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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

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back to Nichiren Buddhism, world

Nichiren Buddhism, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Nichiren Buddhism world 2,000,000 - - - 1983 Hopfe, Lews M. Religions of the World, Macmillan Publishing Co.: New York (1983) [3rd edition]; pg. 186. "Although Nichiren itself has only slightly over two million followers today, it has been the source of another Buddhist sect, Soka Gakkai, which is much larger. "
Nichiren Buddhism - traditional sects Japan 2,225,000 - - - 1969 Hutchinson, John A. Paths of Faith; New York: McGraw-Hill (1969); pg. 277. "In recent and contemporary times it has generated several significantly nationalistic sects. Among the older and more traditional forms of Nichiren Buddhism, there are today some 2 1/4 million adherents in Japan. "
Nichiren Daishonin Barbados - - 1
unit
- 1998 *LINK* tourism page: "Fun Barbados " Barbados Religion page: church listing. "Currently there are around 60 Anglican churches that can be found on the island and over the years many other denominations have joined and can be found list below. "
Nichiren Shoshu Japan - - - - 1290 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 538. "Nichiren-shu and Nichiren Sho-shu. From among eighteen disciples Nichiren chose six to carry on the work he had begun and enjoined them to perform the prescribed duties at his grave. Nichiren sho-shu possesses two documents, the Minobu sojo and the Ikegami sojo, which it contends prove conclusively that Nichiren selected Nikko (1246-1333) alone to succeed him. In 1288, Nikko left Mt. Minobu and in 1290 he established Taisekiji [the head Nishiren Sho-shu temple]... The branch which Nikko established is known as Nichiren Sho-shu, which means 'The Orthodox Faith of Nichiren.' "
Nichiren Shoshu Japan - - 724
units
- 1998 *LINK* web site: "Introduction to Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism "; web page: "Nichiren Shoshu Temples " (viewed 1 March 1999) "At this time, including the Head Temple Taisekiji, Nichiren Shoshu has 724 temples throughout Japan. "
Nichiren Shoshu USA 200,000 - - - 1970 Neusner, Jacob (ed). World Religions in America: An Introduction; Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox Press (1994); pg. 236. "Soka Gakkai also brought Nichiren to America... It quickly became Nichiren Shoshu of America (NSA), later Nichiren Shoshu Academy... NSA claimed some 200,000 American followers by 1970, predominantly non-Asian Americans. "
Nichiren Shoshu USA - - - - 1982 Long, Robert Emmet (ed.). Religious Cults in America (The Reference Shelf: Volume 66 Number 4), New York: The H. W. Wilson Co. (1994). [Orig. source: Article by J. Gordon Melton. From appendix A of The Cult Experience, Cleveland, OH: The Pilgrim Press (1982)]; pg. 92. "After coming to America in the early 1960s, the Nichiren Shoshu experienced a rapid growth among non-Orientals in the late sixties and spread into a national movement in the early seventies. George N. Williams, a Caucasian, became its General Director and led its development so that now units can be found in most major U.S. cities. "
Nichiren Shoshu USA 330,000 - - - 1983 Long, Robert Emmet (ed.). Religious Cults in America (The Reference Shelf: Volume 66 Number 4), New York: The H. W. Wilson Co. (1994); pg. 119. "Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism in America... a remarkable growth rate (claiming about 330,000 in 1983), it has been able to exist and prosper in a state of continuous high accomodation. "
