horeb, WI 53507. A Pagan grove for the study, ritual and self development aimed at eventual initiation into a traditional coven; meets twice a month to study & worship together... "
Obaku Japan 120,000 - 587
units
- 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 104. "The Japanese Obaku Sect, founded by Ingen in 1654, has 587 temples and 120,000 adherents, while Soto has 14,257 and 6,848,000 and Rinzai has 5,979 and 2,530,000 respectively. "
Obaku Japan 100,000 - - - 1956 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969). [Orig. source: Morgan, Kenneth W. (ed.), The Path of the Buddha; New York: The Ronald Press Co. (1956), pg. 332-333.]; pg. 275. "Zen was imported into Japan... by Eisai... founder of Rinzai sect; in 1244 by Dogen, who founded Soto; and in 1654 by Ingen, founder of the obaku school of Zen. Today the Rinzai sect claims 2,350,000 adherents, Soto 6,750,000, and Obaku about 100,000. "
Obaku Japan - - - - 1986 Fischer-Schreiber, Ingrid, et al. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy & Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala: Boston (English: pub. 1994; orig. German: 1986); pg. 254. "Obaku school with the Rinzai and Soto schools, one of the three schools of Zen in Japan. It was originated by the Chinese master Yin-yuan Lung-ch'I, who founded the school's main monastery, Mampuku-ji, in the middle of the 17th century in Uji near Kyoto. The Obaku school is a subsidieary lineage of the Rinzai school; in present-day Japan it pssesses hardly any active monasteries and is thus the least influential of the three schools of Zen in Japan. "
Obeah Bahamas - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 71-72. "[Bahamas] On some of the islands, Christian beliefs are combined with the ancient African practice of obeah. "
Obeah Bahamas - - - - 1999 Moore, James E. Pelican Guide to the Bahamas. Gretna, Louisiana: Pelican Publishing Co. (1999); pg. 52. "On more remote islands, 'Obeah,' or voodoo, brough from Africa by slaves, is still practiced. The visitor is unlikely to see any voodoo ceremonies, for they are usually held secretly at night in rural areas. Often these early African rites have been combined with Christian ceremonials. "
Obeah Caribbean - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2039. "Obeah. General term in Jamaica and other parts of the West Indies for supernatural power; also applied to evil magic involving the use of objects as containers for occult force, especially balls of earth mixed with feathers, hair or rags, tied up with string and sometimes studded with beads or parts of bodies of human beings, cats and dogs; soil from graves, eggshells, rum, blood and broken glass are also used in spells; practised by specialist magicians called obeah-men and women. "
Obeah French Antilles - - - - 1990 Gravette, A. Gerald. The French Antilles. New York: Hippocrene Books (1990); pg. 31. "'Obeh,' the universal magic of the islands, still retains its dark secrets and ancient medicianl cures--dispensed by the local quimboiseurs--a word derived from the old tradition of curing known as 'Tien Bois.' "
Obeah Jamaica - - - - 1998 Davis, Rod. American Voudou: Journey Into A Hidden World. Denton, Texas: University of North Texas Press (1998); pg. 9. "In different areas, voudou has different rituals and doctrines, running a sectarian range roughly comparable to that from Judaism through Protestantism to Catholicism. In Haiti, the religion metamorphosed into vodun or vaudoux; in Cuba, santeria, in Brazil, candomble; in Trinidad, Shango Baptist; in Mexico, curanderismo; in Jamaica, obeah. In the American South, it became voodoo and, in the most extreme caricature, hoodoo... "
Obeah Louisiana - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 106. "Elements of Obeah worship can be found in various forms in Louisiana and South Carolina. "
Obeah South Carolina - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 106. "Elements of Obeah worship can be found in various forms in Louisiana and South Carolina. "
Obeah Suriname - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 411. "The cult of Obeah exists not only in Suriname, but also in neighboring Guyana... and in several Caribbean islands such as Jamaica. "
Obeah world - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 411. "The main religion in Suriname is Christianity, followed by Hinduism and Islam. Some Christian groups also pratice traditional African beliefs such as Obeah and Winti, which translated literally means 'wind.' This is a traditionally polyththeistic and largely secret religion of West African origin. It recognizes that there are a multitude of gods and ghosts each having their own myths, rites, offerings, taboos, and magical forces. The phenomenon of Obeah is that it is a healer god, who can also be invoked to bring illness and other calamities to one's own enemy. The cult of Obeah exists not only in Suriname, but also in neighboring Guyana... and in several Caribbean islands such as Jamaica. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of Argentina - - 1
unit
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Internationally, the Western Orthodox Church had 60 parishes, most in France, but including two each in Switzerland and Spain and one each in Germany, Belgium, and Argentina. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of Belgium - - 1
unit
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Internationally, the Western Orthodox Church had 60 parishes, most in France, but including two each in Switzerland and Spain and one each in Germany, Belgium, and Argentina. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of California - - 1
unit
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Membership: In 1984 the Association had 5 parishes (New York City; Brooklyn, NY; Chicago; Dorchester, MA; and Fullerton, CA) and a monastery in Jacksonville, Florida. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of Florida - - 1
unit
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Membership: In 1984 the Association had 5 parishes (New York City; Brooklyn, NY; Chicago; Dorchester, MA; and Fullerton, CA) and a monastery in Jacksonville, Florida. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of France - - 48