Nichiren Shoshu world - - - - 1913 Barrett, D. Sects, 'Cults', and Alternative Religions. London, UK: Blandford (1997); pg. 156. "Over the years, Nichiren's version of Buddhism split into many directions: by this century there were around 40 different Nichiren sects. One of these was founded by Nikko Shonin, who had left Nichiren's temple at Minobu after falling out with other disciples and had built a temple at Kitayama. Eventually, in 1913, Nikko's version of Nichiren's version of Buddhism, which was battling against not only the rest of Buddhism but also the other Nichiren sects, set itself up firmly as the Orthodox Nichiren Sect, or Nichiren Shoshu. "
Nichiren Shoshu world - except Japan 600,000 - 732
units
40
countries
1998 *LINK* web site: "Introduction to Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism "; web page: "Nichiren Shoshu Temples " (viewed 1 March 1999) Buddhism:Mahayana:Nichiren:Nichiren Shoshu:
The number of overseas lay believers at present totals 600,000 in 40 different countries. Nichiren Shoshu has 724 temples throughout Japan. Additionally, overseas, there are a total of eight temples in the following countries
Nichiren Shu Japan - - - - 1290 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 538. "Nichiren-shu and Nichiren Sho-shu... The branch which Nikko established is known as Nichiren Sho-shu, which means 'The Orthodox Faith of Nichiren.' The doctrinal differences between Nichiren-shu and Nichiren Sho-shu may be summarized as follows: In Nichiren-shu, the Buddha is Sakyamuni, the dharma is Namu myo-ho-renge-kyo, which stands for the literal meaning of the Lotus Sutra, and the priest is Nichiren. In Nichiren Sho-shu, the Buddha is Nichiren himself..., the dharma is the Namu myo-ho-renge-kyo of the Three Great Hidden Laws, and the priest is Nikko. "
Nietzsche world - - - - 1970 Naisbitt, John & Patricia Aburdene. Megatrends 2000: Ten New Directions for the 1990's. New York: William Morrow and Co. (1990); pg. 272. "The objective of both religion and science is to find 'truth'.' Since the 18th century Enlightenment, though, Westerners have worshiped science almost as a religion. Bolstered by the thinking of the 19th-century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, this trend culminated in the secular 'God is dead' philosophy articulated by radical theologian Thomas J. J. Altizer in the 1960's and 1970's. But today, with the millennium in sight, the powerful countertrend of the religious revival is repudiating blind faith in science and technology. "
Nigerian Baptist Convention Nigeria 1,026,000 - 5,200
units
- 1998 *LINK* Baptist World Alliance web site; page: "BWA Statistics " (viewed 31 March 1999). "Figures are for BWA affiliated conventions/unions only (no independents included). "; Table with 3 columns: Country, "Churches ", & "Members "; "1997/1998 Totals "
Nihon Kirisuto Keiteidan Japan 140 - 6
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Asia/Pacific: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " JAPAN: Nihon Kirisuto Keiteidan... Members: 140; Congregations: 6
Nihon Menonaito Kirisuto Kyokai Kaigi Japan 813 - 18
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Asia/Pacific: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " JAPAN... Nihon Menonaito Kirisuto Kyokai Kaigi... Members: 813; Congregations: 18
Nihon Menonaito Kyokai Kyogikai Japan 466 - 21
units
- 1998 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Asia/Pacific: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " JAPAN... Nihon Menonaito Kyokai Kyogikai... Members: 466; Congregations: 21
Nihonzan Myohoji Japan 1,120 0.00% - - 1978 Reid, D. "Japanese Religions " in Hinnells, John R. (ed). A Handbook of Living Religions, Penguin Books: New York (1991 reprint; 1st pub. 1984). [Orig. src: Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook), Ministry of Education & Bureau of Statistics.]; pg. 373. "Table: Some surviving new religious orgs. in Japan "; "Membership figures, voluntarily reported..., as found in the 1979 ed. of the Shukyo Nenkan (Religions Yearbook). " Classified as Buddhist new religion (year of origin: 1917).
Nilotes Africa - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2000. "The Nilotes or Nilotic peoples of Africa consist of several culturally related tribes and nations. They live south of the Sahara, stretching from the Nile valley of the southern Sudan and Ethiopia, down to Uganda, where some extend west into the Congo, and eastwards into Kenya. The best known are the Nuer, Dinka, Shilluk, and the Anuak of the Sudan, most of whom, however, are in Ethiopia; the Acholi and Lango of Uganda, the Alur of Uganda and the Congo, and the Luo of Kenya. They speak closely related languages and name similar religious and magial conceptions by variants of conspicuously similar words. "
Nimatullahi world - - - - 1999 *LINK* web site: "Naqshbandi.net "; web page: "A 30-Second Guide to Sufi Orders Found in North America " (viewed 10 Feb. 1999). [Orig. source: GNOSIS Magazine #30 (Winter 1994)] "Nimatullahi (founder: Shah Wali Nimatullah [1330-1431]). The Nimatullahis are the most widespread Shi'ite Sufi order and are most concentrated in Iran. Their leader Dr. Javad Nurbakhsh now lives in London and they are found throughout the U.S. "
Nipmuc North America - Eastern Woodlands 500 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Nipmuc world 500 - - - 1600 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 200. Table: "Eastern Woodlands: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber)
Nippon Menonaito Burezaren Kyodan Japan 1,951 - 25
units
- 1994 *LINK* Mennonite World Conference web site. Directory 1998. Web page: "Asia/Pacific: Mennonite & Brethren in Christ Churches " JAPAN... Nippon Menonaito Burezaren Kyodan... Members (1994): 1,951; Congregations: 25
Nirankari world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 692. "Sikh sects and orders.... There are several religious orders of Sikhs... Udasi... Nirmala... Nihangi... Namdhari... Besides the above orders, there are sects who believe in the succession of gurus continuing after Guru Gobind Singh and pay homage to a living guru. The most important of these are the Nirankari, who include persons of all religions without requiring conversion to Sikhism. "
Nisqually North America - Pacific Coast 3,600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Muckleshoot, Puyallup
Nisqually world 3,600 - - - 1780 Terrell, John Upton. American Indian Almanac. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (1974); pg. 430-431. Table: "The Pacific Coast: Earliest Population Estimates " (mainly relying on James Mooney, John R. Swanson, & A. L. Kroeber); Includes figures for Muckleshoot, Puyallup
Nivkhs Russia 4,631 - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 278-280. [Article: Nivkhs] "Nivkhs: Location: Russia (extreme southeastern Siberia); Population: 4,631; Religion: Traditional form of shamanism "; "The traditional Nivkh religion is a form of shamanism... Many Nivkh shamans were imprisoned and executed during Stalins anti-religious campaigns; as a result, shamanism was driven underground. The Nivkhs have practiced their religion more openly since Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev ended the Soviet government's persecution of religion during the 1980s. "
Nizari Ismailis India - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 406. "Khojas. An Indian Muslim caste, converted from Hinduism in the fourteenth century by a Persian missionary of Isma'iliyya... there are at present three varieites of Khojas: 1) the majority, who are Nizari Ismailis and follow the Agha Khan; 2) Sunni Khojas; and 3) Imamite Khojas. Most Khojas are found in western India and east Africa. "
Nizari Ismailis Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 215. "'Assassins': An Ismaili movement spread in the 11th century in the mountains of northern Iran around the fortress of Alamut by Husan-I Sabbah. He intimidated his enemies with political assassinations, often carried out by his followers... Disputed successions in the 12th century meant that the Assassins largely disappeared, but today there are still supporters of rival claimants: the Nizaris who support the claims of Nizar; and the Tayyibis who support Tayyib. "
Nizari Ismailis Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 221. "Nizari Ismailis: Following the destruction of the Assassin fortress at Alamut in 1256 by Mongols it is claimed that the last Imam of Alamut sent his son for safety in Azerbaijan. In 1840 the Imam, Hasan Ali Shah, who had taken the title Aga Khan went to India, where there were a number of his followers called Khojas. Today Khojas live mainly in Gujarat, Bombay and East Africa. Nizari Ismailis who also acknowledge the Aga Khan live in Salamiyya in Syria. "