units
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Association of Occidental Orthodox Parishes... New York, NY [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1984 the Association had 5 parishes... and a monastery... Internationally, the Western Orthodox Church had 60 parishes, most in France, but including two each in Switzerland and Spain and one each in Germany, Belgium, and Argentina. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of Germany - - 1
unit
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Internationally, the Western Orthodox Church had 60 parishes, most in France, but including two each in Switzerland and Spain and one each in Germany, Belgium, and Argentina. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of Illinois - - 1
unit
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Membership: In 1984 the Association had 5 parishes (New York City; Brooklyn, NY; Chicago; Dorchester, MA; and Fullerton, CA) and a monastery in Jacksonville, Florida. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of Massachusetts - - 1
unit
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Membership: In 1984 the Association had 5 parishes (New York City; Brooklyn, NY; Chicago; Dorchester, MA; and Fullerton, CA) and a monastery in Jacksonville, Florida. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of New York - - 2
units
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Membership: In 1984 the Association had 5 parishes (New York City; Brooklyn, NY; Chicago; Dorchester, MA; and Fullerton, CA) and a monastery in Jacksonville, Florida. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of New York: Brooklyn - - 1
unit
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Membership: In 1984 the Association had 5 parishes (New York City; Brooklyn, NY; Chicago; Dorchester, MA; and Fullerton, CA) and a monastery in Jacksonville, Florida. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of New York: New York City - - 1
unit
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Membership: In 1984 the Association had 5 parishes (New York City; Brooklyn, NY; Chicago; Dorchester, MA; and Fullerton, CA) and a monastery in Jacksonville, Florida. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of Spain - - 2
units
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Internationally, the Western Orthodox Church had 60 parishes, most in France, but including two each in Switzerland and Spain and one each in Germany, Belgium, and Argentina. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of Switzerland - - 2
units
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Internationally, the Western Orthodox Church had 60 parishes, most in France, but including two each in Switzerland and Spain and one each in Germany, Belgium, and Argentina. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of USA - - 6
units
- 1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Membership: In 1984 the Association had 5 parishes (New York City; Brooklyn, NY; Chicago; Dorchester, MA; and Fullerton, CA) and a monastery in Jacksonville, Florida. "
Occidental Orthodox Parishes, Association of world - - 60
units
7
countries
1984 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 116. "Association of Occidental Orthodox Parishes... New York, NY [H.Q.]... Membership: In 1984 the Association had 5 parishes... and a monastery... Internationally, the Western Orthodox Church had 60 parishes, most in France, but including two each in Switzerland and Spain and one each in Germany, Belgium, and Argentina. "
Oceanic tribal religions Oceania - - - - 1600 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 545. "Oceanic tribal religions... Today almost all Polynesians, most Melanesians and Micronesians... are baptized Christians. Still, despite linguistic diversity and the many local variations of the past, it is possible to speak of traditional Australian, Melanesian, and Polynesian types of religion. Micronesian religions, though barely explored, included elements of the Melanesian and Polynesian type. Throughout the whole area communities worked in and with stone, shell, bone, obsidian, wood, and vegetable fibers; carved and painted incidents and figures taken from myths which, telling of creation and the local human condition, roughly corresponded with the sacred scriptures of literate societies, and paid their respects in their various ways to guardian and tutelary divinities or powers (gods, ghosts, spirits, ancestors, etc.)... "
Of a Like Mind world - - - - 1991 Jade. To Know: A Guide to Women's Magic and Spirituality. Oak Park, IL: Delphi Press (1991); pg. 76. "Of a Like Mind, P.O. Box 6021, Madison, WI 53716... An international organization of spiritual [women] following positive paths to spiritual growth; providing services specially designed to network and aid communication among like-minded [women]; publishes Of a Like Mind newspaper quarterly; womyn only. "
Oglalla Sioux world 20,000 - - - 1973 Deloria Jr., Vine. God Is Red; New York: Grosset & Dunlap (1973); pg. 256. "Today the Oglalla Sioux number at least fifteen thousand people, perhaps twenty thousand. A substantial number live off the reservation and participate only sporadically in community life. " [Tribal # is not necessarily equal to rel. affiliation]
Ogoni Nigeria 500,000 - - - 1997 *LINK* Gamming, Jenny. They have a flag-but no country " in Swedish Expressen, 17 Aug. 1997. (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site. Translated by SSF/Goran Hansson. "The Ogoni People consists of 500,000 people in the southeastern Nigeria. The struggle against the oil company Shell's exploiting of their land has received considerable international attention and increasingly so after the execution, by the military dictatorship in Nigeria in November 1995, of the human rights and environment activist Ken Saro-Wiva. The Ogoni People has suffered very much by oil spills and oil pollution, which has destroyed their environment. "