Nizari Ismailis world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 366. "The Nizaris are widely dispersed in Syria, Iran, India, and east Africa, and have developed varying understandings of their Alamut heritage. "
Nizari Ismailis world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 636. "However, the early beliefs of the Sab'iyya were essentially transformed, and its revolutionary aims gradually gave way to the esoteric and hence quietistic posture of the present day Nizari and of the Must'ali Ismailis. "
Nizari Ismailis world - - - - 1993 Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck & Jane Idleman Smith. Mission to America: Five Islamic Sectarian Communities in North America; Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida (1993); pg. 4-5. "At present there are 2 Isma'ili [Seveners] groups. The Nizari Isma'ilis recognize the legitimacy of Nizar, whose line of Imams has continued from 1095 to today... Nizaris live mainly in Pakistan, India, West Africa, Syria, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan... "
Nogai Russia: Dagestan 75,000 - - - 1989 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 294-295. Table with 2 columns: "Ethnic Group " [not religious groups] & "Population "; Pg. 295: "Aside from the Mountain Jews and the Christian Cossacks, the peoples of Dagestan are almost exclusively Muslim. "
Nohwe Zimbabwe - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Nok Nigeria - - - - 200 C.E. Haskins, Jim & Joann Biondi. From Afar to Zulu: A Dictionary of African Cultures. New York: Walker Publishing Co. (1995); pg. 186. "Africa's Lost Cultures... Nok: The oldest culture of West Africa, the Nok peoples date back over 2,000 years. The Nok lived in the central regions of present-day Nigeria... Historians estimate that the Nok lived in Nigeria between 500 B.C. and A.D. 200... Around 100 B.C., hunting and herding societies began to take control of most of the Nok region. These new societies established their own agricultural communities, and many of the Nok slowly merged with them. By about A.D. 200, the Nok became assimilated into these other societies, and their own culture and economic unity dwindled. Eventually the Nok culture withered away. "
Nomiya Luo Church Kenya - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 1 - Africa. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 246. "The first independent church in Kenya, and currently one of Kenya's largest, was called the Nomiya Luo Church. Its founder, Johana Owalo, was one of the early converts to Christianity around the year 1900. In 1906, he was baptized a Roman Catholic. In 1907, he had a vision and was taken to Heaven by the Angel Gabriel... After this and other instructional visions, he left Catholicism for Anglicanism. Subsequent to this, he learned to speak Arabic and converted to the Islamic faith. In time, he began to teach that mission churches were contrary to African traditions and began to attract many followers... "
non-Christian Africa 379,897,984 52.18% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
non-Christian Africa 387,256,000 51.76% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
non-Christian Angola - 32.00% - - 1998 *LINK* official country web site Religions: Roman Catholic (51%), Protestant (17%), non-Christian (32%)
non-Christian Asia 3,151,194,880 91.13% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
non-Christian Asia 3,210,091,008 91.37% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
non-Christian Australia - 2.60% - - 1991 *LINK* Anglican Communion News Service (ACNS). "Australia: Statistics Show Australians Religious Affiliation " in ACNS #1315, 3 Sept. 1997 [97.8.5.2] (viewed online 24 June 1999). "According to figures recently released by the Australian government's Bureau of Statistics... of Australia's nearly 18 million people... statistics... from the nation's latest census in 1996 [which] includes the question: 'What is your religion?'... Groups other than Christian have increased, since 1991, from 2.6% to 3.45%... " [This does not include 16.5% with 'no religion']
non-Christian Australia - 2.60% - - 1991 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 44. "1991 census... Only 2.6% of the population belonged to 'non-Christian' religions--e.g., Muslims, Buddhists, and Jews. "
non-Christian Australia 621,000 3.45% - - 1996 *LINK* Anglican Communion News Service (ACNS). "Australia: Statistics Show Australians Religious Affiliation " in ACNS #1315, 3 Sept. 1997 [97.8.5.2] (viewed online 24 June 1999). "According to figures recently released by the Australian government's Bureau of Statistics... of Australia's nearly 18 million people... statistics... from the nation's latest census in 1996 [which] includes the question: 'What is your religion?'... Groups other than Christian have increased, since 1991, from 2.6% to 3.45%... " [This does not include 16.5% with 'no religion']
non-Christian Europe 175,107,008 24.09% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
non-Christian Europe 172,678,000 23.73% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
non-Christian Latin America 33,999,000 7.36% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
non-Christian Latin America 34,625,000 7.06% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
non-Christian North America 43,564,000 14.88% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
non-Christian North America 40,135,000 13.57% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
non-Christian Oceania 4,709,000 16.49% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
non-Christian Oceania 4,720,000 16.29% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
non-Christian Papua New Guinea 10,000 0.30% - - 1990 *LINK* Web site: Datec's "The Papua New Guinea Web Site " "The 1990 census recorded just over ninety thousand people (2.6%) who claimed they followed no religion and a mere ten thousand people (0.3%) who declared themselves to be non-Christian. The other 97% are, at least nominally, followers of the Christian faith. "
non-Christian Philippines: Iligan City - 6.39% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: "Iligan City, Philippines: General Information " (1998) "Religion : Christian 93.61%; Others 6.39% "
non-Christian United Kingdom - 10.00% - - 1998 Christian Century (Apr. 22-29, 1998); pg. 428. "Other faiths comprise less than 10 percent of the population, so 90 percent still are rooted in a Christian position [in United Kingdom]. "
non-Christian USA 2,724,800 3.60% - - 1900 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States
non-Christian USA 18,928,000 9.20% - - 1970 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States
non-Christian USA 34,942,000 14.00% - - 1990 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States
non-Christian USA 38,791,000 14.70% - - 1995 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States
non-Christian USA - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 28. "...Asian American Buddhists and Hindus constructed temples and ashrams. Eventually enough Arabs immigrated to the US to establish Muslim mosques... Clearly, the U.S. is no longer a Protestant nation. Christianity is still the majority religion, but other religions are well represented. Mainstream Americans have recently shown an increasing interest in Asian philosophy and religion, such as Buddhism, Zen, yoga, and the martial arts. "
non-Christian USA 41,644,000 15.10% - - 2000 1996 Britannica Book of the Year Table: Non-Christian Religious Adherents in the United States. Year 2000 projection done in 1995.
non-Christian world 3,788,472,064 66.27% - - 1995 The World Almanac and Book of Facts 1997 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1996 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 646. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1995 "
non-Christian world 3,848,890,880 66.31% - - 1996 The World Almanac & Book of Facts 1998 (K-111 Reference Corp.: Mahwah, NJ), [Source: 1997 Encyc. Britannica Book of the Year]; pg. 654. Table: "Adherents of All Religions by Six Continental Areas, Mid-1996 "
Non-Subscribing Presbyterian Church of Ireland world 4,500 - - - 1998 Chryssides, George D. The Elements of Unitarianism. Shaftesbury, Dorset, United Kingdom: Element Books Limited (1998); pg. 107. "The Non-Subscribing Presbyterian Church of Ireland (NSPCI) has approx. 3,700 members and 800 children, many of whom regard themselves as Unitarians. "
Nonconference Conservative Mennonites USA - - - - 1956 Hostetler, John A. Amish Society (3rd ed.; 1st ed. pub. 1963). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (1980); pg. 277. "A movement describing itself as 'Nonconference Conservative Mennonites' began to appear about the year 1956. Its members consist of former Beachy Amish persons and some who withdrew from Mennonite congregations to find a more conservative climate. They have occasionally published a periodical, and presently issue The Harvest Call. Representatives of this group meet at unspecified times to survey the 'drift toward worldliness' and to support one another against more organized forms of Mennonitism. "


Nonconference Conservative Mennonites, continued

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