Ogoni Nigeria 500,000 - - - 1999 *LINK* Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organisation web site; web page: "Ogoni " (Viewed 16 Aug. 1999). "The Ogoni live in an area of about 100,000 km2 east of Port Harcourt in Rivers State, Nigeria... The Ogoni are a distinct ethnic group with a population more than 500,000. They are an agricultural and fishing people living in several communities spread through six kingdoms where four languages with linguistic similarities are spoken. Archaeological and oral historical evidence suggests that the Ogoni have lived in the Niger Delta for about 500 years. Organisations: The Ogoni are represented in UNPO by the Movement for the Survival of Ogoni People (MOSOP). "
Ohio Yearly Meeting of the Society of Friends USA 692 - 10
units
1
country
1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: European Free-Church Family; section: Quakers (Friends); pg. 322-323. "Ohio Yearly Meeting of the Society of Friends... Barnesville, OH [H.Q.]... Membership: IN 1987 the meeting reported 692 members in 10 monthly meetings. "
Okande Gabon - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Okinawa Baptist Convention Japan 3,375 - 37
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Old Believers Alaska - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 385. "A very small group of Russian Americans belong to the Old Believers sect of the Russian Orthodox Church, following the teachings of the Church prior to changed that were made in 1654. These Old Believers live in intentionally isolated communities in Alaska and Oregon, speak only Russian, wear 17th century clothing and keep themselves separte from the rest of society. "
Old Believers Belarus - - 26
units
- 1993 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 63. "In 1993, there were about 1,500 religious congregations in Belarus, including 787 Orthodox, 305 Roman Catholic, 170 Pentecostal, 141 Baptist, 26 Old Believer (a breakaway Orthodox sect dating back to the 17th century)... "
Old Believers Estonia: Lake Peipsi - 16.00% - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "lake-peipus.net "; web page: "Religion and Culture " (viewed 9 Jan. 1999); "References: Tatiana Maximova, Eiki Berg " "While along the Russian border of Lake Peipsi most people are Russian Orthodox & the culture is fairly homogeneous, the Estonian borderlands [are very diverse in] culture & religion... On the Estonian side of Lake Peipsi: [Ethnicity:] 56% are Estonians; 34% Russians; [Religion:] 26% Lutheran; 22% Russian Orthodox; 16% Old Believers; 33% Non-religious "
Old Believers Latvia - 5.50% - - 1935 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 225. "In 1935, 55.1% of Latvians were Lutheran, 24.4% were Roman Catholic, 8.9 were Orthodox, 5.5% were Old Believers, 4.8% were Jewish, and the rest belonged to other religions. "
Old Believers Latvia - - 56
units
- 1993 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 225. "In 1993, the number of parishes in Latvia was as follows: Lutheran, 290; Roman Catholic, 191; Russian Orthodox, 100; Baptist, 69; Old Believers, 56; Pentecostal, 44; Adventist, 33; Jewish, 5; and others, 23. "
Old Believers Lithuania - - - - 1675 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 233. "In the late 17th century, many Old Believers came from russia to escape persecution. "
Old Believers Lithuania - - 51
units
- 1997 Kagda, Sakina. Lithuania (series: Cultures of the World). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1997); pg. 71. "There are 51 religious congregations headed by the Supreme Pomorski Old Ritualists' Council in Vilnius. The Old Believers are a group that formed as the result of a schism in the Russian Orthodox Church in the 17th century. Many emigrated to the Baltic states, where there was more religious freedom. "
Old Believers Lithuania - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 231, 234. "Presently, about 80% of Lithuanians who profess a religious belief are Roman Catholic, and most of the rest are Old Believers, Russian Orthodox adherents, Lutherans, and Jews. "
Old Believers Moldova - - 15
units
- 1992 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 253. "As of the early 1990s, Moldova had 853 Orthodox churches and 11 Orthodox monasteries. There were also 14 Old Believers churches... and a monastery. "
Old Believers North America - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 385. "A very small group of Russian Americans belong to the Old Believers sect of the Russian Orthodox Church, following the teachings of the Church prior to changed that were made in 1654. These Old Believers live in intentionally isolated communities in Alaska and Oregon, speak only Russian, wear 17th century clothing and keep themselves separte from the rest of society. "
Old Believers Oregon - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 385. "A very small group of Russian Americans belong to the Old Believers sect of the Russian Orthodox Church, following the teachings of the Church prior to changed that were made in 1654. These Old Believers live in intentionally isolated communities in Alaska and Oregon, speak only Russian, wear 17th century clothing and keep themselves separte from the rest of society. "
Old Believers Pennsylvania - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2058. "Anyone lucky enough to locate the Old Believer community at Erie, Pennsylvania, and to attend their church near the lake front very early on a Sunday morning will find young, middle-aged, and old people, all in peasant costume, immersing themselves in the atmosphere of traditional Russia. "
Old Believers Russia - - - - 1850 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 550. "Old Believers. Schismatic members of the Russian Orthodox Church. They rejected the liturgical reforms of Patriarch Nikon (seventeenth century), who imposed practices conforming to Greek usage. Old Believers insisted on retaining such older practices as making the sign of the cross with two fingers instead of three. In the course of time they split into two groups: priestly (popovtsy) and priestless (bespopovtsy). The latter group produced many smaller groups or sects... "


Old Believers, continued

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